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Prolonged QTc interval

MedGen UID:
294666
Concept ID:
C1560305
Pathologic Function
HPO: HP:0005184

Definition

A longer than normal interval (corrected for heart rate) between the Q and T waves in the heart's cycle. Prolonged QTc can cause premature action potentials during late phase depolarizations thereby leading to ventricular arrhythmias and ventricular fibrillations. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • Prolonged QTc interval

Conditions with this feature

Rett syndrome
MedGen UID:
48441
Concept ID:
C0035372
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of MECP2-related phenotypes in females ranges from classic Rett syndrome to variant Rett syndrome with a broader clinical phenotype (either milder or more severe than classic Rett syndrome) to mild learning disabilities; the spectrum in males ranges from severe neonatal encephalopathy to pyramidal signs, parkinsonism, and macroorchidism (PPM-X) syndrome to severe syndromic/nonsyndromic intellectual disability. Females: Classic Rett syndrome, a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting girls, is characterized by apparently normal psychomotor development during the first six to 18 months of life, followed by a short period of developmental stagnation, then rapid regression in language and motor skills, followed by long-term stability. During the phase of rapid regression, repetitive, stereotypic hand movements replace purposeful hand use. Additional findings include fits of screaming and inconsolable crying, autistic features, panic-like attacks, bruxism, episodic apnea and/or hyperpnea, gait ataxia and apraxia, tremors, seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Males: Severe neonatal-onset encephalopathy, the most common phenotype in affected males, is characterized by a relentless clinical course that follows a metabolic-degenerative type of pattern, abnormal tone, involuntary movements, severe seizures, and breathing abnormalities. Death often occurs before age two years.
Andersen Tawil syndrome
MedGen UID:
327586
Concept ID:
C1563715
Disease or Syndrome
Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is characterized by a triad of: episodic flaccid muscle weakness (i.e., periodic paralysis); ventricular arrhythmias and prolonged QT interval; and anomalies including low-set ears, widely spaced eyes, small mandible, fifth-digit clinodactyly, syndactyly, short stature, and scoliosis. Affected individuals present in the first or second decade with either cardiac symptoms (palpitations and/or syncope) or weakness that occurs spontaneously following prolonged rest or following rest after exertion. Mild permanent weakness is common. Mild learning difficulties and a distinct neurocognitive phenotype (i.e., deficits in executive function and abstract reasoning) have been described.
Timothy syndrome
MedGen UID:
331395
Concept ID:
C1832916
Disease or Syndrome
The first identified CACNA1C-related disorder, referred to as Timothy syndrome, consists of the combination of prolonged QT interval, autism, and cardiovascular malformation with syndactyly of the fingers and toes. Infrequent findings also include developmental and speech delay, seizures, and recurrent infections. With increased availability of molecular genetic testing, a wider spectrum of pathogenic variants and clinical findings associated with CACNA1C-related disorders has been recognized. Because CACNA1C is associated with calcium channel function, all individuals with a pathogenic variant in this gene are at risk for cardiac arrhythmia of a specific type. The clinical manifestations of a CACNA1C-related disorder include three phenotypes: Timothy syndrome with or without syndactyly. QT prolongation (QTc >480 ms) and arrhythmias in the absence of other syndromic features. Short QT syndrome (QTc <350 ms) or Brugada syndrome with short QT interval. These three phenotypes can be separated into two broad categories on the basis of the functional consequences of the pathogenic variants in CACNA1C: QT prolongation with or without a Timothy syndrome-associated phenotype associated with pathogenic variants inducing a gain of function at the cellular level (i.e., increased calcium current). Short QT interval with or without Brugada syndrome EKG pattern associated with pathogenic variants causing loss of function (i.e., reduced calcium current).
Sick sinus syndrome 2, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
320273
Concept ID:
C1834144
Disease or Syndrome
Sick sinus syndrome (also known as sinus node dysfunction) is a group of related heart conditions that can affect how the heart beats. "Sick sinus" refers to the sino-atrial (SA) node, which is an area of specialized cells in the heart that functions as a natural pacemaker. The SA node generates electrical impulses that start each heartbeat. These signals travel from the SA node to the rest of the heart, signaling the heart (cardiac) muscle to contract and pump blood. In people with sick sinus syndrome, the SA node does not function normally. In some cases, it does not produce the right signals to trigger a regular heartbeat. In others, abnormalities disrupt the electrical impulses and prevent them from reaching the rest of the heart.\n\nSick sinus syndrome tends to cause the heartbeat to be too slow (bradycardia), although occasionally the heartbeat is too fast (tachycardia). In some cases, the heartbeat rapidly switches from being too fast to being too slow, a condition known as tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome. Symptoms related to abnormal heartbeats can include dizziness, light-headedness, fainting (syncope), a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), and confusion or memory problems. During exercise, many affected individuals experience chest pain, difficulty breathing, or excessive tiredness (fatigue). Once symptoms of sick sinus syndrome appear, they usually worsen with time. However, some people with the condition never experience any related health problems.\n\nSick sinus syndrome occurs most commonly in older adults, although it can be diagnosed in people of any age. The condition increases the risk of several life-threatening problems involving the heart and blood vessels. These include a heart rhythm abnormality called atrial fibrillation, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and stroke.
Atrial fibrillation, familial, 3
MedGen UID:
373232
Concept ID:
C1837014
Disease or Syndrome
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583.
Long QT syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
349087
Concept ID:
C1859062
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Long QT syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
358092
Concept ID:
C1867904
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Atrial fibrillation, familial, 7
MedGen UID:
393658
Concept ID:
C2677106
Disease or Syndrome
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583.
Long QT syndrome 11
MedGen UID:
437218
Concept ID:
C2678483
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Long QT syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
442824
Concept ID:
C2751830
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Long QT syndrome 13
MedGen UID:
462083
Concept ID:
C3150733
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Long QT syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
462293
Concept ID:
C3150943
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Long QT syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
462303
Concept ID:
C3150953
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Atrial fibrillation, familial, 9
MedGen UID:
462781
Concept ID:
C3151431
Disease or Syndrome
Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583.
Atrial conduction disease
MedGen UID:
863722
Concept ID:
C4015285
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic cardiac disease characterized by variably expressed atrial tachyarrhythmia (such as atrial flutter, paroxysmal or chronic atrial fibrillation, ectopic atrial tachycardia, or multifocal atrial tachycardia), infra-Hisian conduction system disease, and vulnerability to dilated cardiomyopathy. Age of onset ranges between childhood and adulthood.
Long QT syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
864108
Concept ID:
C4015671
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Long QT syndrome 15
MedGen UID:
864132
Concept ID:
C4015695
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 26
MedGen UID:
934716
Concept ID:
C4310749
Disease or Syndrome
Familial cardiomyopathy caused by mutation in the FLNC gene has been described as hypertrophic, restrictive, dilated, or arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Affected individuals, especially those with dilated cardiomyopathy, are at risk for arrhythmias and sudden death. Arrhythmias without cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, have also been reported (Ortiz-Genga et al., 2016; Verdonschot et al., 2020).
Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1646925
Concept ID:
C4551509
Disease or Syndrome
Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) is characterized by congenital profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and long QTc, usually >500 msec. Prolongation of the QTc interval is associated with tachyarrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia, episodes of torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation, which may culminate in syncope or sudden death. Iron-deficient anemia and elevated levels of gastrin are also frequent features of JLNS. The classic presentation of JLNS is a deaf child who experiences syncopal episodes during periods of stress, exercise, or fright. Fifty percent of individuals with JLNS had cardiac events before age three years. More than half of untreated children with JLNS die before age 15 years.
Long QT syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1641146
Concept ID:
C4551647
Disease or Syndrome
Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac electrophysiologic disorder, characterized by QT prolongation and T-wave abnormalities on the EKG that are associated with tachyarrhythmias, typically the ventricular tachycardia torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP is usually self-terminating, thus causing a syncopal event, the most common symptom in individuals with LQTS. Such cardiac events typically occur during exercise and emotional stress, less frequently during sleep, and usually without warning. In some instances, TdP degenerates to ventricular fibrillation and causes aborted cardiac arrest (if the individual is defibrillated) or sudden death. Approximately 50% of untreated individuals with a pathogenic variant in one of the genes associated with LQTS have symptoms, usually one to a few syncopal events. While cardiac events may occur from infancy through middle age, they are most common from the preteen years through the 20s. Some types of LQTS are associated with a phenotype extending beyond cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to the prolonged QT interval, associations include muscle weakness and facial dysmorphism in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQTS type 7); hand/foot, facial, and neurodevelopmental features in Timothy syndrome (LQTS type 8); and profound sensorineural hearing loss in Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome.
Long QT syndrome 16
MedGen UID:
1713991
Concept ID:
C5394068
Disease or Syndrome
LQT16 Long QT syndrome-16 (LQT16) is characterized by a markedly prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval and 2:1 atrioventricular (AV) block, with onset in the perinatal period. Patients experience bradycardia or ventricular tachyarrhythmias that may result in syncope, cardiac arrest, and/or sudden death (Reed et al., 2015; Wren et al., 2019). Patients with LQT14 (616247), LQT15 (616249), or LQT16, resulting from mutation in calmodulin genes CALM1 (114180), CALM2 (114182), or CALM3, respectively, typically have a more severe phenotype, with earlier onset, profound QT prolongation, and a high predilection for cardiac arrest and sudden death, than patients with mutations in other genes (Boczek et al., 2016). CPVT6 Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia-6 (CPVT6) is characterized by childhood-onset syncopal episodes with exercise or stress. Electrocardiogram (ECG) shows a normal QT interval with a prominent U wave, and stress testing reveals premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) that may occur as bigeminy or couplets, and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (Gomez-Hurtado et al., 2016).
Myofibrillar myopathy 10
MedGen UID:
1769385
Concept ID:
C5436656
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-10 (MFM10) is an autosomal recessive structural muscle disorder characterized by onset of muscle pain, cramping, and exercise fatigue in the first or second decades of life. Some patients have mild contractures of the large joints apparent in early childhood. Affected individuals have a characteristic appearance of a thick neck and prominent shoulder girdle with anteverted shoulders and a tendency toward kyphosis. There is no apparent muscle weakness, but some affected individuals show progressive muscle rigidity leading to limited mobility. There is variable cardiac involvement, ranging from chest pain with left ventricular hypertrophy to subclinical signs such as abnormal EKG or elevated cardiac enzymes. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows structural abnormalities with myofibrillar disorganization and accumulation of autophagocytic vacuoles (summary by Hedberg-Oldfors et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Recurrent metabolic encephalomyopathic crises-rhabdomyolysis-cardiac arrhythmia-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798947
Concept ID:
C5567524
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with TANGO2-related metabolic encephalopathy and arrhythmias can present in acute metabolic crisis (hypoglycemia, elevated lactate, mild hyperammonemia) or with developmental delay, regression, and/or seizures. The acute presentation varies from profound muscle weakness, ataxia, and/or disorientation to a comatose state. Individuals can present with intermittent acute episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The first episode of myoglobinuria has been known to occur as early as age five months. Acute renal tubular damage due to myoglobinuria can result in acute kidney injury and renal failure. During acute illness, transient electrocardiogram changes can be seen; the most common is QT prolongation. Life-threatening recurrent ventricular tachycardia or torsade de pointes occurs primarily during times of acute illness. Individuals who do not present in metabolic crises may present with gait incoordination, progressively unsteady gait, difficulty with speech, or clumsiness. Intellectual disability of variable severity is observed in almost all individuals. Seizures are observed outside the periods of crises in more than 75% of individuals. Hypothyroidism has been reported in more than one third of individuals.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Ehlers A, Marakis G, Lampen A, Hirsch-Ernst KI
Food Chem Toxicol 2019 Aug;130:109-121. Epub 2019 May 18 doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2019.05.028. PMID: 31112702
Ries R, Sayadipour A
J Psychiatr Pract 2014 Sep;20(5):338-44. doi: 10.1097/01.pra.0000454778.29433.7c. PMID: 25226194
Martin SJ, Jung R, Garvin CG
Drug Saf 2001;24(3):199-222. doi: 10.2165/00002018-200124030-00004. PMID: 11347723

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Lee W, Vandenberk B, Raj SR, Lee SS
Gut Liver 2022 Nov 15;16(6):849-860. Epub 2022 Jul 22 doi: 10.5009/gnl210537. PMID: 35864808Free PMC Article
Salaets T, Raaijmakers A, Zhang ZY, Yu YL, Wei DM, Staessen JA, Allegaert K
Pediatr Res 2022 Sep;92(3):848-852. Epub 2021 Dec 2 doi: 10.1038/s41390-021-01877-w. PMID: 34857877
Anah MU, Nlemadim AC, Uzomba CI, Ineji EO, Odey FA
Hemoglobin 2021 May;45(3):191-196. Epub 2021 Jun 10 doi: 10.1080/03630269.2021.1937207. PMID: 34107826
Zhang N, Gong M, Tse G, Zhang Z, Meng L, Yan BP, Zhang L, Wu G, Xia Y, Xin-Yan G, Li G, Liu T
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2018 Mar;41(3):321-327. Epub 2018 Feb 16 doi: 10.1111/pace.13292. PMID: 29380395
Vandael E, Vandenberk B, Vandenberghe J, Willems R, Foulon V
Int J Clin Pharm 2017 Feb;39(1):16-25. Epub 2016 Dec 23 doi: 10.1007/s11096-016-0414-2. PMID: 28012118

Diagnosis

Bains S, Neves R, Bos JM, Giudicessi JR, MacIntyre C, Ackerman MJ
J Am Coll Cardiol 2023 Feb 7;81(5):477-486. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2022.11.036. PMID: 36725176
Salaets T, Raaijmakers A, Zhang ZY, Yu YL, Wei DM, Staessen JA, Allegaert K
Pediatr Res 2022 Sep;92(3):848-852. Epub 2021 Dec 2 doi: 10.1038/s41390-021-01877-w. PMID: 34857877
Zhang N, Gong M, Tse G, Zhang Z, Meng L, Yan BP, Zhang L, Wu G, Xia Y, Xin-Yan G, Li G, Liu T
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2018 Mar;41(3):321-327. Epub 2018 Feb 16 doi: 10.1111/pace.13292. PMID: 29380395
Vandael E, Vandenberk B, Vandenberghe J, Willems R, Foulon V
Int J Clin Pharm 2017 Feb;39(1):16-25. Epub 2016 Dec 23 doi: 10.1007/s11096-016-0414-2. PMID: 28012118
Clarke SL, Bowron A, Gonzalez IL, Groves SJ, Newbury-Ecob R, Clayton N, Martin RP, Tsai-Goodman B, Garratt V, Ashworth M, Bowen VM, McCurdy KR, Damin MK, Spencer CT, Toth MJ, Kelley RI, Steward CG
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2013 Feb 12;8:23. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-8-23. PMID: 23398819Free PMC Article

Therapy

Salaets T, Raaijmakers A, Zhang ZY, Yu YL, Wei DM, Staessen JA, Allegaert K
Pediatr Res 2022 Sep;92(3):848-852. Epub 2021 Dec 2 doi: 10.1038/s41390-021-01877-w. PMID: 34857877
Yoon KT, Liu H, Lee SS
Clin Mol Hepatol 2021 Jul;27(3):425-436. Epub 2020 Dec 3 doi: 10.3350/cmh.2020.0234. PMID: 33317244Free PMC Article
Kim KS, Kwon HM, Jung KW, Sang BH, Moon YJ, Kim B, Jun IG, Song JG, Hwang GS
J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 Mar;36(3):758-766. Epub 2020 Jul 30 doi: 10.1111/jgh.15179. PMID: 32804412
Vandael E, Vandenberk B, Vandenberghe J, Willems R, Foulon V
Int J Clin Pharm 2017 Feb;39(1):16-25. Epub 2016 Dec 23 doi: 10.1007/s11096-016-0414-2. PMID: 28012118
Glassman AH, Bigger JT Jr
Am J Psychiatry 2001 Nov;158(11):1774-82. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.158.11.1774. PMID: 11691681

Prognosis

Lee W, Vandenberk B, Raj SR, Lee SS
Gut Liver 2022 Nov 15;16(6):849-860. Epub 2022 Jul 22 doi: 10.5009/gnl210537. PMID: 35864808Free PMC Article
Salaets T, Raaijmakers A, Zhang ZY, Yu YL, Wei DM, Staessen JA, Allegaert K
Pediatr Res 2022 Sep;92(3):848-852. Epub 2021 Dec 2 doi: 10.1038/s41390-021-01877-w. PMID: 34857877
Yılmaz AS, Çinier G, Çırakoğlu ÖF, Çetin M
Clin Exp Hypertens 2021 Apr 3;43(3):230-236. Epub 2020 Nov 12 doi: 10.1080/10641963.2020.1847131. PMID: 33183070
Zhang N, Gong M, Tse G, Zhang Z, Meng L, Yan BP, Zhang L, Wu G, Xia Y, Xin-Yan G, Li G, Liu T
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2018 Mar;41(3):321-327. Epub 2018 Feb 16 doi: 10.1111/pace.13292. PMID: 29380395
Glassman AH, Bigger JT Jr
Am J Psychiatry 2001 Nov;158(11):1774-82. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.158.11.1774. PMID: 11691681

Clinical prediction guides

Salaets T, Raaijmakers A, Zhang ZY, Yu YL, Wei DM, Staessen JA, Allegaert K
Pediatr Res 2022 Sep;92(3):848-852. Epub 2021 Dec 2 doi: 10.1038/s41390-021-01877-w. PMID: 34857877
Yılmaz AS, Çinier G, Çırakoğlu ÖF, Çetin M
Clin Exp Hypertens 2021 Apr 3;43(3):230-236. Epub 2020 Nov 12 doi: 10.1080/10641963.2020.1847131. PMID: 33183070
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