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Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIw(CDG2W)

MedGen UID:
1794196
Concept ID:
C5561986
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type IIw
 
Gene (location): SLC37A4 (11q23.3)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0030437
OMIM®: 619525

Definition

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIw (CDG2W) is an autosomal dominant metabolic disorder characterized by liver dysfunction, coagulation deficiencies, and profound abnormalities in N-glycosylation of serum specific proteins. All reported patients carry the same mutation (602671.0017) (summary by Ng et al., 2021). For an overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation, see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066). [from OMIM]

Clinical features

From HPO
Microscopic hematuria
MedGen UID:
65997
Concept ID:
C0239937
Finding
Microscopic hematuria detected by dipstick or microscopic examination of the urine.
Moderate albuminuria
MedGen UID:
896933
Concept ID:
C1654921
Finding
The presence of moderately increased concentrations of albumin in the urine, defined as and albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) of 30 to 299 mg/gm (3.4 to 34 mg/mmol).
Pes planus
MedGen UID:
42034
Concept ID:
C0016202
Anatomical Abnormality
A foot where the longitudinal arch of the foot is in contact with the ground or floor when the individual is standing; or, in a patient lying supine, a foot where the arch is in contact with the surface of a flat board pressed against the sole of the foot by the examiner with a pressure similar to that expected from weight bearing; or, the height of the arch is reduced.
Ventricular septal defect
MedGen UID:
42366
Concept ID:
C0018818
Congenital Abnormality
A hole between the two bottom chambers (ventricles) of the heart. The defect is centered around the most superior aspect of the ventricular septum.
Tetralogy of Fallot
MedGen UID:
21498
Concept ID:
C0039685
Congenital Abnormality
Some people with treated CCHD have few related health problems later in life. However, long-term effects of CCHD can include delayed development and reduced stamina during exercise. Adults with these heart defects have an increased risk of abnormal heart rhythms, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, and premature death.\n\nAlthough babies with CCHD may appear healthy for the first few hours or days of life, signs and symptoms soon become apparent. These can include an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur), rapid breathing (tachypnea), low blood pressure (hypotension), low levels of oxygen in the blood (hypoxemia), and a blue or purple tint to the skin caused by a shortage of oxygen (cyanosis). If untreated, CCHD can lead to shock, coma, and death. However, most people with CCHD now survive past infancy due to improvements in early detection, diagnosis, and treatment.\n\nCritical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a group of serious heart defects that are present from birth. These abnormalities result from problems with the formation of one or more parts of the heart during the early stages of embryonic development. CCHD prevents the heart from pumping blood effectively or reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood. As a result, organs and tissues throughout the body do not receive enough oxygen, which can lead to organ damage and life-threatening complications. Individuals with CCHD usually require surgery soon after birth.\n\nPeople with CCHD have one or more specific heart defects. The heart defects classified as CCHD include coarctation of the aorta, double-outlet right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries, Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, interrupted aortic arch, pulmonary atresia with intact septum, single ventricle, total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, tetralogy of Fallot, tricuspid atresia, and truncus arteriosus.\n\nEach of the heart defects associated with CCHD affects the flow of blood into, out of, or through the heart. Some of the heart defects involve structures within the heart itself, such as the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) or the valves that control blood flow through the heart. Others affect the structure of the large blood vessels leading into and out of the heart (including the aorta and pulmonary artery). Still others involve a combination of these structural abnormalities.
Failure to thrive
MedGen UID:
746019
Concept ID:
C2315100
Disease or Syndrome
Failure to thrive (FTT) refers to a child whose physical growth is substantially below the norm.
Hepatomegaly
MedGen UID:
42428
Concept ID:
C0019209
Finding
Abnormally increased size of the liver.
Vomiting
MedGen UID:
12124
Concept ID:
C0042963
Sign or Symptom
Forceful ejection of the contents of the stomach through the mouth by means of a series of involuntary spasmic contractions.
Bile duct proliferation
MedGen UID:
120603
Concept ID:
C0267818
Disease or Syndrome
Proliferative changes of the bile ducts.
Prolonged neonatal jaundice
MedGen UID:
347108
Concept ID:
C1859236
Finding
Neonatal jaundice refers to a yellowing of the skin and other tissues of a newborn infant as a result of increased concentrations of bilirubin in the blood. Neonatal jaundice affects over half of all newborns to some extent in the first week of life. Prolonged neonatal jaundice is said to be present if the jaundice persists for longer than 14 days in term infants and 21 days in preterm infants.
Hepatic steatosis
MedGen UID:
398225
Concept ID:
C2711227
Disease or Syndrome
Steatosis is a term used to denote lipid accumulation within hepatocytes.
Gastroesophageal reflux
MedGen UID:
1368658
Concept ID:
C4317146
Finding
A condition in which the stomach contents leak backwards from the stomach into the esophagus through the lower esophageal sphincter.
Increased hepatic echogenicity
MedGen UID:
1382460
Concept ID:
C4477000
Finding
Increased echogenicity of liver tissue on sonography, manifested as an increased amount of white on the screen of the sonography device.
Low-set ears
MedGen UID:
65980
Concept ID:
C0239234
Congenital Abnormality
Upper insertion of the ear to the scalp below an imaginary horizontal line drawn between the inner canthi of the eye and extending posteriorly to the ear.
Delayed ability to walk
MedGen UID:
66034
Concept ID:
C0241726
Finding
A failure to achieve the ability to walk at an appropriate developmental stage. Most children learn to walk in a series of stages, and learn to walk short distances independently between 12 and 15 months.
Anemia
MedGen UID:
1526
Concept ID:
C0002871
Disease or Syndrome
A reduction in erythrocytes volume or hemoglobin concentration.
Factor XII deficiency disease
MedGen UID:
8772
Concept ID:
C0015526
Disease or Syndrome
Decreased activity of coagulation factor XII. Factor XII (fXII) is part of the intrinsic coagulation pathway and binds to exposed collagen at site of vessel wall injury, activated by high-MW kininogen and kallikrein, thereby initiating the coagulation cascade.
Thrombocytopenia
MedGen UID:
52737
Concept ID:
C0040034
Disease or Syndrome
A reduction in the number of circulating thrombocytes.
Prolonged partial thromboplastin time
MedGen UID:
66815
Concept ID:
C0240671
Finding
Increased time to coagulation in the partial thromboplastin time (PTT) test, a measure of the intrinsic and common coagulation pathways. Phospholipid, and activator, and calcium are mixed into an anticoagulated plasma sample, and the time is measured until a thrombus forms.
Hereditary antithrombin deficiency
MedGen UID:
75781
Concept ID:
C0272375
Disease or Syndrome
Deficiency of antithrombin III is a major risk factor for venous thromboembolic disease. Two categories of AT-III deficiency have been defined on the basis of AT-III antigen levels in the plasma of affected individuals. The majority of AT-III deficiency families belong in the type I (classic) deficiency group and have a quantitatively abnormal phenotype in which antigen and heparin cofactor levels are both reduced to about 50% of normal. The second category of AT-III deficiency has been termed type II (functional) deficiency. Affected individuals from these kindreds produce dysfunctional AT-III molecules; they have reduced heparin cofactor activity levels (about 50% of normal) but levels of AT-III antigen are often normal or nearly normal (summary by Bock and Prochownik, 1987). The 2 categories of antithrombmin III deficiency have been classified further. Type I (low functional and immunologic antithrombin) has been subdivided into subtype Ia (reduced levels of normal antithrombin), and type Ib (reduced levels of antithrombin and the presence of low levels of a variant). Type II (low functional but normal immunologic antithrombin) has been subdivided into subtype IIa (functional abnormalities affecting both the reactive site and the heparin-binding site of AT3); subtype IIb (functional abnormalities limited to the reactive site); and subtype IIc (functional abnormalities limited to the heparin-binding site) (summary by Lane et al., 1992).
Hypofibrinogenemia
MedGen UID:
107511
Concept ID:
C0553681
Disease or Syndrome
Decreased concentration of fibrinogen in the blood.
Prolonged prothrombin time
MedGen UID:
208879
Concept ID:
C0853225
Finding
Increased time to coagulation in the prothrombin time test, which is a measure of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. The results of the prothrombin time test are often expressed in terms of the International normalized ratio (INR), which is calculated as a ratio of the patient's prothrombin time (PT) to a control PT standardized for the potency of the thromboplastin reagent developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) using the formula
Bleeding with minor or no trauma
MedGen UID:
868738
Concept ID:
C4023143
Finding
Significant bleeding or hemorrhage without significant precipitating factor.
Reduced factor IX activity
MedGen UID:
868754
Concept ID:
C4023159
Finding
Decreased activity of coagulation factor IX. Factor IX, which itself is activated by factor Xa or factor VIIa to form factor IXa, activates factor X into factor Xa.
Reduced factor XIII activity
MedGen UID:
870254
Concept ID:
C4024692
Finding
Decreased activity of coagulation factor XIII (also known as fibrin stabilizing factor). Activated Factor XIII cross-links fibrin polymers solidifying the clot.
Reduced factor VII activity
MedGen UID:
892851
Concept ID:
C4024722
Finding
Reduced activity of coagulation factor VII. Factor VII is part of the extrinsic coagulation pathway, which is initiated at the site of injury in response to the release of tissue factor (fIII). Tissue factor and activated factor VII catalyze the activation of factor X.
Reduced factor XI activity
MedGen UID:
1368629
Concept ID:
C4317093
Finding
Decreased activity of coagulation factor XI. Factor XI, also known as plasma thromboplastin antecedent, is a serine proteinase that activates factor IX.
Factor V deficiency
MedGen UID:
1369551
Concept ID:
C4317320
Disease or Syndrome
Factor V Leiden thrombophilia is characterized by a poor anticoagulant response to activated protein C (APC) and an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is the most common VTE, with the legs being the most common site. Thrombosis in unusual locations is less common. Evidence suggests that heterozygosity for the Leiden variant has at most a modest effect on risk for recurrent thrombosis after initial treatment of a first VTE. It is unlikely that factor V Leiden thrombophilia (i.e., heterozygosity or homozygosity for the Leiden variant) is a major factor contributing to pregnancy loss and other adverse pregnancy outcomes (preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and placental abruption). The clinical expression of factor V Leiden thrombophilia is influenced by the following: The number of Leiden variants (heterozygotes have a slightly increased risk for venous thrombosis; homozygotes have a much greater thrombotic risk). Coexisting genetic thrombophilic disorders, which have a supra-additive effect on overall thrombotic risk. Acquired thrombophilic disorders: antiphospholipid antibody (APLA) syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, myeloproliferative disorders, and increased levels of clotting factors. Circumstantial risk factors including but not limited to pregnancy, central venous catheters, travel, combined oral contraceptive (COC) use and other combined contraceptives, oral hormone replacement therapy (HRT), selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), obesity, leg injury, and advancing age.
Microcytic anemia
MedGen UID:
1673948
Concept ID:
C5194182
Disease or Syndrome
A kind of anemia in which the volume of the red blood cells is reduced.
Inguinal hernia
MedGen UID:
6817
Concept ID:
C0019294
Finding
Protrusion of the contents of the abdominal cavity through the inguinal canal.
Micrognathia
MedGen UID:
44428
Concept ID:
C0025990
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental hypoplasia of the mandible.
Hypotonia
MedGen UID:
10133
Concept ID:
C0026827
Finding
Hypotonia is an abnormally low muscle tone (the amount of tension or resistance to movement in a muscle). Even when relaxed, muscles have a continuous and passive partial contraction which provides some resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia thus manifests as diminished resistance to passive stretching. Hypotonia is not the same as muscle weakness, although the two conditions can co-exist.
Osteoporosis
MedGen UID:
14535
Concept ID:
C0029456
Disease or Syndrome
Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone density and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue with a consequent increase in bone fragility. According to the WHO criteria, osteoporosis is defined as a BMD that lies 2.5 standard deviations or more below the average value for young healthy adults (a T-score below -2.5 SD).
Scoliosis
MedGen UID:
11348
Concept ID:
C0036439
Disease or Syndrome
The presence of an abnormal lateral curvature of the spine.
Pectus carinatum
MedGen UID:
57643
Concept ID:
C0158731
Finding
A deformity of the chest caused by overgrowth of the ribs and characterized by protrusion of the sternum.
Narrow chest
MedGen UID:
96528
Concept ID:
C0426790
Finding
Reduced width of the chest from side to side, associated with a reduced distance from the sternal notch to the tip of the shoulder.
Pectus excavatum
MedGen UID:
781174
Concept ID:
C2051831
Finding
A defect of the chest wall characterized by a depression of the sternum, giving the chest ("pectus") a caved-in ("excavatum") appearance.
Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis
MedGen UID:
9033
Concept ID:
C0017662
Disease or Syndrome
A type of glomerulonephritis characterized by diffuse mesangial cell proliferation and the thickening of capillary walls due to subendothelial extension of the mesangium. The term membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis is often employed to denote a general pattern of glomerular injury seen in a variety of disease processes that share a common pathogenetic mechanism, rather than to describe a single disease entity
Splenomegaly
MedGen UID:
52469
Concept ID:
C0038002
Finding
Abnormal increased size of the spleen.
Recurrent otitis media
MedGen UID:
155436
Concept ID:
C0747085
Disease or Syndrome
Increased susceptibility to otitis media, as manifested by recurrent episodes of otitis media.
Diabetes mellitus type 1
MedGen UID:
41522
Concept ID:
C0011854
Disease or Syndrome
Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), also designated insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), is a disorder of glucose homeostasis characterized by susceptibility to ketoacidosis in the absence of insulin therapy. It is a genetically heterogeneous autoimmune disease affecting about 0.3% of Caucasian populations (Todd, 1990). Genetic studies of T1D have focused on the identification of loci associated with increased susceptibility to this multifactorial phenotype. The classic phenotype of diabetes mellitus is polydipsia, polyphagia, and polyuria which result from hyperglycemia-induced osmotic diuresis and secondary thirst. These derangements result in long-term complications that affect the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels.
Elevated circulating aspartate aminotransferase concentration
MedGen UID:
57497
Concept ID:
C0151904
Finding
An abnormally high concentration in the circulation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST).
Elevated circulating alanine aminotransferase concentration
MedGen UID:
57740
Concept ID:
C0151905
Finding
An abnormally high concentration in the circulation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT).
Elevated circulating alkaline phosphatase concentration
MedGen UID:
727252
Concept ID:
C1314665
Finding
Abnormally increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase activity.
Elevated hepatic transaminase
MedGen UID:
338525
Concept ID:
C1848701
Finding
Elevations of the levels of SGOT and SGPT in the serum. SGOT (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase) and SGPT (serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase) are transaminases primarily found in the liver and heart and are released into the bloodstream as the result of liver or heart damage. SGOT and SGPT are used clinically mainly as markers of liver damage.
Type II transferrin isoform profile
MedGen UID:
892666
Concept ID:
C4021094
Finding
Abnormal transferrin isoform profile consistent with a type II congenital disorder of glycosylation.
Abnormal protein O-linked glycosylation
MedGen UID:
868534
Concept ID:
C4022933
Anatomical Abnormality
An anomaly of protein O-linked glycosylation, i.e., of the process in which a carbohydrate or carbohydrate derivative unit is added to a protein via the hydroxyl group of a serine or threonine residue.
Abnormal protein N-linked glycosylation
MedGen UID:
868545
Concept ID:
C4022944
Finding
An anomaly of protein N-linked glycosylation, i.e., an abnormality of the protein glycosylation process in which a carbohydrate or carbohydrate derivative unit is added to a protein via a nitrogen atom in an amino acid residue in a protein.
Elevated gamma-glutamyltransferase level
MedGen UID:
1370086
Concept ID:
C4476869
Finding
Increased level of the enzyme gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). GGT is mainly present in kidney, liver, and pancreatic cells, but small amounts are present in other tissues.
Teeth, supernumerary
MedGen UID:
21210
Concept ID:
C0040457
Anatomical Abnormality
The presence of one or more teeth additional to the normal number.
Ankyloglossia
MedGen UID:
56288
Concept ID:
C0152415
Congenital Abnormality
Ankyloglossia, commonly known as 'tongue-tie,' is a congenital anomaly that occurs predominantly in males and is characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum. The phenotype varies from absence of clinical significance to rare complete ankyloglossia where the ventral part of the tongue is fused to the floor of the mouth (Klockars, 2007). Some patients also exhibit absence of lower incisors (Acevedo et al., 2010).
Concave nasal ridge
MedGen UID:
78105
Concept ID:
C0264169
Finding
Nasal ridge curving posteriorly to an imaginary line that connects the nasal root and tip.
Wide nose
MedGen UID:
140869
Concept ID:
C0426421
Finding
Interalar distance more than two standard deviations above the mean for age, i.e., an apparently increased width of the nasal base and alae.
Facial asymmetry
MedGen UID:
266298
Concept ID:
C1306710
Finding
An abnormal difference between the left and right sides of the face.
Underdeveloped nasal alae
MedGen UID:
322332
Concept ID:
C1834055
Congenital Abnormality
Thinned, deficient, or excessively arched ala nasi.
Narrow face
MedGen UID:
373334
Concept ID:
C1837463
Finding
Bizygomatic (upper face) and bigonial (lower face) width are both more than 2 standard deviations below the mean (objective); or, an apparent reduction in the width of the upper and lower face (subjective).
Pointed chin
MedGen UID:
336193
Concept ID:
C1844505
Finding
A marked tapering of the lower face to the chin.
Bilateral choanal atresia
MedGen UID:
870857
Concept ID:
C4025317
Congenital Abnormality
Bilateral absence (atresia) of the posterior nasal aperture (choana).
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (see 300000), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.

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