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Discoid lupus rash

MedGen UID:
1811126
Concept ID:
C5574816
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: Discoid lupus erythematosus
SNOMED CT: Discoid lupus erythematosus (200938002); DLE - Discoid lupus erythematosus (200938002); LE - Discoid lupus erythematosus (200938002)
 
HPO: HP:0007417
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0019558
Orphanet: ORPHA90281

Definition

Cutaneous lesion that develops as a dry, scaly, red patch that evolves to an indurated and hyperpigmented plaque with adherent scale. Scarring may result in central white patches (loss of pigmentation) and skin atrophy. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • Discoid lupus erythematosus

Conditions with this feature

Granulomatous disease, chronic, X-linked
MedGen UID:
336165
Concept ID:
C1844376
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 2
MedGen UID:
383869
Concept ID:
C1856245
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 1
MedGen UID:
341102
Concept ID:
C1856251
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-negative
MedGen UID:
383872
Concept ID:
C1856255
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Complement component C1r/C1s deficiency
MedGen UID:
461624
Concept ID:
C3150274
Disease or Syndrome
Lack of production of either functional C1r or C1s protein, due to a genetic defect. Approximately 60% of patients with a C1r/C1s deficiency will develop a severe systemic lupus erythematosus at an early age. Patients also present with frequent sinopulmonary infections often with Streptococcus pneumoniae.
C1Q deficiency 2
MedGen UID:
1841058
Concept ID:
C5830422
Disease or Syndrome
C1q deficiency (C1QD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent skin lesions, chronic infections, and an increased risk of autoimmune diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; see 152700) or SLE-like diseases. It has also been associated with chronic glomerulonephritis and renal failure. C1q deficiency presents in 2 different forms, absent C1q protein or presence of a dysfunctional molecule (summary by Topaloglu et al., 1996 and Vassallo et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of C1q deficiency, see 613652.
C1Q deficiency 3
MedGen UID:
1841059
Concept ID:
C5830423
Disease or Syndrome
C1q deficiency (C1QD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent skin lesions, chronic infections, and an increased risk of autoimmune diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; see 152700) or SLE-like diseases. It has also been associated with chronic glomerulonephritis and renal failure. C1q deficiency presents in 2 different forms, absent C1q protein or presence of a dysfunctional molecule (summary by Topaloglu et al., 1996 and Vassallo et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of C1q deficiency, see 613652.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Lazaro D
Drugs Aging 2007;24(9):701-15. doi: 10.2165/00002512-200724090-00001. PMID: 17727302

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Wu YL, Brookshire BP, Verani RR, Arnett FC, Yu CY
Lupus 2011 Oct;20(11):1126-34. Epub 2011 Jul 22 doi: 10.1177/0961203311404914. PMID: 21784777

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