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Dermal atrophy

MedGen UID:
101793
Concept ID:
C0151514
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: Skin atrophy
SNOMED CT: Atrophic condition of skin (400190005); Atrophy of skin (400190005); Skin atrophy (400190005); Atrophic skin (400190005); Atrophoderma (400190005)
 
HPO: HP:0004334
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0006610

Definition

Partial or complete wasting (atrophy) of the skin. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Focal dermal hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
42055
Concept ID:
C0016395
Disease or Syndrome
Focal dermal hypoplasia is a multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. Skin manifestations present at birth include atrophic and hypoplastic areas of skin; cutis aplasia; fat nodules in the dermis manifesting as soft, yellow-pink cutaneous nodules; and pigmentary changes. Verrucoid papillomas of the skin and mucous membranes may appear later. The nails can be ridged, dysplastic, or hypoplastic; hair can be sparse or absent. Limb malformations include oligo-/syndactyly and split hand/foot. Developmental abnormalities of the eye can include anophthalmia/microphthalmia, iris and chorioretinal coloboma, and lacrimal duct abnormalities. Craniofacial findings can include facial asymmetry, notched alae nasi, cleft lip and palate, and pointed chin. Occasional findings include dental anomalies, abdominal wall defects, diaphragmatic hernia, and renal anomalies. Psychomotor development is usually normal; some individuals have cognitive impairment.
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Disease or Syndrome
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
DE SANCTIS-CACCHIONE SYNDROME
MedGen UID:
75550
Concept ID:
C0265201
Disease or Syndrome
A rare autosomal recessive inherited syndrome. It is characterized by xeroderma pigmentosum, mental retardation, dwarfism, hypogonadism, and neurologic abnormalities.
Baller-Gerold syndrome
MedGen UID:
120532
Concept ID:
C0265308
Disease or Syndrome
Baller-Gerold syndrome (BGS) can be suspected at birth in an infant with craniosynostosis and upper limb abnormality. The coronal suture is most commonly affected; the metopic, lambdoid, and sagittal sutures may also be involved alone or in combination. Upper limb abnormality can include a combination of thumb hypo- or aplasia and radial hypo- or aplasia and may be asymmetric. Malformation or absence of carpal or metacarpal bones has also been described. Skin lesions may appear anytime within the first few years after birth, typically beginning with erythema of the face and extremities and evolving into poikiloderma. Slow growth is apparent in infancy with eventual height and length typically at 4 SD below the mean.
Xeroderma pigmentosum group A
MedGen UID:
82775
Concept ID:
C0268135
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Xeroderma pigmentosum group B
MedGen UID:
78643
Concept ID:
C0268136
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Xeroderma pigmentosum, group D
MedGen UID:
75656
Concept ID:
C0268138
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Flynn-Aird syndrome
MedGen UID:
91009
Concept ID:
C0343108
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disease characterized by childhood onset of bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss, ocular anomalies (myopia, cataract, retinitis pigmentosa), central and peripheral nervous system features (dementia, epilepsy, ataxia, peripheral neuropathy), ectodermal features (skin atrophy, alopecia, dental caries), and skeletal anomalies (bone cysts, joint stiffness, scoliosis, kyphosis). Laboratory examination may reveal elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein.
Branchiooculofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
91261
Concept ID:
C0376524
Disease or Syndrome
The branchiooculofacial syndrome (BOFS) is characterized by: branchial (cervical or infra- or supra-auricular) skin defects that range from barely perceptible thin skin or hair patch to erythematous "hemangiomatous" lesions to large weeping erosions; ocular anomalies that can include microphthalmia, anophthalmia, coloboma, and nasolacrimal duct stenosis/atresia; and facial anomalies that can include ocular hypertelorism or telecanthus, broad nasal tip, upslanted palpebral fissures, cleft lip or prominent philtral pillars that give the appearance of a repaired cleft lip (formerly called "pseudocleft lip") with or without cleft palate, upper lip pits, and lower facial weakness (asymmetric crying face or partial 7th cranial nerve weakness). Malformed and prominent pinnae and hearing loss from inner ear and/or petrous bone anomalies are common. Intellect is usually normal.
Kindler syndrome
MedGen UID:
96060
Concept ID:
C0406557
Disease or Syndrome
Kindler syndrome (KS), a rare subtype of inherited epidermolysis bullosa, is characterized by skin fragility and acral blister formation beginning at birth, diffuse cutaneous atrophy, photosensitivity (most prominent during childhood and usually decreasing after adolescence), poikiloderma, diffuse palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, and pseudosyndactyly. Mucosal manifestations are also common and include hemorrhagic mucositis and gingivitis, periodontal disease, premature loss of teeth, and labial leukokeratosis. Other mucosal findings can include ectropion, urethral stenosis, and severe phimosis. Severe long-term complications of KS include periodontitis, mucosal strictures, and aggressive squamous cell carcinomas. Manifestations can range from mild to severe.
Dysosteosclerosis
MedGen UID:
98150
Concept ID:
C0432262
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic primary bone dysplasia disease characterized by progressive osteosclerosis and platyspondyly.
Cockayne syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
155487
Concept ID:
C0751038
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a continuous phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or "moderate" form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal (COFS) syndrome; CS type III, a milder and later-onset form; COFS syndrome, a fetal form of CS. CS type I is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age five years. CS type III is a phenotype in which major clinical features associated with CS only become apparent after age two years; growth and/or cognition exceeds the expectations for CS type I. COFS syndrome is characterized by very severe prenatal developmental anomalies (arthrogryposis and microphthalmia).
Dyskeratosis congenita, X-linked
MedGen UID:
216941
Concept ID:
C1148551
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Barber-Say syndrome
MedGen UID:
230818
Concept ID:
C1319466
Disease or Syndrome
Barber-Say syndrome (BBRSAY) is a rare congenital condition characterized by severe hypertrichosis, especially of the back, skin abnormalities such as hyperlaxity and redundancy, and facial dysmorphism, including macrostomia, eyelid deformities, ocular telecanthus, abnormal and low-set ears, bulbous nasal tip with hypoplastic alae nasi, and low frontal hairline (summary by Roche et al., 2010).
Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type B lipodystrophy
MedGen UID:
332940
Concept ID:
C1837756
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type B lipodystrophy (MADB) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by postnatal growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies such as mandibular hypoplasia, skeletal anomalies such as progressive osteolysis of the terminal phalanges and clavicles, and skin changes such as mottled hyperpigmentation and atrophy. The lipodystrophy is characterized by generalized loss of subcutaneous fat involving the face, trunk, and extremities. Some patients have a progeroid appearance. Metabolic complications associated with insulin resistance have been reported (Schrander-Stumpel et al., 1992; summary by Simha et al., 2003). For a general phenotypic description of lipodystrophy associated with mandibuloacral dysplasia, see MADA (248370).
Xeroderma pigmentosum variant type
MedGen UID:
376352
Concept ID:
C1848410
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Xeroderma pigmentosum, group E
MedGen UID:
341219
Concept ID:
C1848411
Congenital Abnormality
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Exostoses-anetodermia-brachydactyly type E syndrome
MedGen UID:
338695
Concept ID:
C1851428
Disease or Syndrome
An association reported in a single kindred characterized by the variable presence of the following features: anetodermia (macular atrophy of the skin), multiple exostoses, and brachydactyly type E. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1985.
Poikiloderma with neutropenia
MedGen UID:
388129
Concept ID:
C1858723
Disease or Syndrome
Poikiloderma with neutropenia (PN) is characterized by an inflammatory eczematous rash (ages 6-12 months) followed by post-inflammatory poikiloderma (age >2 years) and chronic noncyclic neutropenia typically associated with recurrent sinopulmonary infections in the first two years of life and (often) bronchiectasis. There is increased risk for myelodysplastic syndrome and, rarely, acute myelogenous leukemia. Other ectodermal findings include nail dystrophy and palmar/plantar hyperkeratosis. Most affected individuals also have reactive airway disease and some have short stature, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, midfacial retrusion, calcinosis cutis, and non-healing skin ulcers.
ADULT syndrome
MedGen UID:
400232
Concept ID:
C1863204
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Acroosteolysis-keloid-like lesions-premature aging syndrome
MedGen UID:
400936
Concept ID:
C1866182
Disease or Syndrome
Penttinen syndrome (PENTT) is characterized by a prematurely aged appearance involving lipoatrophy and epidermal and dermal atrophy, as well as hypertrophic lesions that resemble scars, thin hair, proptosis, underdeveloped cheekbones, and marked acroosteolysis (Johnston et al., 2015).
XFE progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
410064
Concept ID:
C1970416
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal recessive condition caused by mutation(s) in the ERCC4 gene, encoding DNA repair endonuclease XPF. it is characterized by characterized by cutaneous photosensitivity and progeroid features in multiple organ systems.
Xeroderma pigmentosum, group C
MedGen UID:
416702
Concept ID:
C2752147
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Mandibular hypoplasia-deafness-progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
811623
Concept ID:
C3715192
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibular hypoplasia, deafness, progeroid features, and lipodystrophy syndrome (MDPL) is an autosomal dominant systemic disorder characterized by prominent loss of subcutaneous fat, a characteristic facial appearance, and metabolic abnormalities including insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Sensorineural deafness occurs late in the first or second decades of life (summary by Weedon et al., 2013).
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex 6, generalized, with scarring and hair loss
MedGen UID:
934598
Concept ID:
C4310631
Disease or Syndrome
Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some instances) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. EBS is distinguished from other types of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) or non-EB skin fragility syndromes by the location of the blistering in relation to the dermal-epidermal junction. In EBS, blistering occurs within basal keratinocytes. The severity of blistering ranges from limited to hands and feet to widespread involvement. Additional features can include hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles (keratoderma), nail dystrophy, milia, and hyper- and/or hypopigmentation. Rare EBS subtypes have been associated with additional clinical features including pyloric atresia, muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, and/or nephropathy.
Dyskeratosis congenita, autosomal dominant 1
MedGen UID:
1645250
Concept ID:
C4551974
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Rothmund-Thomson syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
1684753
Concept ID:
C5203410
Disease or Syndrome
Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is characterized by a rash that progresses to poikiloderma; sparse hair, eyelashes, and/or eyebrows; small size; skeletal and dental abnormalities; juvenile cataracts; and an increased risk for cancer, especially osteosarcoma. A variety of benign and malignant hematologic abnormalities have been reported in affected individuals. The rash of RTS typically develops between ages three and six months (occasionally as late as age two years) as erythema, swelling, and blistering on the face, subsequently spreading to the buttocks and extremities. The rash evolves over months to years into the chronic pattern of reticulated hypo- and hyperpigmentation, telangiectasias, and punctate atrophy (collectively known as poikiloderma) that persist throughout life. Hyperkeratotic lesions occur in approximately one third of individuals. Skeletal abnormalities can include radial ray defects, ulnar defects, absent or hypoplastic patella, and osteopenia.
Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type A lipodystrophy
MedGen UID:
1757618
Concept ID:
C5399785
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibuloacral dysplasia with type A lipodystrophy (MADA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, craniofacial anomalies with mandibular hypoplasia, skeletal abnormalities with progressive osteolysis of the distal phalanges and clavicles, and pigmentary skin changes. The lipodystrophy is characterized by a marked acral loss of fatty tissue with normal or increased fatty tissue in the neck and trunk. Some patients may show progeroid features. Metabolic complications can arise due to insulin resistance and diabetes (Young et al., 1971; Simha and Garg, 2002; summary by Garavelli et al., 2009). See also MAD type B (MADB; 608612), which is caused by mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene (606480).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Rich MD, Mazloom SE, Sorenson TJ, Phillips MA
Dermatol Online J 2021 Sep 15;27(9) doi: 10.5070/D327955112. PMID: 34755973
Graham JS, Schoneboom BA
Chem Biol Interact 2013 Dec 5;206(3):512-22. Epub 2013 Jun 28 doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2013.06.013. PMID: 23816402
Eichenfield LF, Beck L
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2003 May;111(5):1153-68. doi: 10.1067/mai.2003.1492. PMID: 12743593

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Rich MD, Mazloom SE, Sorenson TJ, Phillips MA
Dermatol Online J 2021 Sep 15;27(9) doi: 10.5070/D327955112. PMID: 34755973
Chung CL, Lawrence I, Hoffman M, Elgindi D, Nadhan K, Potnis M, Jin A, Sershon C, Binnebose R, Lorenzini A, Sell C
Geroscience 2019 Dec;41(6):861-869. Epub 2019 Nov 25 doi: 10.1007/s11357-019-00113-y. PMID: 31761958Free PMC Article
Mason AR, Mason J, Cork M, Dooley G, Hancock H
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Mar 28;(3):CD005028. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005028.pub3. PMID: 23543539
Chun SG, Shaeffer DS, Bryant-Greenwood PK
Hawaii Med J 2011 Mar;70(3):52-5. PMID: 21365542Free PMC Article
Charles MW
J Radiol Prot 2007 Sep;27(3):231-52. Epub 2007 Aug 29 doi: 10.1088/0952-4746/27/3/R01. PMID: 17768326

Diagnosis

Kordeva S, Broshtilova V, Batashki I, Tchernev G
Georgian Med News 2023 Jul-Aug;(340-341):227-231. PMID: 37805902
Llamas-Velasco M, Muñoz-Aceituno E, Sánchez-Pérez J, Camarero-Mulas C, Fraga J, Aragüés M
J Cutan Pathol 2022 Apr;49(4):373-376. Epub 2021 Nov 22 doi: 10.1111/cup.14162. PMID: 34743349
Ranosz-Janicka I, Lis-Święty A, Skrzypek-Salamon A, Brzezińska-Wcisło L
Skin Res Technol 2019 May;25(3):359-366. Epub 2019 Jan 14 doi: 10.1111/srt.12660. PMID: 30638285
Ranosz-Janicka I, Lis-Święty A, Skrzypek-Salamon A, Brzezińska-Wcisło L
Skin Res Technol 2019 Mar;25(2):118-123. Epub 2018 Jul 21 doi: 10.1111/srt.12619. PMID: 30030915
Pérez-López FR, Ceausu I, Depypere H, Erel CT, Lambrinoudaki I, Rees M, Schenck-Gustafsson K, Tremollieres F, van der Schouw YT, Simoncini T; EMAS, Spanish Menopause society
Maturitas 2013 Mar;74(3):279-82. Epub 2013 Jan 3 doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2012.12.006. PMID: 23291001

Therapy

Chung CL, Lawrence I, Hoffman M, Elgindi D, Nadhan K, Potnis M, Jin A, Sershon C, Binnebose R, Lorenzini A, Sell C
Geroscience 2019 Dec;41(6):861-869. Epub 2019 Nov 25 doi: 10.1007/s11357-019-00113-y. PMID: 31761958Free PMC Article
Small R
Am Fam Physician 2014 Aug 1;90(3):168-75. PMID: 25077722
Mason AR, Mason J, Cork M, Dooley G, Hancock H
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Mar 28;(3):CD005028. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005028.pub3. PMID: 23543539
Fabi SG, Goldman MP
Dermatol Surg 2012 Jul;38(7 Pt 2):1112-27. Epub 2012 Jan 23 doi: 10.1111/j.1524-4725.2011.02291.x. PMID: 22268976
Charles MW
J Radiol Prot 2007 Sep;27(3):231-52. Epub 2007 Aug 29 doi: 10.1088/0952-4746/27/3/R01. PMID: 17768326

Prognosis

Garcia-Segura LC, Garcia-Segura JC, Delgado DC, Romero MN, Salgado EC, Llorens LP
Int J Pharm Compd 2022 Jan-Feb;26(1):6-8. PMID: 35081038
Ranosz-Janicka I, Lis-Święty A, Skrzypek-Salamon A, Brzezińska-Wcisło L
Skin Res Technol 2019 May;25(3):359-366. Epub 2019 Jan 14 doi: 10.1111/srt.12660. PMID: 30638285
Ranosz-Janicka I, Lis-Święty A, Skrzypek-Salamon A, Brzezińska-Wcisło L
Skin Res Technol 2019 Mar;25(2):118-123. Epub 2018 Jul 21 doi: 10.1111/srt.12619. PMID: 30030915
Small R
Am Fam Physician 2014 Aug 1;90(3):168-75. PMID: 25077722
Nghiem P, Pearson G, Langley RG
J Am Acad Dermatol 2002 Feb;46(2):228-41. doi: 10.1067/mjd.2002.120942. PMID: 11807435

Clinical prediction guides

Chung CL, Lawrence I, Hoffman M, Elgindi D, Nadhan K, Potnis M, Jin A, Sershon C, Binnebose R, Lorenzini A, Sell C
Geroscience 2019 Dec;41(6):861-869. Epub 2019 Nov 25 doi: 10.1007/s11357-019-00113-y. PMID: 31761958Free PMC Article
Ranosz-Janicka I, Lis-Święty A, Skrzypek-Salamon A, Brzezińska-Wcisło L
Skin Res Technol 2019 Mar;25(2):118-123. Epub 2018 Jul 21 doi: 10.1111/srt.12619. PMID: 30030915
Small R
Am Fam Physician 2014 Aug 1;90(3):168-75. PMID: 25077722
Charles MW
J Radiol Prot 2007 Sep;27(3):231-52. Epub 2007 Aug 29 doi: 10.1088/0952-4746/27/3/R01. PMID: 17768326
Eichenfield LF, Beck L
J Allergy Clin Immunol 2003 May;111(5):1153-68. doi: 10.1067/mai.2003.1492. PMID: 12743593

Recent systematic reviews

Mason AR, Mason J, Cork M, Dooley G, Hancock H
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Mar 28;(3):CD005028. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD005028.pub3. PMID: 23543539

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