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Metaphyseal widening

MedGen UID:
341364
Concept ID:
C1849039
Finding
Synonyms: Wide metaphyses; Widened metaphyses; Widening of metaphyses
 
HPO: HP:0003016

Definition

Abnormal widening of the metaphyseal regions of long bones. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Progressive myositis ossificans
MedGen UID:
4698
Concept ID:
C0016037
Disease or Syndrome
Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is characterized by congenital bilateral hallux valgus malformations and early-onset heterotopic ossification, which may be spontaneous or precipitated by trauma including intramuscular vaccinations. Painful, recurrent soft-tissue swellings (flare-ups) may precede localized heterotopic ossification. Heterotopic ossification can occur at any location, but typically affects regions in close proximity to the axial skeleton in the early/mild stages, before progressing to the appendicular skeleton. This can lead to restriction of movement as a result of ossification impacting joint mobility. Problems with swallowing and speaking can occur with ossification affecting the jaw, head, and neck, and restriction of the airway and breathing may lead to thoracic insufficiency syndrome.
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Disease or Syndrome
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
Menkes kinky-hair syndrome
MedGen UID:
44030
Concept ID:
C0022716
Disease or Syndrome
Menkes disease (MNK) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by generalized copper deficiency. The clinical features result from the dysfunction of several copper-dependent enzymes.
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 6
MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS6) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004).
Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
19860
Concept ID:
C0036069
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-A
MedGen UID:
43375
Concept ID:
C0086651
Disease or Syndrome
The phenotypic spectrum of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is a continuum that ranges from a severe and rapidly progressive early-onset form to a slowly progressive later-onset form. Children with MPS IVA typically have no distinctive clinical findings at birth. The severe form is usually apparent between ages one and three years, often first manifesting as kyphoscoliosis, genu valgum (knock-knee), and pectus carinatum; the slowly progressive form may not become evident until late childhood or adolescence, often first manifesting as hip problems (pain, stiffness, and Legg Perthes disease). Progressive bone and joint involvement leads to short stature, and eventually to disabling pain and arthritis. Involvement of other organ systems can lead to significant morbidity, including respiratory compromise, obstructive sleep apnea, valvular heart disease, hearing impairment, visual impairment from corneal clouding, dental abnormalities, and hepatomegaly. Compression of the spinal cord is a common complication that results in neurologic impairment. Children with MPS IVA have normal intellectual abilities at the outset of the disease.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-B
MedGen UID:
43376
Concept ID:
C0086652
Disease or Syndrome
GLB1-related disorders comprise two phenotypically distinct lysosomal storage disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB (MPS IVB). The phenotype of GM1 gangliosidosis constitutes a spectrum ranging from severe (infantile) to intermediate (late-infantile and juvenile) to mild (chronic/adult). Type I (infantile) GM1 gangliosidosis begins before age 12 months. Prenatal manifestations may include nonimmune hydrops fetalis, intrauterine growth restriction, and placental vacuolization; congenital dermal melanocytosis (Mongolian spots) may be observed. Macular cherry-red spot is detected on eye exam. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction leads to spasticity and rapid regression; blindness, deafness, decerebrate rigidity, seizures, feeding difficulties, and oral secretions are observed. Life expectancy is two to three years. Type II can be subdivided into the late-infantile (onset age 1-3 years) and juvenile (onset age 3-10 years) phenotypes. Central nervous system dysfunction manifests as progressive cognitive, motor, and speech decline as measured by psychometric testing. There may be mild corneal clouding, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or cardiomyopathy; the typical course is characterized by progressive neurologic decline, progressive skeletal disease in some individuals (including kyphosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads), and progressive feeding difficulties leading to aspiration risk. Type III begins in late childhood to the third decade with generalized dystonia leading to unsteady gait and speech disturbance followed by extrapyramidal signs including akinetic-rigid parkinsonism. Cardiomyopathy develops in some and skeletal involvement occurs in most. Intellectual impairment is common late in the disease with prognosis directly related to the degree of neurologic impairment. MPS IVB is characterized by skeletal dysplasia with specific findings of axial and appendicular dysostosis multiplex, short stature (below 15th centile in adults), kyphoscoliosis, coxa/genu valga, joint laxity, platyspondyly, and odontoid hypoplasia. First signs and symptoms may be apparent at birth. Bony involvement is progressive, with more than 84% of adults requiring ambulation aids; life span does not appear to be limited. Corneal clouding is detected in some individuals and cardiac valvular disease may develop.
Hurler syndrome
MedGen UID:
39698
Concept ID:
C0086795
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a progressive multisystem disorder with features ranging over a continuum of severity. While affected individuals have traditionally been classified as having one of three MPS I syndromes (Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome, or Scheie syndrome), no easily measurable biochemical differences have been identified and the clinical findings overlap. Affected individuals are best described as having either a phenotype consistent with either severe (Hurler syndrome) or attenuated MPS I, a distinction that influences therapeutic options. Severe MPS I. Infants appear normal at birth. Typical early manifestations are nonspecific (e.g., umbilical or inguinal hernia, frequent upper respiratory tract infections before age 1 year). Coarsening of the facial features may not become apparent until after age one year. Gibbus deformity of the lower spine is common and often noted within the first year. Progressive skeletal dysplasia (dysostosis multiplex) involving all bones is universal, as is progressive arthropathy involving most joints. By age three years, linear growth decreases. Intellectual disability is progressive and profound but may not be readily apparent in the first year of life. Progressive cardiorespiratory involvement, hearing loss, and corneal clouding are common. Without treatment, death (typically from cardiorespiratory failure) usually occurs within the first ten years of life. Attenuated MPS I. Clinical onset is usually between ages three and ten years. The severity and rate of disease progression range from serious life-threatening complications leading to death in the second to third decade, to a normal life span complicated by significant disability from progressive joint manifestations and cardiorespiratory disease. While some individuals have no neurologic involvement and psychomotor development may be normal in early childhood, learning disabilities and psychiatric manifestations can be present later in life. Hearing loss, cardiac valvular disease, respiratory involvement, and corneal clouding are common.
Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, McKusick type
MedGen UID:
67398
Concept ID:
C0220748
Congenital Abnormality
The cartilage-hair hypoplasia – anauxetic dysplasia (CHH-AD) spectrum disorders are a continuum that includes the following phenotypes: Metaphyseal dysplasia without hypotrichosis (MDWH). Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH). Anauxetic dysplasia (AD). CHH-AD spectrum disorders are characterized by severe disproportionate (short-limb) short stature that is usually recognized in the newborn, and occasionally prenatally because of the short extremities. Other findings include joint hypermobility, fine silky hair, immunodeficiency, anemia, increased risk for malignancy, gastrointestinal dysfunction, and impaired spermatogenesis. The most severe phenotype, AD, has the most pronounced skeletal phenotype, may be associated with atlantoaxial subluxation in the newborn, and may include cognitive deficiency. The clinical manifestations of the CHH-AD spectrum disorders are variable, even within the same family.
Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome
MedGen UID:
120527
Concept ID:
C0265286
Disease or Syndrome
Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen disease (DMC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and impaired intellectual development. Short-trunk dwarfism and microcephaly are present, and specific radiologic appearances most likely reflect abnormalities of the growth plates, including platyspondyly with notched end plates, metaphyseal irregularities, laterally displaced capital femoral epiphyses, and small iliac wings with lacy iliac crests (summary by El Ghouzzi et al., 2003).
Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, Schmid type
MedGen UID:
78550
Concept ID:
C0265289
Disease or Syndrome
Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (SMCD) is characterized by progressive short stature that develops by age two years. The clinical and radiographic features are usually not present at birth, but manifest in early childhood with short limbs, genu varum, and waddling gait. Facial features and head size are normal. Radiographs show metaphyseal irregularities of the long bones (e.g., splaying, flaring, cupping); shortening of the tubular bones; widened growth plates; coxa vara; and anterior cupping, sclerosis, and splaying of the ribs. Mild hand involvement often includes shortening of the tubular bones and metaphyseal cupping of the metacarpals and proximal phalanges. Platyspondyly and vertebral end-plate irregularities are less common. Hand and vertebral involvement can resolve with age. Early motor milestones may be delayed due to orthopedic complications. Intelligence is normal. Joint pain in the knees and hips is common and may limit physical activity. Adult height is typically more than 3.5 SD below the mean, although a wide spectrum that overlaps normal height has been reported. There are no extraskeletal manifestations.
Pyle metaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
82704
Concept ID:
C0265294
Disease or Syndrome
Pyle disease is characterized by long bones with wide and expanded trabecular metaphyses, thin cortical bone, and bone fragility. Fractures are common in Pyle disease, and fracture lines usually go through the abnormally wide metaphyses, revealing their fragility (summary by Kiper et al., 2016).
Pseudoachondroplastic spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
98378
Concept ID:
C0410538
Congenital Abnormality
Pseudoachondroplasia is characterized by normal length at birth and normal facies. Often the presenting feature is a waddling gait, recognized at the onset of walking. Typically, the growth rate falls below the standard growth curve by approximately age two years, leading to a moderately severe form of disproportionate short-limb short stature. Joint pain during childhood, particularly in the large joints of the lower extremities, is common. Degenerative joint disease is progressive; approximately 50% of individuals with pseudoachondroplasia eventually require hip replacement surgery.
Rolland-Debuqois syndrome
MedGen UID:
98145
Concept ID:
C0432209
Disease or Syndrome
The dyssegmental dysplasias are lethal forms of neonatal short-limbed dwarfism. Handmaker et al. (1977) coined the term 'dyssegmental dysplasia' because of the marked differences in size and shape of the vertebral bodies (anisospondyly), which he attributed to errors in segmentation. Fasanelli et al. (1985) proposed that there are different forms of dyssegmental dwarfism, a lethal Silverman-Handmaker type (224410) and a less severe Rolland-Desbuquois type. The Rolland-Desbuquois form is lethal in about 40% of patients. Although many patients survive beyond the newborn period, all exhibit neonatal distress (summary by Hennekam et al., 2010).
Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia
MedGen UID:
96581
Concept ID:
C0432215
Congenital Abnormality
Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by predominant involvement of articular cartilage with progressive joint stiffness and enlargement in the absence of inflammation. Onset – typically between ages three and six years – begins with the involvement of the interphalangeal joints. Over time, involvement of large joints and the spine causes significant joint contractures, gait disturbance, and scoliosis and/or kyphosis, resulting in abnormal posture and significant morbidity. Despite the considerable arthropathy, pain is not a major presenting feature of this condition. Initially height is normal; however, short stature (<3rd centile) becomes evident in adolescence as the skeletal changes progress.
Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, Spahr type
MedGen UID:
140928
Concept ID:
C0432225
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, primary bone dysplasia disease characterized by usually moderate, postnatal short stature, progressive genu vara deformity, a waddling gait, and radiological signs of metaphyseal dysplasia (i.e. irregular, sclerotic and widened metaphyses), in the absence of biochemical abnormalities suggestive of rickets disease. Intermittent knee pain, lordosis, and delayed motor development may also occasionally be associated.
Osteoporosis with pseudoglioma
MedGen UID:
98480
Concept ID:
C0432252
Disease or Syndrome
Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome is a rare condition characterized by severe thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) and eye abnormalities that lead to vision loss. In people with this condition, osteoporosis is usually recognized in early childhood. It is caused by a shortage of minerals, such as calcium, in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone to fracture. Affected individuals often have multiple bone fractures, including in the bones that form the spine (vertebrae). Multiple fractures can cause collapse of the affected vertebrae (compressed vertebrae), abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis), short stature, and limb deformities. Decreased bone mineral density can also cause softening or thinning of the skull (craniotabes).\n\nMost affected individuals have impaired vision at birth or by early infancy and are blind by young adulthood. Vision problems are usually caused by one of several eye conditions, grouped together as pseudoglioma, that affect the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), although other eye conditions have been identified in affected individuals. Pseudogliomas are so named because, on examination, the conditions resemble an eye tumor known as a retinal glioma.\n\nRarely, people with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome have additional signs or symptoms such as mild intellectual disability, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), abnormally flexible joints, or seizures.
Hypertrichotic osteochondrodysplasia Cantu type
MedGen UID:
208647
Concept ID:
C0795905
Disease or Syndrome
Cantú syndrome is characterized by congenital hypertrichosis; distinctive coarse facial features (including broad nasal bridge, wide mouth with full lips and macroglossia); enlarged heart with enhanced systolic function or pericardial effusion and in many, a large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) requiring repair; and skeletal abnormalities (thickening of the calvaria, broad ribs, scoliosis, and flaring of the metaphyses). Other cardiovascular abnormalities may include dilated aortic root and ascending aorta with rare aortic aneurysm, tortuous vascularity involving brain and retinal vasculature, and pulmonary arteriovenous communications. Generalized edema (which may be present at birth) spontaneously resolves; peripheral edema of the lower extremities (and sometimes arms and hands) may develop at adolescence. Developmental delays are common, but intellect is typically normal; behavioral problems can include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, and depression.
Sponastrime dysplasia
MedGen UID:
266247
Concept ID:
C1300260
Disease or Syndrome
Sponastrime dysplasia is an autosomal recessive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD) named for characteristic clinical and radiographic findings, including spine (spondylar) abnormalities, midface hypoplasia with a depressed nasal bridge, and striation of the metaphyses. Additional features include disproportionate short stature with exaggerated lumbar lordosis, scoliosis, coxa vara, limited elbow extension, small dysplastic epiphyses, childhood cataracts, short dental roots, and hypogammaglobulinemia. Radiographically, the abnormalities of the lumbar vertebral bodies are suggested to be the most specific finding because the characteristic metaphyseal striations may not be apparent at young ages. Striking clinical variability in presentation, severity, and associated features has been observed (summary by Burrage et al., 2019).
Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome
MedGen UID:
231160
Concept ID:
C1321551
Disease or Syndrome
Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS) is characterized by: delayed motor and cognitive milestones and mild-to-moderate intellectual disability; craniosynostosis of the coronal, sagittal, or lambdoid sutures; distinctive craniofacial features; and musculoskeletal findings including olichostenomelia, arachnodactyly, camptodactyly, pectus excavatum or carinatum, scoliosis, joint hypermobility or contractures, pes planus, foot malposition, and C1-C2 spine malformation. Cardiovascular anomalies may include mitral valve prolapse, secundum atrial septal defect, and aortic root dilatation. Minimal subcutaneous fat, abdominal wall defects, and myopia are also characteristic findings.
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, A4 type
MedGen UID:
324620
Concept ID:
C1836862
Disease or Syndrome
The spondylometaphyseal dysplasias are a relatively common, heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by spinal and metaphyseal changes of variable pattern and severity. The classification of spondylometaphyseal dysplasias of Maroteaux and Spranger (1991) was based on changes of the femoral neck and the shape of vertebral anomalies. In this classification, type A4 referred to a form with severe metaphyseal changes of the femoral neck and ovoid, flattened vertebral bodies with anterior tongue-like deformities.
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia-cone-rod dystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
324684
Concept ID:
C1837073
Disease or Syndrome
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with cone-rod dystrophy (SMDCRD) is characterized by postnatal growth deficiency resulting in profound short stature, rhizomelia with bowing of the lower extremities, platyspondyly with anterior vertebral protrusions, progressive metaphyseal irregularity and cupping with shortened tubular bones, and early-onset progressive visual impairment associated with a pigmentary maculopathy and electroretinographic evidence of cone-rod dysfunction (summary by Hoover-Fong et al., 2014). Yamamoto et al. (2014) reviewed 16 reported cases of SMDCRD, noting that all affected individuals presented uniform skeletal findings, with rhizomelia and bowed lower limbs observed in the first year of life, whereas retinal dystrophy had a more variable age of onset. There was severe disproportionate short stature, with a final height of less than 100 cm; scoliosis was usually mild. Visual loss was progressive, with stabilization in adolescence.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, matrilin-3 type
MedGen UID:
325181
Concept ID:
C1837481
Disease or Syndrome
The Borochowitz-Cormier-Daire type of spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMDBCD) is a rare type of autosomal recessive short-limb short-trunk dwarfism. Affected individuals have significant short stature with pronounced leg bowing, lumbar lordosis, and a waddling gait (summary by Borochowitz et al., 2004 and Shyamasundar et al., 2020).
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation
MedGen UID:
375009
Concept ID:
C1842763
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation (SPENCDI) is an immunoosseous dysplasia combining the typical metaphyseal and vertebral bone lesions of spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD) with immune dysfunction and neurologic involvement. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by radiolucent and irregular spondylar and metaphyseal lesions that represent islands of chondroid tissue within bone. The vertebral bodies show dorsally accentuated platyspondyly with disturbance of ossification. Clinical abnormalities such as short stature, rhizomelic micromelia, increased lumbar lordosis, barrel chest, facial anomalies, and clumsy movements may be present (Menger et al., 1989). Central nervous system involvement includes spasticity, mental retardation, and cerebral calcifications, and immune dysregulation ranges from autoimmunity to immunodeficiency. Neurologic and autoimmune manifestations have been observed in different combinations within a single family, suggesting that this disorder may be defined by specific radiographic features but has remarkably pleiotropic manifestations (Renella et al., 2006). Briggs et al. (2016) also noted variability in skeletal, neurologic, and immune phenotypes, which was sometimes marked between members of the same family. Classification of the Enchondromatoses In their classification of the enchondromatoses, Spranger et al. (1978) called Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome types I and II enchondromatosis, respectively; metachondromatosis (156250), type III; and spondyloenchondrodysplasia (SPENCD), also called spondyloenchondromatosis, type IV; enchondromatosis with irregular vertebral lesions, type V; and generalized enchondromatosis, type VI. Halal and Azouz (1991) added 3 tentative categories to the 6 in the classification of Spranger et al. (1978). Pansuriya et al. (2010) suggested a new classification of enchondromatosis (multiple enchondromas).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Bieganski type
MedGen UID:
335350
Concept ID:
C1846148
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy (SEMDHL) is an X-linked recessive developmental disorder characterized by slowly progressive skeletal and neurologic abnormalities, including short stature, large and deformed joints, significant motor impairment, visual defects, and sometimes cognitive deficits. Affected individuals typically have normal early development in the first year or so of life, followed by development regression and the development of symptoms. Brain imaging shows white matter abnormalities consistent with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy (summary by Miyake et al., 2017).
Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura syndrome
MedGen UID:
376653
Concept ID:
C1849762
Disease or Syndrome
Gillessen-Kaesbach-Nishimura syndrome is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly disorder characterized by skeletal dysplasia, dysmorphic facial features, and variable visceral abnormalities, including polycystic kidneys, diaphragmatic hernia, lung hypoplasia, and congenital heart defects. It may be lethal in utero or early in life. The disorder is at the severe end of the phenotypic spectrum of congenital disorders of glycosylation (summary by Tham et al., 2016).
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis arthropathy spectrum
MedGen UID:
342428
Concept ID:
C1850155
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis and arthropathy (MONA) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by progressive osteolysis (particularly of the carpal and tarsal bones), osteoporosis, subcutaneous nodules on the palms and soles, and progressive arthropathy (joint contractures, pain, swelling, and stiffness). Other manifestations include coarse facies, pigmented skin lesions, cardiac defects, and corneal opacities. Onset is usually between ages six months and six years (range: birth to 11 years).
Craniometaphyseal dysplasia, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
338945
Concept ID:
C1852502
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant craniometaphyseal dysplasia (designated AD-CMD in this review) is characterized by progressive diffuse hyperostosis of cranial bones evident clinically as wide nasal bridge, paranasal bossing, widely spaced eyes with an increase in bizygomatic width, and prominent mandible. Development of dentition may be delayed and teeth may fail to erupt as a result of hyperostosis and sclerosis of alveolar bone. Progressive thickening of craniofacial bones continues throughout life, often resulting in narrowing of the cranial foramina, including the foramen magnum. If untreated, compression of cranial nerves can lead to disabling conditions such as facial palsy, blindness, or deafness (conductive and/or sensorineural hearing loss). In individuals with typical uncomplicated AD-CMD life expectancy is normal; in those with severe AD-CMD life expectancy can be reduced as a result of compression of the foramen magnum.
Metaphyseal dysostosis-intellectual disability-conductive deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
344437
Concept ID:
C1855175
Disease or Syndrome
Metaphyseal dysostosis-intellectual disability-conductive deafness syndrome is characterised by metaphyseal dysplasia, short-limb dwarfism, mild intellectual deficit and conductive hearing loss, associated with repeated episodes of otitis media in childhood. It has been described in three brothers born to consanguineous Sicilian parents. Variable manifestations included hyperopia and strabismus. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive.
Thoracolaryngopelvic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
349978
Concept ID:
C1861197
Disease or Syndrome
A short-rib dysplasia with characteristics of thoracic dystrophy, laryngeal stenosis and a small pelvis. Less than 10 cases have been reported in the literature so far. Patients present with severe respiratory distress (requiring intubation) during the neonatal period. The rib shortening is less severe than in Jeune syndrome and the thorax is characteristically small, narrow and bell-shaped. The pelvis is reduced in all dimensions and the combination of the thorax anomalies and the small pelvis give the appearance of a protruding abdomen. Subglottic stenosis has also been described but it remains unclear whether this is a congenital anomaly or is secondary to long-term intubation. Transmission is autosomal dominant.
Brachydactyly-elbow wrist dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
396103
Concept ID:
C1861313
Disease or Syndrome
Liebenberg syndrome is an upper limb malformation characterized by the combination of dysplastic elbow joints and the fusion of wrist bones with consequent radial deviation (summary by Spielmann et al., 2012).
Mucolipidosis type II
MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, aggrecan type
MedGen UID:
411237
Concept ID:
C2748544
Disease or Syndrome
A new form of skeletal dysplasia with manifestations of severe short stature, facial dysmorphism and characteristic radiographic findings. To date, three cases have been described, all originating from the same family. The disease results from a missense mutation affecting the C-type lectin domain of aggrecan (AGC1 gene; chromosome 15) which regulates endochondral ossification. Transmission is autosomal recessive.
Metaphyseal anadysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
414350
Concept ID:
C2751322
Disease or Syndrome
Any metaphyseal anadysplasia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MMP9 gene.
Nephropathic cystinosis
MedGen UID:
419735
Concept ID:
C2931187
Disease or Syndrome
Cystinosis comprises three allelic phenotypes: Nephropathic cystinosis in untreated children is characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome, poor growth, hypophosphatemic/calcipenic rickets, impaired glomerular function resulting in complete glomerular failure, and accumulation of cystine in almost all cells, leading to cellular dysfunction with tissue and organ impairment. The typical untreated child has short stature, rickets, and photophobia. Failure to thrive is generally noticed after approximately age six months; signs of renal tubular Fanconi syndrome (polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and acidosis) appear as early as age six months; corneal crystals can be present before age one year and are always present after age 16 months. Prior to the use of renal transplantation and cystine-depleting therapy, the life span in nephropathic cystinosis was no longer than ten years. With these interventions, affected individuals can survive at least into the mid-forties or fifties with satisfactory quality of life. Intermediate cystinosis is characterized by all the typical manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis, but onset is at a later age. Renal glomerular failure occurs in all untreated affected individuals, usually between ages 15 and 25 years. The non-nephropathic (ocular) form of cystinosis is characterized clinically only by photophobia resulting from corneal cystine crystal accumulation.
Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy 5
MedGen UID:
482228
Concept ID:
C3280598
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Fibrochondrogenesis 2
MedGen UID:
482758
Concept ID:
C3281128
Disease or Syndrome
Fibrochondrogenesis is a severe skeletal dysplasia characterized by a flat midface, short long bones, short ribs with broad metaphyses, and vertebral bodies that show distinctive hypoplastic posterior ends and rounded anterior ends, giving the vertebral bodies a pinched appearance on lateral radiographic views. The chest is small, causing perinatal respiratory problems which usually, but not always, result in lethality. Affected individuals who survive the neonatal period have high myopia, mild to moderate hearing loss, and severe skeletal dysplasia (summary by Tompson et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of fibrochondrogenesis, see FBCG1 (228520).
Desbuquois dysplasia 1
MedGen UID:
860583
Concept ID:
C4012146
Disease or Syndrome
Desbuquois dysplasia (DBQD) is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia belonging to the multiple dislocation group and characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth retardation (stature less than -5 SD), joint laxity, short extremities, and progressive scoliosis. The main radiologic features are short long bones with metaphyseal splay, a 'Swedish key' appearance of the proximal femur (exaggerated trochanter), and advanced carpal and tarsal bone age with a delta phalanx (summary by Huber et al., 2009). Desbuquois dysplasia is clinically and radiographically heterogeneous, and had been classified into 2 types based on the presence (type 1) or absence (type 2) of characteristic hand anomalies, including an extra ossification center distal to the second metacarpal, delta phalanx, bifid distal thumb phalanx, and dislocation of the interphalangeal joints (Faivre et al., 2004). However, patients with and without these additional hand anomalies have been reported to have mutations in the same gene (see, e.g., CANT1); thus, these features are not distinctive criteria to predict the molecular basis of DBQD (Furuichi et al., 2011). In addition, Kim et al. (2010) described another milder variant of DBQD with almost normal outwardly appearing hands, but significant radiographic changes, including short metacarpals, elongated phalanges, and remarkably advanced carpal bone age. However, there is no accessory ossification center distal to the second metacarpal, and patients do not have thumb anomalies. Similar changes occur in the feet. These patients also tend to develop precocious osteoarthritis of the hand and spine with age. This phenotype is sometimes referred to as the 'Kim variant' of DBQD (Furuichi et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Desbuquois Dysplasia DBQD2 (615777) is caused by mutation in the XYLT1 gene (608124) on chromosome 16p12. Two unrelated patients with immunodeficiency-23 (IMD23; 615816), due to mutation in the PGM3 gene (172100), were reported to have skeletal features reminiscent of DBQD.
Desbuquois dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
862731
Concept ID:
C4014294
Disease or Syndrome
Desbuquois dysplasia, which belongs to the multiple dislocation group of disorders, is characterized by dislocations of large joints, severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation, joint laxity, and flat face with prominent eyes. Radiologic features include short long bones with an exaggerated trochanter that gives a 'monkey wrench' appearance to the proximal femur, and advanced carpal and tarsal ossification (summary by Bui et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Desbuquois dysplasia, see DBQD1 (251450).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, type 1, with or without fractures
MedGen UID:
865814
Concept ID:
C4017377
Disease or Syndrome
Any spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the B3GALT6 gene.
Mucopolysaccharidosis-plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
934594
Concept ID:
C4310627
Disease or Syndrome
MPSPS is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting in a multisystem disorder with features of the mucopolysaccharidosis lysosomal storage diseases (see, e.g., 607016). Patients present in infancy or early childhood with respiratory difficulties, cardiac problems, anemia, dysostosis multiplex, renal involvement, coarse facies, and delayed psychomotor development. Most patients die of cardiorespiratory failure in the first years of life (summary by Kondo et al., 2017).
Seckel syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
934614
Concept ID:
C4310647
Disease or Syndrome
Any Seckel syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NSMCE2 gene.
Short stature, rhizomelic, with microcephaly, micrognathia, and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
934653
Concept ID:
C4310686
Disease or Syndrome
The core features of short stature-micrognathia syndrome (SSMG) are intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), postnatal short stature that is often rhizomelic, and micrognathia. Other common features include preterm birth, microcephaly, developmental delay, and genitourinary malformations in males. Transient liver dysfunction and glycosylation abnormalities during illness, giant cell hepatitis, hepatoblastoma, and cataracts have also been observed. Inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic severity varies greatly, from a relatively mild disorder to intrauterine death or stillbirth (Ritter et al., 2022).
Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
1647990
Concept ID:
C4551479
Disease or Syndrome
Schwartz-Jampel syndrome is a rare condition characterized by permanent muscle stiffness (myotonia) and bone abnormalities known as chondrodysplasia. The signs and symptoms of this condition become apparent sometime after birth, usually in early childhood. Either muscle stiffness or chondrodysplasia can appear first. The muscle and bone abnormalities worsen in childhood, although most affected individuals have a normal lifespan. The specific features of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome vary widely.\n\nMyotonia involves continuous tensing (contraction) of muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles) throughout the body. This sustained muscle contraction causes stiffness that interferes with eating, sitting, walking, and other movements. Sustained contraction of muscles in the face leads to a fixed, "mask-like" facial expression with narrow eye openings (blepharophimosis) and pursed lips. This facial appearance is very specific to Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Affected individuals may also be nearsighted and experience abnormal blinking or spasms of the eyelids (blepharospasm).\n\nChondrodysplasia affects the development of the skeleton, particularly the long bones in the arms and legs and the bones of the hips. These bones are shortened and unusually wide at the ends, so affected individuals have short stature. The long bones may also be abnormally curved (bowed). Other bone abnormalities associated with Schwartz-Jampel syndrome include a protruding chest (pectus carinatum), abnormal curvature of the spine, flattened bones of the spine (platyspondyly), and joint abnormalities called contractures that further restrict movement.\n\nResearchers originally described two types of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Type 1 has the signs and symptoms described above, while type 2 has more severe bone abnormalities and other health problems and is usually life-threatening in early infancy. Researchers have since discovered that the condition they thought was Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 2 is actually part of another disorder, Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome, which is caused by mutations in a different gene. They have recommended that the designation Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 2 no longer be used.
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1640046
Concept ID:
C4692625
Disease or Syndrome
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by: exocrine pancreatic dysfunction with malabsorption, malnutrition, and growth failure; hematologic abnormalities with single- or multilineage cytopenias and susceptibility to myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML); and bone abnormalities. In almost all affected children, persistent or intermittent neutropenia is a common presenting finding, often before the diagnosis of SDS is made. Short stature and recurrent infections are common.
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1634617
Concept ID:
C4693704
Disease or Syndrome
Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is characterized by: exocrine pancreatic dysfunction with malabsorption, malnutrition, and growth failure; hematologic abnormalities with single- or multilineage cytopenias and susceptibility to myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML); and bone abnormalities. In almost all affected children, persistent or intermittent neutropenia is a common presenting finding, often before the diagnosis of SDS is made. Short stature and recurrent infections are common.
Brain abnormalities, neurodegeneration, and dysosteosclerosis
MedGen UID:
1678789
Concept ID:
C5193117
Disease or Syndrome
Brain abnormalities, neurodegeneration, and dysosteosclerosis (BANDDOS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brain abnormalities, progressive neurologic deterioration, and sclerotic bone dysplasia similar to dysosteosclerosis (DOS). The age at onset is highly variable: some patients may present in infancy with hydrocephalus, global developmental delay, and hypotonia, whereas others may have onset of symptoms in the late teens or early twenties after normal development. Neurologic features include loss of previous motor and language skills, cognitive impairment, spasticity, and focal seizures. Brain imaging shows periventricular white matter abnormalities and calcifications, large cisterna magna or Dandy-Walker malformation, and sometimes agenesis of the corpus callosum (summary by Guo et al., 2019).
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with corneal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
1714019
Concept ID:
C5394555
Disease or Syndrome
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with corneal dystrophy (SMDCD) is characterized by short stature due to short proximal and distal long bones. Affected individuals also exhibit narrow thorax with pulmonary hypoplasia and respiratory failure, as well as corneal dystrophy. Severe developmental delay has been observed (Ben-Salem et al., 2018).
Goldblatt syndrome
MedGen UID:
1784281
Concept ID:
C5542277
Disease or Syndrome
Odontochondrodysplasia-1 (ODCD1) is characterized by mesomelic shortening of tubular bones, ligamentous laxity, and scoliosis, in association with dentinogenesis imperfecta involving both primary and secondary dentition. Affected individuals show variable severity. Radiologic features include trident pelvis, posteriorly flattened vertebrae, and brachydactyly with cone-shaped epiphyses (Maroteaux et al., 1996). Clinical variability and extraskeletal manifestations have been observed (Wehrle et al., 2019). Genetic Heterogeneity of Odontochondrodysplasia Odontochondrodysplasia-2 with hearing loss and diabetes (ODCD2; 619269) is caused by mutation in the TANGO1 gene (MIA3; 613455) on chromosome 1q41.
Neurodevelopmental disorder with craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal defects
MedGen UID:
1824008
Concept ID:
C5774235
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal defects (NEDCDS) is characterized by global developmental delay, severely impaired intellectual development with poor or absent speech, characteristic facial features, and variable skeletal abnormalities. Additional features include feeding difficulties, inability to walk or walking with an abnormal gait, and cerebellar or other abnormalities on brain imaging (Reichert et al., 2020).

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Al Kaissi A, Ghachem MB, Nabil NM, Kenis V, Melchenko E, Morenko E, Grill F, Ganger R, Kircher SG
Orthop Surg 2018 Aug;10(3):241-246. Epub 2018 Jul 19 doi: 10.1111/os.12382. PMID: 30027601Free PMC Article

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Uludağ Alkaya D, Akpınar E, Bilguvar K, Tüysüz B
Am J Med Genet A 2021 Jul;185(7):2271-2277. Epub 2021 Apr 10 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.62198. PMID: 33837634
Chehade H, Girardin E, Rosato L, Cachat F, Cotting J, Perez MH
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2011 Sep;96(9):2681-3. Epub 2011 Jul 27 doi: 10.1210/jc.2011-1112. PMID: 21795457
Kumru P, Aka N, Köse G, Vural ZT, Peker O, Kayserili H
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Joseph B, Rao N, Mulpuri K, Varghese G, Nair S
J Pediatr Orthop B 2005 Jan;14(1):10-5. doi: 10.1097/01202412-200501000-00002. PMID: 15577301

Diagnosis

Christodoulou L, Pavlidou E, Spyridou C, Eccles S, Calder A, Mankad K, Kinali M
Childs Nerv Syst 2016 Jul;32(7):1333-6. Epub 2016 Feb 4 doi: 10.1007/s00381-016-3021-6. PMID: 26847543Free PMC Article
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Therapy

John RR, Boddu D, Chaudhary N, Yadav VK, Mathew LG
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2015 May;37(4):285-9. doi: 10.1097/MPH.0000000000000279. PMID: 25374284

Prognosis

Joseph B, Rao N, Mulpuri K, Varghese G, Nair S
J Pediatr Orthop B 2005 Jan;14(1):10-5. doi: 10.1097/01202412-200501000-00002. PMID: 15577301
Joseph B, Varghese G, Mulpuri K, Narasimha Rao K, Nair NS
J Pediatr Orthop 2003 Sep-Oct;23(5):590-600. doi: 10.1097/00004694-200309000-00005. PMID: 12960621
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Clinical prediction guides

Uludağ Alkaya D, Akpınar E, Bilguvar K, Tüysüz B
Am J Med Genet A 2021 Jul;185(7):2271-2277. Epub 2021 Apr 10 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.62198. PMID: 33837634
Brambila Tapia AJ, Vásquez Velásque AI, González Mercado MG, Macías Chumacera A, Gutierrez-Amavizca BE, Lara Aguilar RA, Pérez Juárez CR, Moreno Andrade A, Figuera LE
Genet Couns 2012;23(1):51-6. PMID: 22611642
Chehade H, Girardin E, Rosato L, Cachat F, Cotting J, Perez MH
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2011 Sep;96(9):2681-3. Epub 2011 Jul 27 doi: 10.1210/jc.2011-1112. PMID: 21795457
Joseph B, Rao N, Mulpuri K, Varghese G, Nair S
J Pediatr Orthop B 2005 Jan;14(1):10-5. doi: 10.1097/01202412-200501000-00002. PMID: 15577301
Joseph B, Varghese G, Mulpuri K, Narasimha Rao K, Nair NS
J Pediatr Orthop 2003 Sep-Oct;23(5):590-600. doi: 10.1097/00004694-200309000-00005. PMID: 12960621

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