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Osteogenesis imperfecta type 5(OI5)

MedGen UID:
419332
Concept ID:
C2931093
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: OI type 5; OI5; OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA, TYPE V; Type V OI
SNOMED CT: Osteogenesis imperfecta type V (1003379004); Osteogenesis imperfecta type 5 (1003379004)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
Autosomal dominant inheritance
MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in heterozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, an autosomal dominant disorder is caused when a single copy of the mutant allele is present. Males and females are affected equally, and can both transmit the disorder with a risk of 50% for each child of inheriting the mutant allele.
 
Gene (location): IFITM5 (11p15.5)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0012591
OMIM®: 610967
Orphanet: ORPHA216828

Definition

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. Due to considerable phenotypic variability, Sillence et al. (1979) developed a classification of OI subtypes based on clinical features and disease severity: OI type I, with blue sclerae (166200); perinatal lethal OI type II, also known as congenital OI (166210); OI type III, a progressively deforming form with normal sclerae (259420); and OI type IV, with normal sclerae (166220). Most forms of OI are autosomal dominant with mutations in one of the 2 genes that code for type I collagen alpha chains, COL1A1 (120150) and COL1A2 (120160). Glorieux et al. (2000) described a novel autosomal dominant form of OI, which they designated OI type V (OI5), in 7 patients. The disorder was similar to OI type IV but had distinctive clinical, histologic, and molecular characteristics. OI type V is characterized by calcification of the forearm interosseous membrane, radial head dislocation, a subphyseal metaphyseal radiodense line, and hyperplastic callus formation (summary by Cho et al., 2012). OI type V has a variable phenotype. For example, in patients with the more common c.-14C-T variant (614757.0001), distinctive radiographic findings (calcification of the forearm interosseous membrane, radial head dislocation, a subphyseal metaphyseal radiodense line, and hyperplastic callus formation) are often seen, whereas these findings are not seen in patients with the less common S40L variant (614757.0002). [from OMIM]

Additional description

From MedlinePlus Genetics
Other types of osteogenesis imperfecta are more severe, causing frequent bone fractures that are present at birth and result from little or no trauma. Additional features of these types can include blue sclerae of the eyes, short stature, curvature of the spine (scoliosis), joint deformities (contractures), hearing loss, respiratory problems, and a disorder of tooth development called dentinogenesis imperfecta. Mobility can be reduced in affected individuals, and some may use a walker or wheelchair. The most severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, particularly type II, can include an abnormally small, fragile rib cage and underdeveloped lungs. Infants with these abnormalities may have life-threatening problems with breathing and can die shortly after birth.

The milder forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, including type I, are characterized by bone fractures during childhood and adolescence that often result from minor trauma, such as falling while learning to walk. Fractures occur less frequently in adulthood. People with mild forms of the condition typically have a blue or grey tint to the part of the eye that is usually white (the sclera), and about half develop hearing loss in adulthood. Unlike more severely affected individuals, people with type I are usually of normal or near normal height.

There are at least 19 recognized forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, designated type I through type XIX. Several types are distinguished by their signs and symptoms, although their characteristic features overlap. Increasingly, genetic causes are used to define rarer forms of osteogenesis imperfecta. Type I (also known as classic non-deforming osteogenesis imperfecta with blue sclerae) is the mildest form of osteogenesis imperfecta. Type II (also known as perinatally lethal osteogenesis imperfecta) is the most severe. Other types of this condition, including types III (progressively deforming osteogenesis imperfecta) and IV (common variable osteogenesis imperfecta with normal sclerae), have signs and symptoms that fall somewhere between these two extremes.

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of genetic disorders that mainly affect the bones. The term "osteogenesis imperfecta" means imperfect bone formation. People with this condition have bones that break (fracture) easily, often from mild trauma or with no apparent cause. Multiple fractures are common, and in severe cases, can occur even before birth. Milder cases may involve only a few fractures over a person's lifetime.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/osteogenesis-imperfecta

Clinical features

From HPO
Pes planus
MedGen UID:
42034
Concept ID:
C0016202
Anatomical Abnormality
A foot where the longitudinal arch of the foot is in contact with the ground or floor when the individual is standing; or, in a patient lying supine, a foot where the arch is in contact with the surface of a flat board pressed against the sole of the foot by the examiner with a pressure similar to that expected from weight bearing; or, the height of the arch is reduced.
Limited pronation/supination of forearm
MedGen UID:
348328
Concept ID:
C1861331
Finding
A limitation of the ability to place the forearm in a position such that the palm faces anteriorly (supination) and to place the forearm in a position such that the palm faces posteriorly (pronation).
Anterior radial head dislocation
MedGen UID:
393155
Concept ID:
C2674451
Finding
A dislocation of the head of the radius from its socket in the elbow joint in an anterior direction.
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Dentinogenesis imperfecta
MedGen UID:
8313
Concept ID:
C0011436
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental dysplasia of dentin.
Recurrent fractures
MedGen UID:
42094
Concept ID:
C0016655
Injury or Poisoning
The repeated occurrence of bone fractures (implying an abnormally increased tendency for fracture).
Osteopenia
MedGen UID:
18222
Concept ID:
C0029453
Disease or Syndrome
Osteopenia is a term to define bone density that is not normal but also not as low as osteoporosis. By definition from the World Health Organization osteopenia is defined by bone densitometry as a T score -1 to -2.5.
Vertebral wedging
MedGen UID:
120495
Concept ID:
C0264112
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormal shape of the vertebral bodies whereby the vertebral bodies are thick on one side and taper to a thin edge at the other.
Hyperextensibility of the finger joints
MedGen UID:
334982
Concept ID:
C1844577
Finding
The ability of the finger joints to move beyond their normal range of motion.
Platyspondyly
MedGen UID:
335010
Concept ID:
C1844704
Finding
A flattened vertebral body shape with reduced distance between the vertebral endplates.
Joint hypermobility
MedGen UID:
336793
Concept ID:
C1844820
Finding
The ability of a joint to move beyond its normal range of motion.
Biconcave vertebral bodies
MedGen UID:
383834
Concept ID:
C1856087
Finding
Exaggerated concavity of the anterior or posterior surface of the vertebral body, i.e., the upper and lower vertebral endplates are hollowed inward.
Wormian bones
MedGen UID:
766814
Concept ID:
C3553900
Congenital Abnormality
The presence of extra bones within a cranial suture. Wormian bones are irregular isolated bones which appear in addition to the usual centers of ossification of the cranium.
Abnormal pelvic girdle bone morphology
MedGen UID:
866545
Concept ID:
C4020847
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormality of the bony pelvic girdle, which is a ring of bones connecting the vertebral column to the femurs.
Hyperplastic callus formation
MedGen UID:
868157
Concept ID:
C4022548
Anatomical Abnormality
Increased growth of callus, the bony and cartilaginous material that forms a connecting bridge across a bone fracture during fracture healing.
Hyperextensibility at elbow
MedGen UID:
869381
Concept ID:
C4023808
Anatomical Abnormality
The ability of the elbow joint to move beyond its normal range of motion.
Triangular face
MedGen UID:
324383
Concept ID:
C1835884
Finding
Facial contour, as viewed from the front, triangular in shape, with breadth at the temples and tapering to a narrow chin.
Blue sclerae
MedGen UID:
154236
Concept ID:
C0542514
Finding
An abnormal bluish coloration of the sclera.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Goudriaan WA, Harsevoort GJ, van Leeuwen M, Franken AA, Janus GJM
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg 2020 Feb;46(1):165-171. Epub 2018 Sep 22 doi: 10.1007/s00068-018-1005-9. PMID: 30244374Free PMC Article
Zhang Z, Li M, He JW, Fu WZ, Zhang CQ, Zhang ZL
PLoS One 2013;8(8):e72337. Epub 2013 Aug 20 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0072337. PMID: 23977282Free PMC Article
Balasubramanian M, Parker MJ, Dalton A, Giunta C, Lindert U, Peres LC, Wagner BE, Arundel P, Offiah A, Bishop NJ
Clin Dysmorphol 2013 Jul;22(3):93-101. doi: 10.1097/MCD.0b013e32836032f0. PMID: 23612438

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