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Short femoral neck

MedGen UID:
373033
Concept ID:
C1836184
Finding
Synonyms: Femoral neck hypoplasia; Femoral neck, short; Hypoplastic femoral neck; Short femoral necks
 
HPO: HP:0100864

Definition

An abnormally short femoral neck (which is the process of bone, connecting the femoral head with the femoral shaft). [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Achondroplasia
MedGen UID:
1289
Concept ID:
C0001080
Congenital Abnormality
Achondroplasia is the most common cause of disproportionate short stature. Affected individuals have rhizomelic shortening of the limbs, macrocephaly, and characteristic facial features with frontal bossing and midface retrusion. In infancy, hypotonia is typical, and acquisition of developmental motor milestones is often both aberrant in pattern and delayed. Intelligence and life span are usually near normal, although craniocervical junction compression increases the risk of death in infancy. Additional complications include obstructive sleep apnea, middle ear dysfunction, kyphosis, and spinal stenosis.
Cleidocranial dysostosis
MedGen UID:
3486
Concept ID:
C0008928
Disease or Syndrome
Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) spectrum disorder is a skeletal dysplasia that represents a clinical continuum ranging from classic CCD (triad of delayed closure of the cranial sutures, hypoplastic or aplastic clavicles, and dental abnormalities) to mild CCD to isolated dental anomalies without the skeletal features. Most individuals come to diagnosis because they have classic features. At birth, affected individuals typically have abnormally large, wide-open fontanelles that may remain open throughout life. Clavicular hypoplasia can result in narrow, sloping shoulders that can be opposed at the midline. Moderate short stature may be observed, with most affected individuals being shorter than their unaffected sibs. Dental anomalies may include supernumerary teeth, eruption failure of the permanent teeth, and presence of the second permanent molar with the primary dentition. Individuals with CCD spectrum disorder are at increased risk of developing recurrent sinus infections, recurrent ear infections leading to conductive hearing loss, and upper-airway obstruction. Intelligence is typically normal.
Hypochondroplasia
MedGen UID:
98376
Concept ID:
C0410529
Congenital Abnormality
Hypochondroplasia is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature; stocky build; disproportionately short arms and legs; broad, short hands and feet; mild joint laxity; and macrocephaly. Radiologic features include shortening of long bones with mild metaphyseal flare; narrowing of the inferior lumbar interpedicular distances; short, broad femoral neck; and squared, shortened ilia. The skeletal features are very similar to those seen in achondroplasia but tend to be milder. Medical complications common to achondroplasia (e.g., spinal stenosis, tibial bowing, obstructive apnea) occur less frequently in hypochondroplasia but intellectual disability and epilepsy may be more prevalent. Children usually present as toddlers or at early school age with decreased growth velocity leading to short stature and limb disproportion. Other features also become more prominent over time.
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia - Sutcliffe type
MedGen UID:
98146
Concept ID:
C0432221
Disease or Syndrome
Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, corner fracture type (SMDCF) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature and a waddling gait in early childhood. Short stature may be present at birth or develop in early infancy. Individuals may present with short limbs and/or short trunk. Radiographic features include enlargement and corner fracture-like lesions of the metaphyses, developmental coxa vara, shortened long bones, scoliosis, and vertebral anomalies. Limited joint mobility and chronic pain are common. Vision impairment and glaucoma have been reported.
Brachyrachia (short spine dysplasia)
MedGen UID:
96583
Concept ID:
C0432227
Congenital Abnormality
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Langer mesomelic dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
96585
Concept ID:
C0432230
Disease or Syndrome
Langer mesomelic dysplasia (LMD) is characterized by severe limb aplasia or severe hypoplasia of the ulna and fibula, and a thickened and curved radius and tibia. These changes can result in displacement deformities of the hands and feet. Hypoplasia of the mandible is also observed (Langer, 1967). See also Leri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (127300), a less severe phenotype that results from heterozygous defect in the SHOX or SHOXY genes.
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, with severe proximal femoral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
324484
Concept ID:
C1836315
Congenital Abnormality
A rare primary bone dysplasia characterised by severe early-onset dysplasia of the proximal femurs, with almost complete absence of the secondary ossification centres and abnormal development of the femoral necks (short and broad with irregular metaphyses). It is associated with gait abnormality, mild short stature, arthralgia, and joint stiffness with limited mobility of the hips and irregular acetabula, and hip and knee pain. Coxa vara and mild spinal changes are also associated.
Czech dysplasia, metatarsal type
MedGen UID:
324580
Concept ID:
C1836683
Congenital Abnormality
Czech dysplasia is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by early-onset, progressive pseudorheumatoid arthritis, platyspondyly, and short third and fourth toes (Marik et al., 2004; Kozlowski et al., 2004).
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations
MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 1
MedGen UID:
325376
Concept ID:
C1838280
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) presents in early childhood, usually with pain in the hips and/or knees after exercise. Affected children complain of fatigue with long-distance walking. Waddling gait may be present. Adult height is either in the lower range of normal or mildly shortened. The limbs are relatively short in comparison to the trunk. Pain and joint deformity progress, resulting in early-onset osteoarthritis, particularly of the large weight-bearing joints.
Lipodystrophy-intellectual disability-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
334166
Concept ID:
C1842465
Disease or Syndrome
Lipodystrophy-intellectual disability-deafness syndrome is an extremely rare form of genetic lipodystrophy (see this term), reported in 3 patients from one family to date, characterized by generalized congenital lipodystrophy, low birth weight, progressive sensorineural deafness occurring in childhood, intellectual deficit, progressive osteopenia, delayed skeletal maturation, skeletal abnormalities described as slender, undermineralized tubular bones, and dense metaphyseal striations in the distal femur, ulna and radius of older patients. Autosomal recessive inheritance has been suggested.
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia
MedGen UID:
334681
Concept ID:
C1843096
Disease or Syndrome
Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia (ACFD) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by postnatal-onset disproportionate short stature, relatively large head, narrow thorax, lumbar lordosis, short limbs, and brachydactyly with small broad nails (Ozyavuz Cubuk and Duz, 2021).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Bieganski type
MedGen UID:
335350
Concept ID:
C1846148
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy (SEMDHL) is an X-linked recessive developmental disorder characterized by slowly progressive skeletal and neurologic abnormalities, including short stature, large and deformed joints, significant motor impairment, visual defects, and sometimes cognitive deficits. Affected individuals typically have normal early development in the first year or so of life, followed by development regression and the development of symptoms. Brain imaging shows white matter abnormalities consistent with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy (summary by Miyake et al., 2017).
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 5
MedGen UID:
335542
Concept ID:
C1846843
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) presents in early childhood, usually with pain in the hips and/or knees after exercise. Affected children complain of fatigue with long-distance walking. Waddling gait may be present. Adult height is either in the lower range of normal or mildly shortened. The limbs are relatively short in comparison to the trunk. Pain and joint deformity progress, resulting in early-onset osteoarthritis, particularly of the large weight-bearing joints.
Brachyolmia type 1, toledo type
MedGen UID:
376504
Concept ID:
C1849048
Disease or Syndrome
Brachyolmia type 1, Hobaek type
MedGen UID:
338605
Concept ID:
C1849055
Disease or Syndrome
Rock et al. (2008) provided an overview of the brachyolmias, a heterogeneous group of skeletal dysplasias that affect primarily the spine. Type 1 brachyolmia includes the Hobaek and Toledo (BCYM1B; 271630) forms, which are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. Both forms of type 1 are characterized by scoliosis, platyspondyly with rectangular and elongated vertebral bodies, overfaced pedicles, and irregular, narrow intervertebral spaces. The Toledo form is distinguished by the presence of corneal opacities and precocious calcification of the costal cartilage. Type 2 brachyolmia (BCYM2; 613678), sometimes referred to as the Maroteaux type, is also an autosomal recessive disorder, primarily distinguished from type 1 by rounded vertebral bodies and less overfaced pedicles. Some cases are associated with precocious calcification of the falx cerebri. Type 3 brachyolmia (BCYM3; 113500) is an autosomal dominant form, caused by mutation in the TRPV4 gene (605427), with severe kyphoscoliosis and flattened, irregular cervical vertebrae. Paradoxically, although the limbs are mildly shortened in all types of brachyolmia, they show minimal epiphyseal and metaphyseal abnormalities on radiographs. Type 4 brachyolmia (BCYM4; 612847) is an autosomal recessive form, caused by mutation in the PAPSS2 gene (603005), with mild epiphyseal and metaphyseal changes.
Saldino-Mainzer syndrome
MedGen UID:
341455
Concept ID:
C1849437
Disease or Syndrome
Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Genevieve type
MedGen UID:
355314
Concept ID:
C1864872
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia of the Genevieve type (SEMDG) is characterized by infantile-onset severe developmental delay and skeletal dysplasia, including short stature, premature carpal ossification, platyspondyly, longitudinal metaphyseal striations, and small epiphyses (summary by van Karnebeek et al., 2016).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Shohat type
MedGen UID:
400703
Concept ID:
C1865185
Disease or Syndrome
Shohat-type spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMDSH) is a chondrodysplasia characterized by vertebral, epiphyseal, and metaphyseal abnormalities, including scoliosis with vertebral compression fractures, flattened vertebral bodies, and hypomineralization of long bones. Affected individuals may exhibit a small trunk, short neck, small limbs, joint laxity, bowlegs, and/or abdominal distention with hepatosplenomegaly (summary by Egunsola et al., 2017).
Axial spondylometaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
356065
Concept ID:
C1865695
Disease or Syndrome
Axial spondylometaphyseal dysplasia (SMDAX) is characterized by postnatal growth failure, including rhizomelic short stature in early childhood that evolves into short trunk in late childhood, and thoracic hypoplasia that may cause mild to moderate respiratory problems in the neonatal period and later susceptibility to airway infection. Impaired visual acuity comes to medical attention in early life and vision rapidly deteriorates. Retinal changes are diagnosed as retinitis pigmentosa or pigmentary retinal degeneration on funduscopic examination and as cone-rod dystrophy on electroretinogram. Radiologic hallmarks include short ribs with flared and cupped anterior ends, mild spondylar dysplasia, lacy iliac crests, and metaphyseal irregularities essentially confined to the proximal femora (summary by Suzuki et al., 2011).
RHYNS syndrome
MedGen UID:
356371
Concept ID:
C1865794
Disease or Syndrome
RHYNS syndrome is characterized by gaze palsy, retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural hearing loss, hypopituitarism, nephronophthisis, and mild skeletal dysplasia (Di Rocco et al., 1997).
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, spondylocheirodysplastic type
MedGen UID:
393515
Concept ID:
C2676510
Disease or Syndrome
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome spondylodysplastic type 3 (EDSSPD3) is characterized by short stature, hyperelastic skin and hypermobile joints, protuberant eyes with bluish sclerae, finely wrinkled palms, and characteristic radiologic features (Giunta et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the spondylodysplastic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, see 130070.
Metaphyseal anadysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
414350
Concept ID:
C2751322
Disease or Syndrome
Any metaphyseal anadysplasia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MMP9 gene.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type
MedGen UID:
463613
Concept ID:
C3159322
Disease or Syndrome
The autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders (previously considered to be clinically distinct phenotypes before their molecular basis was discovered) are now grouped into neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias; however, the overlap within each group is considerable. Affected individuals typically have either neuromuscular or skeletal manifestations alone, and in only rare instances an overlap syndrome has been reported. The three autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders (mildest to most severe) are: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2C. Scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. The autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders are characterized by a congenital-onset, static, or later-onset progressive peripheral neuropathy with variable combinations of laryngeal dysfunction (i.e., vocal fold paresis), respiratory dysfunction, and joint contractures. The six autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias (mildest to most severe) are: Familial digital arthropathy-brachydactyly. Autosomal dominant brachyolmia. Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Kozlowski type. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Maroteaux type. Parastremmatic dysplasia. Metatropic dysplasia. The skeletal dysplasia is characterized by brachydactyly (in all 6); the five that are more severe have short stature that varies from mild to severe with progressive spinal deformity and involvement of the long bones and pelvis. In the mildest of the autosomal dominant TRPV4 disorders life span is normal; in the most severe it is shortened. Bilateral progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) can occur with both autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorders and skeletal dysplasias.
Stickler syndrome, type 4
MedGen UID:
481571
Concept ID:
C3279941
Disease or Syndrome
Stickler syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can include ocular findings of myopia, cataract, and retinal detachment; hearing loss that is both conductive and sensorineural; midfacial underdevelopment and cleft palate (either alone or as part of the Robin sequence); and mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and/or precocious arthritis. Variable phenotypic expression of Stickler syndrome occurs both within and among families; interfamilial variability is in part explained by locus and allelic heterogeneity.
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda, X-linked
MedGen UID:
762085
Concept ID:
C3541456
Congenital Abnormality
X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda is a condition that impairs bone growth and occurs almost exclusively in males. The name of the condition indicates that it affects the bones of the spine (spondylo-) and the ends of long bones (epiphyses) in the arms and legs. "Tarda" indicates that signs and symptoms of this condition are not present at birth, but appear later in childhood, typically between ages 6 and 10.\n\nMales with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have skeletal abnormalities and short stature. Affected boys grow steadily until late childhood, when their growth slows. Their adult height ranges from 4 feet 6 inches (137 cm) to 5 feet 4 inches (163 cm). Impaired growth of the spinal bones (vertebrae) primarily causes the short stature. Spinal abnormalities include flattened vertebrae (platyspondyly) with hump-shaped bulges, progressive thinning of the discs between vertebrae, and an abnormal curvature of the spine (scoliosis or kyphosis). These spinal problems also cause back pain in people with this condition. Individuals with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda have a short torso and neck, and their arms are disproportionately long compared to their height.\n\nOther skeletal features of X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda include an abnormality of the hip joint that causes the upper leg bones to turn inward (coxa vara); multiple abnormalities of the epiphyses, including a short upper end of the thigh bone (femoral neck); and a broad, barrel-shaped chest. A painful joint condition called osteoarthritis that typically occurs in older adults often develops in early adulthood in people with X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda and worsens over time, most often affecting the hips, knees, and shoulders.
Short stature-onychodysplasia-facial dysmorphism-hypotrichosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
762199
Concept ID:
C3542022
Disease or Syndrome
SOFT syndrome is characterized by severely short long bones, peculiar facies associated with paucity of hair, and nail anomalies. Growth retardation is evident on prenatal ultrasound as early as the second trimester of pregnancy, and affected individuals reach a final stature consistent with a height age of 6 years to 8 years. Relative macrocephaly is present during early childhood but head circumference is markedly low by adulthood. Psychomotor development is normal. Facial dysmorphism includes a long, triangular face with prominent nose and small ears, and affected individuals have an unusual high-pitched voice. Clinodactyly, brachydactyly, and hypoplastic distal phalanges and fingernails are present in association with postpubertal sparse and short hair. Typical skeletal findings include short and thick long bones with mild irregular metaphyseal changes, short femoral necks, and hypoplastic pelvis and sacrum. All long bones of the hand are short, with major delay of carpal ossification and cone-shaped epiphyses. Vertebral body ossification is also delayed (summary by Sarig et al., 2012).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
766431
Concept ID:
C3553517
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
Desbuquois dysplasia 1
MedGen UID:
860583
Concept ID:
C4012146
Disease or Syndrome
Desbuquois dysplasia (DBQD) is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia belonging to the multiple dislocation group and characterized by severe prenatal and postnatal growth retardation (stature less than -5 SD), joint laxity, short extremities, and progressive scoliosis. The main radiologic features are short long bones with metaphyseal splay, a 'Swedish key' appearance of the proximal femur (exaggerated trochanter), and advanced carpal and tarsal bone age with a delta phalanx (summary by Huber et al., 2009). Desbuquois dysplasia is clinically and radiographically heterogeneous, and had been classified into 2 types based on the presence (type 1) or absence (type 2) of characteristic hand anomalies, including an extra ossification center distal to the second metacarpal, delta phalanx, bifid distal thumb phalanx, and dislocation of the interphalangeal joints (Faivre et al., 2004). However, patients with and without these additional hand anomalies have been reported to have mutations in the same gene (see, e.g., CANT1); thus, these features are not distinctive criteria to predict the molecular basis of DBQD (Furuichi et al., 2011). In addition, Kim et al. (2010) described another milder variant of DBQD with almost normal outwardly appearing hands, but significant radiographic changes, including short metacarpals, elongated phalanges, and remarkably advanced carpal bone age. However, there is no accessory ossification center distal to the second metacarpal, and patients do not have thumb anomalies. Similar changes occur in the feet. These patients also tend to develop precocious osteoarthritis of the hand and spine with age. This phenotype is sometimes referred to as the 'Kim variant' of DBQD (Furuichi et al., 2011). Genetic Heterogeneity of Desbuquois Dysplasia DBQD2 (615777) is caused by mutation in the XYLT1 gene (608124) on chromosome 16p12. Two unrelated patients with immunodeficiency-23 (IMD23; 615816), due to mutation in the PGM3 gene (172100), were reported to have skeletal features reminiscent of DBQD.
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, type 1, with or without fractures
MedGen UID:
865814
Concept ID:
C4017377
Disease or Syndrome
Any spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the B3GALT6 gene.
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 5
MedGen UID:
900333
Concept ID:
C4225237
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by disproportionately short stature primarily affecting the proximal parts of the extremities, a typical facial appearance including a broad nasal bridge, epicanthus, high-arched palate, dysplastic external ears, and micrognathia, congenital contractures, characteristic ocular involvement, dwarfism, and severe mental retardation with spasticity. Biochemically, plasmalogen synthesis and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation are defective. Most patients die in the first decade of life (summary by Wanders and Waterham, 2005). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, see 215100.
Acromesomelic dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
904735
Concept ID:
C4225404
Disease or Syndrome
Sifrim-Hitz-Weiss syndrome
MedGen UID:
934655
Concept ID:
C4310688
Disease or Syndrome
CHD4 neurodevelopmental disorder (CHD4-NDD) is associated with developmental delay, speech delay, and usually mild-to-moderate intellectual disability. Variability between individuals with CHD4-NDD is significant, and a few have normal intelligence. Other manifestations can include brain anomalies, heart defects, and skeletal abnormalities; less common features are hypogonadism in males, hearing impairment, and ophthalmic abnormalities. Most affected individuals have mild nonspecific dysmorphic facial features with or without macrocephaly.
Anauxetic dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
1384439
Concept ID:
C4479357
Disease or Syndrome
Anauxetic dysplasia is a spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia characterized by severe short stature of prenatal onset, very short adult height (less than 1 meter), hypodontia, midface hypoplasia, and mild intellectual disability. Vertebrae are ovoid with concave dorsal surfaces in the lumbar region and show delayed bone maturation. Femoral heads and necks are hypoplastic, as are the iliac bodies. Long bones show irregular mineralization of the metaphyses. The first and fifth metacarpals are short and wide with small, late-ossifying epiphyses and bullet-shaped middle phalanges (summary by Barraza-Garcia et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of anauxetic dysplasia, see ANXD1 (607095).
Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 7
MedGen UID:
1620874
Concept ID:
C4540251
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts 1
MedGen UID:
1636142
Concept ID:
C4552029
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Regressive spondylometaphyseal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
1648288
Concept ID:
C4747922
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic skeletal dysplasia with or without Pelger-Huet anomaly (SKPHA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by rhizomelic skeletal dysplasia of variable severity with or without abnormal nuclear shape and chromatin organization in blood granulocytes (Hoffmann et al., 2002; Borovik et al., 2013; Collins et al., 2020). Initial skeletal features may improve with age (Sobreira et al., 2014).
Short stature, amelogenesis imperfecta, and skeletal dysplasia with scoliosis
MedGen UID:
1676818
Concept ID:
C5193055
Disease or Syndrome
Short stature, amelogenesis imperfecta, and skeletal dysplasia with scoliosis (SSASKS)is characterized by disproportionate short stature, defective tooth enamel formation, and skeletal dysplasia with severe scoliosis in some patients. Variable features include facial dysmorphism, moderate hearing impairment, and mildly impaired intellectual development (Ashikov et al., 2018).
Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, kondo-fu type
MedGen UID:
1683128
Concept ID:
C5193071
Disease or Syndrome
The Kondo-Fu type of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SEDKF) is characterized by severely retarded growth and skeletal anomalies, including spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with associated kyphosis and reduced bone mineral density. Elevated levels of blood lysosomal enzymes have also been observed (Kondo et al., 2018).
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity, type 3
MedGen UID:
1677378
Concept ID:
C5193073
Disease or Syndrome
Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity-3 (SEMDJL3) is characterized by multiple joint dislocations at birth, severe joint laxity, scoliosis, gracile metacarpals and metatarsals, delayed bone age, and poorly ossified carpal and tarsal bones (Girisha et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SEMD with joint laxity, see SEMDJL1 (271640).
Oculocerebrodental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1674537
Concept ID:
C5193101
Disease or Syndrome
Oculoskeletodental syndrome (OCSKD) is characterized by congenital cataract, short stature and various skeletal anomalies, dysmorphic facial features and dental anomalies, developmental delay, and stroke. Other recurrent features include hearing loss, secondary glaucoma, and nephrocalcinosis (Tiosano et al., 2019).
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
1741713
Concept ID:
C5436867
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome (MDPS) is an autosomal recessive severe laminopathy-like disorder characterized by growth retardation, bone resorption, arterial calcification, renal glomerulosclerosis, and hypertension (Elouej et al., 2020).
Rhizomelic dysplasia, Ain-Naz type
MedGen UID:
1794223
Concept ID:
C5562013
Disease or Syndrome
The Ain-Naz type of rhizomelic dysplasia (RHZDAN) is characterized by severe short stature with marked rhizomelic shortening of the limbs, platyspondyly, and large hands and feet relative to height (Ain et al., 2021).
Progressive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia-short stature-short fourth metatarsals-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
1800305
Concept ID:
C5568882
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic multiple congenital anomalies/dysmorphic syndrome with characteristics of global developmental delay and intellectual disability, progressive spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, short stature, short fourth metatarsals and dysmorphic craniofacial features (including microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, mild ptosis, strabismus, malar hypoplasia, short nose, depressed nasal bridge, full lips, small, low-set ears and short neck). Craniosynostosis, generalized hypotonia, as well as asymmetry of the cerebral hemispheres and mild thinning of the corpus callosum on brain imaging have also been described.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Tkacz R, Larysz D, Przybylski R, Tkacz M, Safranow K, Tarnowski M
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 Apr 13;19(8) doi: 10.3390/ijerph19084670. PMID: 35457538Free PMC Article
Kim YJ, Novais EN
J Pediatr Orthop 2011 Sep;31(2 Suppl):S235-40. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e3182260252. PMID: 21857445

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Lin H, Lai C, Zhou Z, Wang C, Yu X
J Orthop Sci 2023 Nov;28(6):1373-1378. Epub 2022 Oct 10 doi: 10.1016/j.jos.2022.09.006. PMID: 36229352
Tkacz R, Larysz D, Przybylski R, Tkacz M, Safranow K, Tarnowski M
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 Apr 13;19(8) doi: 10.3390/ijerph19084670. PMID: 35457538Free PMC Article
Christiansen JD, Ejaz A, Nielsen PT, Laursen M
J Bone Joint Surg Am 2020 Jan 15;102(2):128-136. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.19.00104. PMID: 31596796
Eidelman M, Keshet D, Nelson S, Bor N
J Pediatr Orthop 2019 Apr;39(4):181-186. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000906. PMID: 30839476
Akgül T, Şen C, Balci Hİ, Polat G
J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) 2016 Dec;24(3):387-391. doi: 10.1177/1602400324. PMID: 28031513

Diagnosis

Eidelman M, Keshet D, Nelson S, Bor N
J Pediatr Orthop 2019 Apr;39(4):181-186. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000906. PMID: 30839476
Kanojia RK, Gupta S, Kumar A, Reddy BK
Clin Orthop Relat Res 2018 Jul;476(7):1479-1490. doi: 10.1097/01.blo.0000533616.93007.46. PMID: 29698303Free PMC Article
Akgül T, Şen C, Balci Hİ, Polat G
J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) 2016 Dec;24(3):387-391. doi: 10.1177/1602400324. PMID: 28031513
Kim YJ, Novais EN
J Pediatr Orthop 2011 Sep;31(2 Suppl):S235-40. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e3182260252. PMID: 21857445
Toiviainen-Salo S, Linnankivi T, Saarinen A, Mäyränpää MK, Karikoski R, Mäkitie O
Am J Med Genet A 2011 Jun;155A(6):1322-8. Epub 2011 Apr 26 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.33994. PMID: 21523908

Therapy

Christiansen JD, Laursen M, Blunn GW, Nielsen PT
Acta Orthop 2024 Feb 23;95:138-146. doi: 10.2340/17453674.2024.40074. PMID: 38392247Free PMC Article
Hallert O, Li Y, Brismar H, Lindgren U
J Orthop Surg Res 2012 Apr 25;7:17. doi: 10.1186/1749-799X-7-17. PMID: 22533964Free PMC Article
Röhrl SM, Li MG, Pedersen E, Ullmark G, Nivbrant B
Clin Orthop Relat Res 2006 Jul;448:73-8. doi: 10.1097/01.blo.0000224000.87517.4c. PMID: 16826099

Prognosis

Christiansen JD, Laursen M, Blunn GW, Nielsen PT
Acta Orthop 2024 Feb 23;95:138-146. doi: 10.2340/17453674.2024.40074. PMID: 38392247Free PMC Article
Tkacz R, Larysz D, Przybylski R, Tkacz M, Safranow K, Tarnowski M
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 Apr 13;19(8) doi: 10.3390/ijerph19084670. PMID: 35457538Free PMC Article
Christiansen JD, Ejaz A, Nielsen PT, Laursen M
J Bone Joint Surg Am 2020 Jan 15;102(2):128-136. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.19.00104. PMID: 31596796
Eidelman M, Keshet D, Nelson S, Bor N
J Pediatr Orthop 2019 Apr;39(4):181-186. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000906. PMID: 30839476
Hasler CC, Morscher EW
J Pediatr Orthop B 1999 Oct;8(4):271-5. PMID: 10513363

Clinical prediction guides

Lin H, Lai C, Zhou Z, Wang C, Yu X
J Orthop Sci 2023 Nov;28(6):1373-1378. Epub 2022 Oct 10 doi: 10.1016/j.jos.2022.09.006. PMID: 36229352
Tkacz R, Larysz D, Przybylski R, Tkacz M, Safranow K, Tarnowski M
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 Apr 13;19(8) doi: 10.3390/ijerph19084670. PMID: 35457538Free PMC Article
Christiansen JD, Ejaz A, Nielsen PT, Laursen M
J Bone Joint Surg Am 2020 Jan 15;102(2):128-136. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.19.00104. PMID: 31596796
Kanojia RK, Gupta S, Kumar A, Reddy BK
Clin Orthop Relat Res 2018 Jul;476(7):1479-1490. doi: 10.1097/01.blo.0000533616.93007.46. PMID: 29698303Free PMC Article
Akgül T, Şen C, Balci Hİ, Polat G
J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong) 2016 Dec;24(3):387-391. doi: 10.1177/1602400324. PMID: 28031513

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