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Split hand

MedGen UID:
397570
Concept ID:
C2699510
Congenital Abnormality
Synonym: Split hand (disease)
SNOMED CT: Congenital cleft hand (13624003); Lobster-claw hand (13624003); Lobster claw hand (13624003)
 
HPO: HP:0001171
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0017449

Definition

A condition in which middle parts of the hand (fingers and metacarpals) are missing giving a cleft appearance. The severity is very variable ranging from slightly hypoplastic middle fingers over absent middel fingers as far as oligo- or monodactyl hands. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Dejerine-Sottas disease
MedGen UID:
3710
Concept ID:
C0011195
Disease or Syndrome
Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy is a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with onset in infancy. It can show autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. Affected individuals have delayed motor development due to severe distal motor and sensory impairment, resulting in difficulties in gait. Some patients have generalized hypotonia in infancy. Other features may include pes cavus, scoliosis, and sensory ataxia. Nerve conduction velocities are severely decreased (sometimes less than 10 m/s), and sural nerve biopsy shows severe loss of myelinated fibers (summary by Baets et al., 2011).
Focal dermal hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
42055
Concept ID:
C0016395
Disease or Syndrome
Focal dermal hypoplasia is a multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. Skin manifestations present at birth include atrophic and hypoplastic areas of skin; cutis aplasia; fat nodules in the dermis manifesting as soft, yellow-pink cutaneous nodules; and pigmentary changes. Verrucoid papillomas of the skin and mucous membranes may appear later. The nails can be ridged, dysplastic, or hypoplastic; hair can be sparse or absent. Limb malformations include oligo-/syndactyly and split hand/foot. Developmental abnormalities of the eye can include anophthalmia/microphthalmia, iris and chorioretinal coloboma, and lacrimal duct abnormalities. Craniofacial findings can include facial asymmetry, notched alae nasi, cleft lip and palate, and pointed chin. Occasional findings include dental anomalies, abdominal wall defects, diaphragmatic hernia, and renal anomalies. Psychomotor development is usually normal; some individuals have cognitive impairment.
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-II
MedGen UID:
7734
Concept ID:
C0026705
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; also known as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation. The vast majority of affected individuals are male; on rare occasion heterozygous females manifest findings. Age of onset, disease severity, and rate of progression vary significantly among affected males. In those with early progressive disease, CNS involvement (manifest primarily by progressive cognitive deterioration), progressive airway disease, and cardiac disease usually result in death in the first or second decade of life. In those with slowly progressive disease, the CNS is not (or is minimally) affected, although the effect of GAG accumulation on other organ systems may be early progressive to the same degree as in those who have progressive cognitive decline. Survival into the early adult years with normal intelligence is common in the slowly progressing form of the disease. Additional findings in both forms of MPS II include: short stature; macrocephaly with or without communicating hydrocephalus; macroglossia; hoarse voice; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hepatosplenomegaly; dysostosis multiplex; spinal stenosis; and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 6
MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS6) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004).
Pseudo-Hurler polydystrophy
MedGen UID:
10988
Concept ID:
C0033788
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis spectrum
MedGen UID:
66357
Concept ID:
C0221060
Disease or Syndrome
The most basic description of Moebius syndrome is a congenital facial palsy with impairment of ocular abduction. The facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) and abducens nerve (CN VI) are most frequently involved, but other cranial nerves may be involved as well. Other variable features include orofacial dysmorphism and limb malformations. Mental retardation has been reported in a subset of patients. Most cases of Moebius syndrome are sporadic, but familial occurrence has been reported (Verzijl et al., 2003). The definition of and diagnostic criteria for Moebius syndrome have been controversial and problematic. The syndrome has most frequently been confused with hereditary congenital facial paresis (HCFP; see 601471), which is restricted to involvement of the facial nerve and no other abnormalities. Verzijl et al. (2003) and Verzijl et al. (2005) concluded that HCFP and Moebius syndrome are distinct disorders, and that Moebius syndrome is a complex developmental disorder of the brainstem. Moebius syndrome was defined at the Moebius Syndrome Foundation Research Conference in 2007 as congenital, nonprogressive facial weakness with limited abduction of one or both eyes. Additional features can include hearing loss and other cranial nerve dysfunction, as well as motor, orofacial, musculoskeletal, neurodevelopmental, and social problems (summary by Webb et al., 2012). Kumar (1990) provided a review of Moebius syndrome, which was critiqued by Lipson et al. (1990). Briegel (2006) provided a review of Moebius sequence with special emphasis on neuropsychiatric findings.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type IA
MedGen UID:
75727
Concept ID:
C0270911
Disease or Syndrome
For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, see CMT1B (118200). CMT1A is the most common form of CMT. The average age of onset of clinical symptoms is 12.2 +/- 7.3 years. Slow nerve conduction velocity (NCV) less than 38 m/s is highly diagnostic and is a 100% penetrant phenotype independent of age (Lupski et al., 1991, 1992).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B
MedGen UID:
124377
Concept ID:
C0270912
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a sensorineural peripheral polyneuropathy. Affecting approximately 1 in 2,500 individuals, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the most common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system (Skre, 1974). Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms have been recognized. Classification On the basis of electrophysiologic properties and histopathology, CMT has been divided into primary peripheral demyelinating (type 1, or HMSNI) and primary peripheral axonal (type 2, or HMSNII) neuropathies. The demyelinating neuropathies classified as CMT type 1 are characterized by severely reduced motor NCVs (less than 38 m/s) and segmental demyelination and remyelination with onion bulb formations on nerve biopsy. The axonal neuropathies classified as CMT type 2 are characterized by normal or mildly reduced NCVs and chronic axonal degeneration and regeneration on nerve biopsy (see CMT2A1; 118210). Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) (see 158590), or spinal CMT, is characterized by exclusive motor involvement and sparing of sensory nerves (Pareyson, 1999). McAlpine (1989) proposed that the forms of CMT with very slow nerve conduction be given the gene symbol CMT1A (118220) and CMT1B, CMT1A being the gene on chromosome 17 and CMT1B being the gene on chromosome 1. CMT2 was the proposed symbol for the autosomal locus responsible for the moderately slow nerve conduction form of the disease (axonal). For a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of the various subtypes of CMT, see CMTX1 (302800), CMT2A1 (118210), CMT3 (DSS; 145900), CMT4A (214400), and CMTDIB (606482). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Dominant Demyelinating CMT1 Autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT1 is a genetically heterogeneous disorder and can be caused by mutations in different genes; see CMT1A (118220), CMT1C (601098), CMT1D (607678), CMT1E (607734), CMT1F (607734), CMT1G (618279), CMT1H (619764), CMT1I (619742), and CMT1J (620111). See also 608236 for a related phenotype characterized by isolated slowed nerve conduction velocities (NCVs).
Bifunctional peroxisomal enzyme deficiency
MedGen UID:
137982
Concept ID:
C0342870
Pathologic Function
D-bifunctional protein deficiency is a disorder of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. See also peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase deficiency (264470), caused by mutation in the ACOX1 gene (609751) on chromosome 17q25. The clinical manifestations of these 2 deficiencies are similar to those of disorders of peroxisomal assembly, including X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD; 300100), Zellweger cerebrohepatorenal syndrome (see 214100) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD; see 601539) (Watkins et al., 1995). DBP deficiency has been classified into 3 subtypes depending upon the deficient enzyme activity. Type I is a deficiency of both 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase; type II is a deficiency of hydratase activity alone; and type III is a deficiency of dehydrogenase activity alone. Virtually all patients with types I, II, and III have a severe phenotype characterized by infantile-onset of hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal facial features, and most die before age 2 years. McMillan et al. (2012) proposed a type IV deficiency on the basis of less severe features; these patients have a phenotype reminiscent of Perrault syndrome (PRLTS1; 233400). Pierce et al. (2010) noted that Perrault syndrome and DBP deficiency overlap clinically and suggested that DBP deficiency may be underdiagnosed.
Acrocardiofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
324947
Concept ID:
C1838121
Disease or Syndrome
A rare genetic disorder characterised by split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM), facial anomalies, cleft lip/palate, congenital heart defect (CHD), genital anomalies, and intellectual deficit.
Split hand-foot malformation 3
MedGen UID:
325070
Concept ID:
C1838652
Disease or Syndrome
Split-hand/split-foot malformation is a limb malformation involving the central rays of the autopod and presenting with syndactyly, median clefts of the hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Some patients with SHFM3 have been found to have mental retardation, ectodermal and craniofacial findings, and orofacial clefting (Elliott and Evans, 2006). For additional phenotypic information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity in this disorder, see SHFM1 (183600).
Split hand-foot malformation 2
MedGen UID:
326848
Concept ID:
C1839258
Disease or Syndrome
Split-hand/split-foot malformation is a limb malformation involving the central rays of the autopod and presenting with syndactyly, median clefts of the hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals (Elliott and Evans, 2006). For additional phenotypic information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of split-hand/split-foot malformation, see SHFM1 (183600).
Mullerian duct anomalies-limb anomalies syndrome
MedGen UID:
327078
Concept ID:
C1840335
Disease or Syndrome
Mullerian duct anomalies-limb anomalies syndrome is characterised by the association of mullerian duct and distal limb anomalies. It has been described in five individuals from one family. Females presented with anomalies ranging from a vaginal septum to complete duplication of uterus and vagina, and males presented with micropenis. The limb anomalies varied from postaxial polydactyly to severe upper limb hypoplasia with split hand. The mode of transmission is autosomal dominant.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2K
MedGen UID:
375064
Concept ID:
C1842983
Disease or Syndrome
A severe early-onset form of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth peripheral sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Onset occurs in the neonatal period or early infancy with a clinical picture including hypotonia, scoliosis, a hoarse voice, vocal cord paralysis and respiratory insufficiency. However, nerve conduction velocities and pathological findings from sural nerve biopsies are indicative of a predominantly axonal neuropathy with some demyelinating features. Caused by mutations in the GDAP1 gene (8q13.3), encoding a protein required for mitochondrial fission.
Schinzel phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
336388
Concept ID:
C1848651
Disease or Syndrome
The Al-Awadi/Raas-Rothschild/Schinzel phocomelia syndrome (AARRS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe malformations of upper and lower limbs with severely hypoplastic pelvis and abnormal genitalia. The disorder is believed to represent a defect of dorsoventral patterning and outgrowth of limbs (summary by Kantaputra et al., 2010).
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis arthropathy spectrum
MedGen UID:
342428
Concept ID:
C1850155
Disease or Syndrome
Multicentric osteolysis nodulosis and arthropathy (MONA) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by progressive osteolysis (particularly of the carpal and tarsal bones), osteoporosis, subcutaneous nodules on the palms and soles, and progressive arthropathy (joint contractures, pain, swelling, and stiffness). Other manifestations include coarse facies, pigmented skin lesions, cardiac defects, and corneal opacities. Onset is usually between ages six months and six years (range: birth to 11 years).
Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip-palate syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
343663
Concept ID:
C1851841
Disease or Syndrome
An EEC syndrome characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 7q11.2-q21.3.
Split hand-foot malformation 4
MedGen UID:
343120
Concept ID:
C1854442
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Intellectual disability-spasticity-ectrodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
340888
Concept ID:
C1855501
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual disability-spasticity-ectrodactyly syndrome is a rare intellectual disability syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, spastic paraplegia (with wasting of the lower limbs) and distal transverse defects of the limbs (e.g. ectrodactyly, syndactyly, clinodactyly of the hands and/or feet).
Gollop-Wolfgang complex
MedGen UID:
341622
Concept ID:
C1856789
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare malformation with main features of ectrodactyly of the hand and ipsilateral bifurcation of the femur. Approximately 200 cases have been reported worldwide. Congenital aplasia/hypoplasia of the tibia, accompanied by pre-axial oligodactyly or monodactyly of the feet, may also be present. In most cases, the bifurcation of the distal femur is unilateral. Patients are often small. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of transmission have been suggested.
Ectrodactyly-polydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
384042
Concept ID:
C1857040
Disease or Syndrome
Ectrodactyly-polydactyly syndrome is a rare, genetic, congenital limb malformation disorder characterized by hypoplasia or absence of central digital rays of the hands and/or feet and the presence of one or more, unilateral or bilateral, supernumerary digits on postaxial rays, ranging from hypoplastic digits devoid of osseous structures to complete duplication of a digit. Cutaneous syndactyly, symphalangism and clinodactyly have also been reported. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1982.
EEM syndrome
MedGen UID:
341679
Concept ID:
C1857041
Congenital Abnormality
EEM syndrome denotes a disorder characterized by ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly, and macular dystrophy. The ectodermal dysplasia consists of hypotrichosis affecting scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, with partial anodontia. Different degrees of absence deformities as well as syndactyly have been described, the hands often being more severely affected than the feet. The retinal lesion appears as a central geographic atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillary layer of the macular area with coarse hyperpigmentations and sparing of the larger choroidal vessels (summary by Kjaer et al., 2005).
Split hand-foot malformation 1 with sensorineural hearing loss
MedGen UID:
347431
Concept ID:
C1857344
Congenital Abnormality
Split-hand/foot malformation-1 with sensorineural hearing loss (SHFM1D) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe limb defects and moderate to severe hearing loss. There is nearly complete palmar dorsalization, with circumferential fingernails (Shamseldin et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of split-hand/foot malformation, see SHFM1 (183600).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2
MedGen UID:
346869
Concept ID:
C1858278
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4B2 (CMT4B2) is a demyelinating hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy characterized by abnormal folding of myelin sheaths. CMT4B1 (601382) is a clinically similar disorder caused by mutation in the MTMR2 gene (603557) on 11q22. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT, see CMT4A (214400).
Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip-palate syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
347666
Concept ID:
C1858562
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Congenital cataracts-facial dysmorphism-neuropathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
346973
Concept ID:
C1858726
Congenital Abnormality
CTDP1-related congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, and neuropathy (CTDP1-CCFDN) is characterized by abnormalities of the eye (bilateral congenital cataracts, microcornea, microphthalmia, micropupils), mildly dysmorphic facial features apparent in late childhood, and a hypo-/demyelinating, symmetric, distal peripheral neuropathy. The neuropathy is predominantly motor at the onset and results in delays in early motor development, progressing to severe disability by the third decade of life. Secondary foot deformities and scoliosis are common. Sensory neuropathy develops after age ten years. Most affected individuals have a mild nonprogressive intellectual deficit and cerebellar involvement including ataxia, nystagmus, intention tremor, and dysmetria. All have short stature and most have subnormal weight. Adults have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Parainfectious rhabdomyolysis (profound muscle weakness, myoglobinuria, and excessively elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase usually following a viral infection) is a potentially life-threatening complication. To date all affected individuals and carriers identified have been from the Romani population.
Acro-renal-mandibular syndrome
MedGen UID:
395425
Concept ID:
C1860166
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of limb deficiencies and renal anomalies that include split hand-split foot malformation, renal agenesis, polycystic kidneys, uterine anomalies and severe mandibular hypoplasia.
Triphalangeal thumbs-brachyectrodactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
348710
Concept ID:
C1860804
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome has characteristics of triphalangeal thumbs and brachydactyly of the hands. Ectrodactyly of the feet and, more rarely, ectrodactyly of the hands were also reported in some family members. Transmission is autosomal dominant.
Tetramelic monodactyly
MedGen UID:
349989
Concept ID:
C1861233
Congenital Abnormality
A rare genetic congenital limb malformation disorder with characteristics of the presence of a single digit on all four extremities. The malformation is typically isolated however, aplastic and hypoplastic defects in the remaining skeletal parts of hands and feet have been reported. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1992.
Split-hand/foot malformation with long bone deficiency 1
MedGen UID:
349310
Concept ID:
C1861553
Disease or Syndrome
Anonychia-ectrodactyly
MedGen UID:
354849
Concept ID:
C1862843
Disease or Syndrome
Aglossia-adactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
354928
Concept ID:
C1863203
Disease or Syndrome
Hypoglossia-hypodactyly syndrome is characterized by a hypoplastic mandible, absence of the lower incisors, hypoglossia, and a variable degree of absence of the digits and limbs. Intelligence is normal (Hall, 1971). Hall (1971) classified what he termed the 'syndromes of oromandibular and limb hypogenesis,' which comprised a range of disorders with hypoglossia in common. Type I included hypoglossia and aglossia in isolation. Type II included hypoglossia with hypomelia/hypodactylia. Type III included glossopalatine ankylosis with hypoglossia or hypoglossia and hypomelia/hypodactyly. Type IV included intraoral bands with fusion with hypoglossia or hypoglossia and hypomelia/hypodactyly. Type V included several syndromes, such as Hanhart syndrome, Pierre Robin syndrome (261800), Moebius syndrome (157900), and amniotic band syndrome (217100). Hall (1971) noted that complete aglossia or adactylia had not been reported, and suggested that 'hypoglossia-hypodactylia' is a more accurate term. See also hypoglossia and situs inversus (612776).
ADULT syndrome
MedGen UID:
400232
Concept ID:
C1863204
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Limb-mammary syndrome
MedGen UID:
355051
Concept ID:
C1863753
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 10
MedGen UID:
350481
Concept ID:
C1864669
Disease or Syndrome
The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; CLN) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the intracellular accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment storage material in different patterns ultrastructurally. The clinical course includes progressive dementia, seizures, and progressive visual failure (Mole et al., 2005). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, see CLN1 (256730).
Finnish upper limb-onset distal myopathy
MedGen UID:
400595
Concept ID:
C1864706
Disease or Syndrome
Distal myopathy-3 (MPD3) is an autosomal dominant skeletal muscle disorder characterized by adult onset of slowly progressive distal muscular weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs, leading to difficulties using the hands and walking difficulties. Proximal muscle involvement may occur later in the disease, but patients typically remain ambulatory. Muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with rimmed vacuoles (Hackman et al., 2021).
Brachyphalangy, polydactyly, and tibial aplasia/hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
355340
Concept ID:
C1864965
Disease or Syndrome
Karsch-Neugebauer syndrome
MedGen UID:
401072
Concept ID:
C1866740
Disease or Syndrome
A rare syndrome with characteristics of split-hand and split-foot deformity and ocular abnormalities mainly a congenital nystagmus. Ten cases from four families have been reported in the literature. In some cases the hands are monodactylous. The affected patients have normal mental development. The condition seems to be autosomal dominant with a relatively high proportion of gonadal mosaicism.
Split-hand and split-foot with hypodontia
MedGen UID:
357125
Concept ID:
C1866742
Disease or Syndrome
4p partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
408255
Concept ID:
C1956097
Disease or Syndrome
Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, developmental disability of variable degree, characteristic craniofacial features ('Greek warrior helmet' appearance of the nose, high forehead, prominent glabella, hypertelorism, high-arched eyebrows, protruding eyes, epicanthal folds, short philtrum, distinct mouth with downturned corners, and micrognathia), and a seizure disorder (Battaglia et al., 2008).
Mucolipidosis type II
MedGen UID:
435914
Concept ID:
C2673377
Disease or Syndrome
GNPTAB-related disorders comprise the phenotypes mucolipidosis II (ML II) and mucolipidosis IIIa/ß (ML IIIa/ß), and phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß. ML II is evident at birth and slowly progressive; death most often occurs in early childhood. Orthopedic abnormalities present at birth may include thoracic deformity, kyphosis, clubfeet, deformed long bones, and/or dislocation of the hip(s). Growth often ceases in the second year of life; contractures develop in all large joints. The skin is thickened, facial features are coarse, and gingiva are hypertrophic. All children have cardiac involvement, most commonly thickening and insufficiency of the mitral valve and, less frequently, the aortic valve. Progressive mucosal thickening narrows the airways, and gradual stiffening of the thoracic cage contributes to respiratory insufficiency, the most common cause of death. ML IIIa/ß becomes evident at about age three years with slow growth rate and short stature; joint stiffness and pain initially in the shoulders, hips, and fingers; gradual mild coarsening of facial features; and normal to mildly impaired cognitive development. Pain from osteoporosis becomes more severe during adolescence. Cardiorespiratory complications (restrictive lung disease, thickening and insufficiency of the mitral and aortic valves, left and/or right ventricular hypertrophy) are common causes of death, typically in early to middle adulthood. Phenotypes intermediate between ML II and ML IIIa/ß are characterized by physical growth in infancy that resembles that of ML II and neuromotor and speech development that resemble that of ML IIIa/ß.
Chromosome 17P13.3, telomeric, duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
390813
Concept ID:
C2675492
Disease or Syndrome
Split hand-foot malformation 6
MedGen UID:
440845
Concept ID:
C2749665
Disease or Syndrome
Split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM) is a limb malformation involving the central rays of the autopod and presenting with syndactyly, median clefts of the hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Some patients with SHFM have been found to have mental retardation, ectodermal and craniofacial findings, and orofacial clefting (Elliott and Evans, 2006). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of split-hand/foot malformations, see SHFM1 (183600).
Split hand-foot malformation 1
MedGen UID:
419314
Concept ID:
C2931019
Congenital Abnormality
Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM) is a limb malformation involving the central rays of the autopod and presenting with syndactyly, median clefts of the hands and feet, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Some patients with SHFM1 have been found to have mental retardation, ectodermal and craniofacial findings, orofacial clefting (Elliott and Evans, 2006), and neurosensory hearing loss (Tackels-Horne et al., 2001). Genetic Heterogeneity of Split-Hand/Foot Malformation Additional SHFM loci include SHFM2 (313350) on chromosome Xq26; SHFM3 (246560), caused by duplication of chromosome 10q24; SHFM4 (605289), caused by mutation in the TP63 gene (603273) on chromosome 3q28; SHFM5 (606708) on chromosome 2q31; and SHFM6 (225300), caused by mutation in the WNT10B gene (601906) on chromosome 12q13. Also see SHFM1D (220600) for a form of SHFM1 with deafness that may be caused by homozygous mutation in the DLX5 gene (600028). Associations Pending Confirmation For discussion of a possible association between split-hand/foot malformation and variation in the EPS15L1 gene, see 616826.0001.
Hereditary spastic paraplegia 17
MedGen UID:
419034
Concept ID:
C2931276
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of BSCL2-related neurologic disorders includes Silver syndrome and variants of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) type V, and spastic paraplegia 17. Features of these disorders include onset of symptoms ranging from the first to the seventh decade, slow disease progression, upper motor neuron involvement (gait disturbance with pyramidal signs ranging from mild to severe spasticity with hyperreflexia in the lower limbs and variable extensor plantar responses), lower motor neuron involvement (amyotrophy of the peroneal muscles and small muscles of the hand), and pes cavus and other foot deformities. Disease severity is variable among and within families.
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1E
MedGen UID:
501212
Concept ID:
C3495591
Disease or Syndrome
A rare subtype of CMT1 characterized by a variable clinical presentation. Onset within the first two years of life with a delay in walking is not uncommon; however, onset may occur later. CMT1E is caused by point mutations in the <i>PMP22</i> (17p12) gene. The disease severity depends on the particular <i>PMP22</i> mutation, with some cases being very mild and even resembling hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, while others having an earlier onset with a more severe phenotype (reminiscent of Dejerine-Sottas syndrome) than that seen in CMT1A, caused by gene duplication. These severe cases may also report deafness and much slower motor nerve conduction velocities compared to CMT1A patients.
Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
766452
Concept ID:
C3553538
Disease or Syndrome
Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome-2 (BVVLS2) is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder characterized by early childhood onset of sensorineural deafness, bulbar dysfunction, and severe diffuse muscle weakness and wasting of the upper and lower limbs and axial muscles, resulting in respiratory insufficiency. Some patients may lose independent ambulation. Because it results from a defect in riboflavin metabolism, some patients may benefit from high-dose riboflavin supplementation (summary by Johnson et al., 2012; Foley et al., 2014). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, see BVVLS1 (211530).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate G
MedGen UID:
1642893
Concept ID:
C4693509
Disease or Syndrome
CMTDIG is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have onset in the first or second decades of slowly progressive distal motor weakness and atrophy, resulting in gait instability and distal upper limb impairment, as well as distal sensory impairment. More severely affected individuals may have pes cavus and claw hands and become wheelchair-bound, whereas other affected individuals have later onset with a milder disease course. Electrophysiologic studies tend to show median motor nerve conduction velocities (NCV) in the 'intermediate' range, between 25 and 45 m/s (summary by Berciano et al., 2017). In a review of intermediate CMT, Berciano et al. (2017) noted that advanced axonal degeneration may induce secondary demyelinating changes resulting in decreased NCV and attenuated compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in median nerve conduction studies. They thus suggested that testing the upper arm, axilla to elbow, may provide more accurate assessment of NCV and CMAP and reveal an intermediate phenotype (review by Berciano et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CMTDI, see 606482.
Peripheral neuropathy, autosomal recessive, with or without impaired intellectual development
MedGen UID:
1648480
Concept ID:
C4748283
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive peripheral neuropathy with or without impaired intellectual development is an early childhood-onset neurologic disorder characterized by slowly progressive distal motor impairment resulting in gait difficulties, often with loss of ambulation, and difficulties using the hands in most patients. Most affected individuals also have impaired intellectual development, although some have normal cognition. Electrophysiologic testing and sural nerve biopsy are most compatible with an axonal motor neuropathy; some patients may show signs of demyelination. Additional features may include eye movement abnormalities, claw hands, foot deformities, and scoliosis (summary by Ylikallio et al., 2017).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with ataxia, hypotonia, and microcephaly
MedGen UID:
1684871
Concept ID:
C5231413
Disease or Syndrome
FG syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1768809
Concept ID:
C5399762
Disease or Syndrome
MED12-related disorders include the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), X-linked Ohdo syndrome (XLOS), Hardikar syndrome (HS), and nonspecific intellectual disability (NSID). FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. XLOS is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. HS has been described in females with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, biliary and liver anomalies, intestinal malrotation, pigmentary retinopathy, and coarctation of the aorta. Developmental and cognitive concerns have not been reported in females with HS. Pathogenic variants in MED12 have been reported in an increasing number of males and females with NSID, with affected individuals often having clinical features identified in other MED12-related disorders.
Split-foot malformation-mesoaxial polydactyly syndrome
MedGen UID:
1798910
Concept ID:
C5567487
Disease or Syndrome
Split-foot malformation with mesoaxial polydactyly (SFMMP) is characterized by a split-foot defect and nail abnormalities of the hands, as well as hearing loss in some patients (Spielmann et al., 2016).
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease axonal type 2Z
MedGen UID:
1800448
Concept ID:
C5569025
Disease or Syndrome
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2Z (CMT2Z) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by onset, usually in the first decade, of distal lower limb muscle weakness and sensory impairment. The disorder is progressive, and affected individuals tend to develop upper limb and proximal muscle involvement in an asymmetric pattern, resulting in severe disability late in adulthood. Rare occurrence of global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development or learning difficulties has been observed. In some instances, the same mutation may result in different phenotypic manifestations (CMT2Z or DIGFAN), which highlights the clinical spectrum associated with MORC2 mutations and may render the classification of patients into one or the other disorder challenging (summary by Sevilla et al., 2016, Ando et al., 2017, Guillen Sacoto et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of axonal CMT, see CMT2A1 (118210).
Patterson-Stevenson-Fontaine syndrome
MedGen UID:
1808766
Concept ID:
C5574964
Disease or Syndrome
A very rare variant of acrofacial dysostosis with characteristics of mandibulofacial dysostosis and limb anomalies. It has been described in less than ten patients. The mandibulofacial dysostosis consists of retrognathism, complete or occult posterior cleft palate and anomalies of the external ears. Limb anomalies consist of split-foot deformity with syndactyly of some toes. The condition is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with variable penetrance and expressivity.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Prado MB Jr, Hamoy-Jimenez G, Adiao KJ
J Clin Neurosci 2023 Jun;112:68-72. Epub 2023 Apr 25 doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2023.04.016. PMID: 37104886
Sowińska-Seidler A, Socha M, Jamsheer A
J Appl Genet 2014 Feb;55(1):105-15. Epub 2013 Oct 27 doi: 10.1007/s13353-013-0178-5. PMID: 24163146Free PMC Article
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Am J Hum Genet 2001 Sep;69(3):481-92. Epub 2001 Jul 17 doi: 10.1086/323123. PMID: 11462173Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Avidan R, Fainmesser Y, Drory VE, Bril V, Abraham A
Can J Neurol Sci 2023 Mar;50(2):228-233. Epub 2022 Feb 22 doi: 10.1017/cjn.2022.20. PMID: 35190003
Hu N, Wang J, Liu M
J Clin Neurosci 2021 Aug;90:293-301. Epub 2021 Jun 21 doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2021.06.015. PMID: 34275566
Guero S, Holder-Espinasse M
J Hand Surg Eur Vol 2019 Jan;44(1):80-87. Epub 2018 Oct 31 doi: 10.1177/1753193418807375. PMID: 30380990
Gurrieri F, Everman DB
Am J Med Genet A 2013 Nov;161A(11):2860-72. Epub 2013 Sep 24 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.36239. PMID: 24115638
Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2010 Sep 29;5:25. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-5-25. PMID: 20920258Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Lu WZ, Lin HA, Hou SK, Lee CF, Bai CH, Lin SF
Clin Neurophysiol 2022 Nov;143:56-66. Epub 2022 Sep 6 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2022.08.020. PMID: 36116424
Corcia P, Bede P, Pradat PF, Couratier P, Vucic S, de Carvalho M
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2021 Oct;92(10):1126-1130. Epub 2021 Jul 20 doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2021-326266. PMID: 34285065
Fete TJ, Fete M
Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2016 Mar;172C(1):3-6. Epub 2016 Feb 1 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.c.31475. PMID: 26834080
Wilcox WR, Coulter CP, Schmitz ML
Clin Perinatol 2015 Jun;42(2):281-300, viii. doi: 10.1016/j.clp.2015.02.004. PMID: 26042905
Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2010 Sep 29;5:25. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-5-25. PMID: 20920258Free PMC Article

Therapy

Hannaford A, Byth K, Pavey N, Henderson RD, Mathers S, Needham M, Schultz D, Menon P, Kiernan MC, Vucic S
Muscle Nerve 2023 Jan;67(1):17-24. Epub 2022 Oct 25 doi: 10.1002/mus.27736. PMID: 36214183
Iraji F, Mousavi A, Poostiyan N, Saber M
J Cosmet Dermatol 2022 Dec;21(12):6776-6782. Epub 2022 Oct 3 doi: 10.1111/jocd.15385. PMID: 36102447
Hannaford A, Higashihara M, Pavey N, van den Bos M, Geevasinga N, Vucic S, Menon P
Clin Neurophysiol 2021 Sep;132(9):2130-2135. Epub 2021 Jun 25 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2021.06.008. PMID: 34284248
Moradi A, Allen S, Bank D, Marmur E, Fagien S, Glaser DA, Maguire C, Cohen JL
Plast Reconstr Surg 2019 Oct;144(4):586e-596e. doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000006070. PMID: 31568288Free PMC Article
Wu DC, Goldman MP
Dermatol Surg 2018 Apr;44(4):534-541. doi: 10.1097/DSS.0000000000001325. PMID: 29406482

Prognosis

Hannaford A, Byth K, Pavey N, Henderson RD, Mathers S, Needham M, Schultz D, Menon P, Kiernan MC, Vucic S
Muscle Nerve 2023 Jan;67(1):17-24. Epub 2022 Oct 25 doi: 10.1002/mus.27736. PMID: 36214183
Zhang D, Geng H, Cao L, Li W
J Clin Neurophysiol 2022 May 1;39(4):317-323. Epub 2020 Nov 20 doi: 10.1097/WNP.0000000000000771. PMID: 32852287
Hannaford A, Higashihara M, Pavey N, van den Bos M, Geevasinga N, Vucic S, Menon P
Clin Neurophysiol 2021 Sep;132(9):2130-2135. Epub 2021 Jun 25 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2021.06.008. PMID: 34284248
Yang X, Lin X, Zhu Y, Luo J, Lin G
Mol Med Rep 2018 Jun;17(6):7553-7558. Epub 2018 Mar 29 doi: 10.3892/mmr.2018.8838. PMID: 29620206Free PMC Article
Digilio MC, Dallapiccola B
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2010 Sep 29;5:25. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-5-25. PMID: 20920258Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Hannaford A, Byth K, Pavey N, Henderson RD, Mathers S, Needham M, Schultz D, Menon P, Kiernan MC, Vucic S
Muscle Nerve 2023 Jan;67(1):17-24. Epub 2022 Oct 25 doi: 10.1002/mus.27736. PMID: 36214183
Zhang D, Geng H, Cao L, Li W
J Clin Neurophysiol 2022 May 1;39(4):317-323. Epub 2020 Nov 20 doi: 10.1097/WNP.0000000000000771. PMID: 32852287
Yang X, Lin X, Zhu Y, Luo J, Lin G
Mol Med Rep 2018 Jun;17(6):7553-7558. Epub 2018 Mar 29 doi: 10.3892/mmr.2018.8838. PMID: 29620206Free PMC Article
Yang ZK, Yang JY, Xu ZZ, Yu WH
Chin Med J (Engl) 2018 Apr 5;131(7):845-851. doi: 10.4103/0366-6999.228229. PMID: 29578129Free PMC Article
Turner MR, Talbot K
Pract Neurol 2013 Jun;13(3):153-64. Epub 2013 Apr 24 doi: 10.1136/practneurol-2013-000557. PMID: 23616620Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Ahmad S, Ali MZ, Muzammal M, Mir FA, Khan MA
Mol Genet Genomics 2022 Sep;297(5):1195-1214. Epub 2022 Jul 30 doi: 10.1007/s00438-022-01930-1. PMID: 35907958
Hu N, Wang J, Liu M
J Clin Neurosci 2021 Aug;90:293-301. Epub 2021 Jun 21 doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2021.06.015. PMID: 34275566

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