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Hartsfield-Bixler-Demyer syndrome(HRTFDS)

MedGen UID:
335111
Concept ID:
C1845146
Congenital Abnormality
Synonyms: Hartsfield syndrome; Holoprosencephaly, ectrodactyly, and bilateral cleft lip/palate; HRTFDS
SNOMED CT: Hartsfield syndrome (766032007); Hartsfield Bixler Demyer syndrome (766032007); Holoprosencephaly, ectrodactyly, cleft lip, cleft palate syndrome (766032007)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
 
Gene (location): FGFR1 (8p11.23)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0014196
OMIM®: 615465
Orphanet: ORPHA2117

Definition

FGFR1-related Hartsfield syndrome comprises two core features: holoprosencephaly (HPE) spectrum disorder and ectrodactyly spectrum disorder. HPE spectrum disorder, resulting from failed or incomplete forebrain division early in gestation, includes alobar, semilobar, or lobar HPE. Other observed midline brain malformations include corpus callosum agenesis, absent septum pellucidum, absent olfactory bulbs and tracts, and vermian hypoplasia. Other findings associated with the HPE spectrum such as craniofacial dysmorphism, neurologic issues (developmental delay, spasticity, seizures, hypothalamic dysfunction), feeding problems, and endocrine issues (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and central insipidus diabetes) are common. Ectrodactyly spectrum disorders are unilateral or bilateral malformations of the hands and/or feet characterized by a median cleft of hand or foot due to absence of the longitudinal central rays (also called split-hand/foot malformation). The number of digits on the right and left can vary. Polydactyly and syndactyly can also be seen. [from GeneReviews]

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Hartsfield syndrome (HRTFDS) classically refers to the triad of holoprosencephaly, ectrodactyly, and cleft/lip palate. Profound mental retardation is also present. Multiple other congenital anomalies usually occur (Vilain et al., 2009). The disorder involves midline and limb field defects (Zechi-Ceide et al., 2009). See also ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate syndrome (EEC; 129900), which shows phenotypic similarities.  http://www.omim.org/entry/615465
From MedlinePlus Genetics
Hartsfield syndrome is a rare condition characterized by holoprosencephaly, which is an abnormality of brain development, and a malformation of the hands and feet called ectrodactyly.

During early development before birth, the brain normally divides into two halves, the right and left hemispheres. Holoprosencephaly occurs when the brain fails to divide properly. In the most severe forms of holoprosencephaly, the brain does not divide at all. These affected individuals have one central eye (cyclopia) and a tubular nasal structure (proboscis) located above the eye. Most babies with severe holoprosencephaly die before birth or soon after. In less severe cases of holoprosencephaly, the brain is partially divided. The life expectancy of these affected individuals depends on the severity of signs and symptoms.

People with Hartsfield syndrome often have other brain abnormalities associated with holoprosencephaly. Affected individuals may have a malfunctioning pituitary, which is a gland located at the base of the brain that produces several hormones. Because pituitary dysfunction leads to the partial or complete absence of these hormones, it can cause a variety of disorders. These include diabetes insipidus, which disrupts the balance between fluid intake and urine excretion; a shortage (deficiency) of growth hormone, leading to slow or delayed growth; and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which affects the production of hormones that direct sexual development. Dysfunction in other parts of the brain can cause seizures, feeding difficulties, and problems regulating body temperature and sleep patterns. People with Hartsfield syndrome have delayed development that ranges from mild to severe.

The other hallmark feature of Hartsfield syndrome is ectrodactyly. Ectrodactyly is a deep split in the hands, feet, or both, with missing fingers or toes and partial fusion of the remaining digits. It can affect the hands and feet on one or both sides. Other features that have been described in people with Hartsfield syndrome include premature fusion of certain bones of the skull (craniosynostosis), heart defects, abnormalities of the bones of the spine (vertebrae), and abnormal genitalia. Some affected individuals have distinctive facial features, including eyes that are widely spaced (hypertelorism) or closely spaced (hypotelorism), ears that are abnormally small or unusually shaped, and a split in the lip (cleft lip) with or without an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate).  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/hartsfield-syndrome

Clinical features

From HPO
Cryptorchidism
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
Hypospadias
MedGen UID:
163083
Concept ID:
C0848558
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormal position of urethral meatus on the ventral penile shaft (underside) characterized by displacement of the urethral meatus from the tip of the glans penis to the ventral surface of the penis, scrotum, or perineum.
Micropenis
MedGen UID:
1633603
Concept ID:
C4551492
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small penis. At birth, the normal penis is about 3 cm (stretched length from pubic tubercle to tip of penis) with micropenis less than 2.0-2.5 cm.
Syndactyly
MedGen UID:
52619
Concept ID:
C0039075
Congenital Abnormality
Webbing or fusion of the fingers or toes, involving soft parts only or including bone structure. Bony fusions are referred to as "bony" syndactyly if the fusion occurs in a radio-ulnar axis. Fusions of bones of the fingers or toes in a proximo-distal axis are referred to as "symphalangism".
Ectrodactyly
MedGen UID:
78566
Concept ID:
C0265554
Congenital Abnormality
A condition in which middle parts of the hands and/or feet (digits and meta-carpals and -tarsals) are missing giving a cleft appearance. The severity is very variable ranging from slightly hypoplastic 3rd toe/fingers over absent 2nd or 3rd toes/fingers as far as oligo- or monodactyl hands and/or feet.
Growth delay
MedGen UID:
99124
Concept ID:
C0456070
Pathologic Function
A deficiency or slowing down of growth pre- and postnatally.
Low-set ears
MedGen UID:
65980
Concept ID:
C0239234
Congenital Abnormality
Upper insertion of the ear to the scalp below an imaginary horizontal line drawn between the inner canthi of the eye and extending posteriorly to the ear.
Posteriorly rotated ears
MedGen UID:
96566
Concept ID:
C0431478
Congenital Abnormality
A type of abnormal location of the ears in which the position of the ears is characterized by posterior rotation (the superior part of the ears is rotated towards the back of the head, and the inferior part of the ears towards the front).
Corpus callosum, agenesis of
MedGen UID:
104498
Concept ID:
C0175754
Congenital Abnormality
The corpus callosum is the largest fiber tract in the central nervous system and the major interhemispheric fiber bundle in the brain. Formation of the corpus callosum begins as early as 6 weeks' gestation, with the first fibers crossing the midline at 11 to 12 weeks' gestation, and completion of the basic shape by age 18 to 20 weeks (Schell-Apacik et al., 2008). Agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC) is one of the most frequent malformations in brain with a reported incidence ranging between 0.5 and 70 in 10,000 births. ACC is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition, which can be observed either as an isolated condition or as a manifestation in the context of a congenital syndrome (see MOLECULAR GENETICS and Dobyns, 1996). Also see mirror movements-1 and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum (MRMV1; 157600). Schell-Apacik et al. (2008) noted that there is confusion in the literature regarding radiologic terminology concerning partial absence of the corpus callosum, where various designations have been used, including hypogenesis, hypoplasia, partial agenesis, or dysgenesis.
Lobar holoprosencephaly
MedGen UID:
96559
Concept ID:
C0431362
Congenital Abnormality
A type of holoprosencephaly in which most of the right and left cerebral hemispheres and lateral ventricles are separated but the most rostral aspect of the telencephalon, the frontal lobes, are fused, especially ventrally.
Alobar holoprosencephaly
MedGen UID:
140909
Concept ID:
C0431363
Congenital Abnormality
A type of holoprosencephaly characterized by the presence of a single ventricle and no separation of the cerebral hemisphere. The single midline ventricle is often greatly enlarged.
Bilateral tonic-clonic seizure
MedGen UID:
141670
Concept ID:
C0494475
Sign or Symptom
A bilateral tonic-clonic seizure is a seizure defined by a tonic (bilateral increased tone, lasting seconds to minutes) and then a clonic (bilateral sustained rhythmic jerking) phase.
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Semilobar holoprosencephaly
MedGen UID:
199694
Concept ID:
C0751617
Congenital Abnormality
A type of holoprosencephaly in which the left and right frontal and parietal lobes are fused and the interhemispheric fissure is only present posteriorly.
Gonadotropin deficiency
MedGen UID:
1632671
Concept ID:
C4552011
Disease or Syndrome
A reduced ability to secrete gonadotropins, which are protein hormones secreted by gonadotrope cells of the anterior pituitary gland, including the hormones follitropin (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).
Craniosynostosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
1163
Concept ID:
C0010278
Disease or Syndrome
Craniosynostosis refers to the premature closure of the cranial sutures. Primary craniosynostosis refers to the closure of one or more sutures due to abnormalities in skull development, and secondary craniosynostosis results from failure of brain growth.
Hypoplasia of the frontal bone
MedGen UID:
375593
Concept ID:
C1845147
Finding
Underdevelopment of the frontal bone.
Neonatal hypotonia
MedGen UID:
412209
Concept ID:
C2267233
Disease or Syndrome
Muscular hypotonia (abnormally low muscle tone) manifesting in the neonatal period.
Microcephaly
MedGen UID:
1644158
Concept ID:
C4551563
Finding
Head circumference below 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender.
Hypernatremia
MedGen UID:
6966
Concept ID:
C0020488
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormally increased sodium concentration in the blood.
Cleft upper lip
MedGen UID:
40327
Concept ID:
C0008924
Congenital Abnormality
A gap or groove in the upper lip. This is a congenital defect resulting from nonfusion of tissues of the lip during embryonal development.
Wide nose
MedGen UID:
140869
Concept ID:
C0426421
Finding
Interalar distance more than two standard deviations above the mean for age, i.e., an apparently increased width of the nasal base and alae.
Epicanthus
MedGen UID:
151862
Concept ID:
C0678230
Congenital Abnormality
Epicanthus is a condition in which a fold of skin stretches from the upper to the lower eyelid, partially covering the inner canthus. Usher (1935) noted that epicanthus is a normal finding in the fetus of all races. Epicanthus also occurs in association with hereditary ptosis (110100).
Cleft palate
MedGen UID:
756015
Concept ID:
C2981150
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Diabetes insipidus
MedGen UID:
8349
Concept ID:
C0011848
Disease or Syndrome
A state of excessive water intake and hypotonic (dilute) polyuria. Diabetes insipidus may be due to failure of vasopressin (AVP) release (central or neurogenic diabetes insipidus) or to a failure of the kidney to respond to AVP (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus).
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (see 300000), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Hypotelorism
MedGen UID:
96107
Concept ID:
C0424711
Finding
Interpupillary distance less than 2 SD below the mean (alternatively, the appearance of an decreased interpupillary distance or closely spaced eyes).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

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