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Lewy bodies

MedGen UID:
43126
Concept ID:
C0085200
Cell Component
Synonyms: Lewy Bodies; Lewy Body
SNOMED CT: Lewy bodies (43127003); Lewy body (43127003)
 
HPO: HP:0100315

Definition

Intracytoplasmic, eosinophilic, round to elongated inclusions found in vacuoles of injured or fragmented neurons. The presence of Lewy bodies is the histological marker of the degenerative changes in LEWY BODY DISEASE and PARKINSON DISEASE but they may be seen in other neurological conditions. They are typically found in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but they are also seen in the basal forebrain, hypothalamic nuclei, and neocortex. [from MeSH]

Conditions with this feature

Lewy body dementia
MedGen UID:
199874
Concept ID:
C0752347
Disease or Syndrome
Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by dementia and parkinsonism, often with fluctuating cognitive function, visual hallucinations, falls, syncopal episodes, and sensitivity to neuroleptic medication. Pathologically, Lewy bodies are present in a pattern more widespread than usually observed in Parkinson disease (see PD; 168600). Alzheimer disease (AD; 104300)-associated pathology and spongiform changes may also be seen (McKeith et al., 1996; Mizutani, 2000; McKeith et al., 2005).
Early-onset parkinsonism-intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
208674
Concept ID:
C0796195
Disease or Syndrome
Waisman syndrome is an X-linked neurologic disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, impaired intellectual development, and early-onset Parkinson disease (summary by Wilson et al., 2014).
GRN-related frontotemporal lobar degeneration with Tdp43 inclusions
MedGen UID:
375285
Concept ID:
C1843792
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of GRN frontotemporal dementia (GRN-FTD) includes the behavioral variant (bvFTD), primary progressive aphasia (PPA; further subcategorized as progressive nonfluent aphasia [PNFA] and semantic dementia [SD]), and movement disorders with extrapyramidal features such as parkinsonism and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). A broad range of clinical features both within and between families is observed. The age of onset ranges from 35 to 87 years. Behavioral disturbances are the most common early feature, followed by progressive aphasia. Impairment in executive function manifests as loss of judgment and insight. In early stages, PPA often manifests as deficits in naming, word finding, or word comprehension. In late stages, affected individuals often become mute and lose their ability to communicate. Early findings of parkinsonism include rigidity, bradykinesia or akinesia (slowing or absence of movements), limb dystonia, apraxia (loss of ability to carry out learned purposeful movements), and disequilibrium. Late motor findings may include myoclonus, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Most affected individuals eventually lose the ability to walk. Disease duration is three to 12 years.
Autosomal dominant Parkinson disease 8
MedGen UID:
339628
Concept ID:
C1846862
Disease or Syndrome
LRRK2 Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by features consistent with idiopathic PD: initial motor features of slowly progressive asymmetric tremor at rest and/or bradykinesia, cogwheel muscle rigidity, postural instability, and gait abnormalities that may include festination and freezing. Certain nonmotor symptoms in LRRK2-PD, especially REM sleep behavior disorder and cognitive decline, may occur at similar or slightly reduced frequency compared to typical idiopathic* PD. Onset is generally after age 50, although early-onset (in the 20s) and late-onset (in the 90s) disease has been described. * Idiopathic PD refers to the presence of signs and symptoms of PD for which the etiology is currently unknown and in which there is no known family history of PD.
Autosomal dominant Parkinson disease 4
MedGen UID:
381361
Concept ID:
C1854182
Disease or Syndrome
Often the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.\n\nParkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.\n\nParkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nGenerally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 2B
MedGen UID:
346658
Concept ID:
C1857747
Disease or Syndrome
PLA2G6-associated neurodegeneration (PLAN) comprises a continuum of three phenotypes with overlapping clinical and radiologic features: Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD). Atypical neuroaxonal dystrophy (atypical NAD). PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism. INAD usually begins between ages six months and three years with psychomotor regression or delay, hypotonia, and progressive spastic tetraparesis. Many affected children never learn to walk or lose the ability shortly after attaining it. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Disease progression is rapid, resulting in severe spasticity, progressive cognitive decline, and visual impairment. Many affected children do not survive beyond their first decade. Atypical NAD shows more phenotypic variability than INAD. In general, onset is in early childhood but can be as late as the end of the second decade. The presenting signs may be gait instability, ataxia, or speech delay and autistic features, which are sometimes the only evidence of disease for a year or more. Strabismus, nystagmus, and optic atrophy are common. Neuropsychiatric disturbances including impulsivity, poor attention span, hyperactivity, and emotional lability are also common. The course is fairly stable during early childhood and resembles static encephalopathy but is followed by neurologic deterioration between ages seven and 12 years. PLA2G6-related dystonia-parkinsonism has a variable age of onset, but most individuals present in early adulthood with gait disturbance or neuropsychiatric changes. Affected individuals consistently develop dystonia and parkinsonism (which may be accompanied by rapid cognitive decline) in their late teens to early twenties. Dystonia is most common in the hands and feet but may be more generalized. The most common features of parkinsonism in these individuals are bradykinesia, resting tremor, rigidity, and postural instability.
Autosomal dominant Parkinson disease 1
MedGen UID:
357008
Concept ID:
C1868595
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease is the second most common neurogenic disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD; 104300), affecting approximately 1% of the population over age 50. Clinical manifestations include resting tremor, muscular rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability. Additional features are characteristic postural abnormalities, dysautonomia, dystonic cramps, and dementia (Polymeropoulos et al., 1996). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see 168600.
Parkinson disease, late-onset
MedGen UID:
463618
Concept ID:
C3160718
Disease or Syndrome
Generally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.\n\nParkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.\n\nParkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement.\n\nOften the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.
Parkinson disease 18, autosomal dominant, susceptibility to
MedGen UID:
481901
Concept ID:
C3280271
Finding
Parkinson disease-18 is an autosomal dominant, adult-onset form of the disorder. It is phenotypically similar to idiopathic Parkinson disease (summary by Chartier-Harlin et al., 2011). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease (PD), see 168600.
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 4
MedGen UID:
482001
Concept ID:
C3280371
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN) is characterized initially by gait changes followed by progressive spastic paresis, progressive dystonia (which may be limited to the hands and feet or more generalized), neuropsychiatric abnormalities (emotional lability, depression, anxiety, impulsivity, compulsions, hallucinations, perseveration, inattention, and hyperactivity), and cognitive decline. Additional early findings can include dysphagia, dysarthria, optic atrophy, axonal neuropathy, parkinsonism, and bowel/bladder incontinence. Survival is usually well into adulthood. End-stage disease is characterized by severe dementia, spasticity, dystonia, and parkinsonism.
Autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson disease 23
MedGen UID:
896607
Concept ID:
C4225186
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease-23 is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by young-adult onset of parkinsonism associated with progressive cognitive impairment leading to dementia and dysautonomia. Some individuals have additional motor abnormalities. Affected individuals become severely disabled within a few decades (summary by Lesage et al., 2016).
Parkinson disease 21
MedGen UID:
903105
Concept ID:
C4225353
Disease or Syndrome
Parkinson disease-21 (PARK21) is an autosomal dominant form of typical adult-onset Parkinson disease characterized by tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability, and good response to levodopa treatment (summary by Vilarino-Guell et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Parkinson disease, see PD (168600).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 26 with or without frontotemporal dementia
MedGen UID:
1771903
Concept ID:
C5436882
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-26 with or without frontotemporal dementia (ALS26) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by adult onset of upper and low motor neuron disease causing bulbar dysfunction and limb weakness (ALS). Patients may also develop frontotemporal dementia (FTD) manifest as primary progressive aphasia, memory impairment, executive dysfunction, and behavioral or personality changes. Although patients may present with 1 or the other diseases, all eventually develop ALS. Neuropathologic studies of the brain and spinal cord show TDP43 (605078)-immunoreactive cytoplasmic inclusions that correlate with clinical features and Lewy body-like cytoplasmic inclusions in lower motor neurons (summary by Mackenzie et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, see ALS1 (105400).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Taylor JP, McKeith IG, Burn DJ, Boeve BF, Weintraub D, Bamford C, Allan LM, Thomas AJ, O'Brien JT
Lancet Neurol 2020 Feb;19(2):157-169. Epub 2019 Sep 10 doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(19)30153-X. PMID: 31519472Free PMC Article
McKeith IG, Boeve BF, Dickson DW, Halliday G, Taylor JP, Weintraub D, Aarsland D, Galvin J, Attems J, Ballard CG, Bayston A, Beach TG, Blanc F, Bohnen N, Bonanni L, Bras J, Brundin P, Burn D, Chen-Plotkin A, Duda JE, El-Agnaf O, Feldman H, Ferman TJ, Ffytche D, Fujishiro H, Galasko D, Goldman JG, Gomperts SN, Graff-Radford NR, Honig LS, Iranzo A, Kantarci K, Kaufer D, Kukull W, Lee VMY, Leverenz JB, Lewis S, Lippa C, Lunde A, Masellis M, Masliah E, McLean P, Mollenhauer B, Montine TJ, Moreno E, Mori E, Murray M, O'Brien JT, Orimo S, Postuma RB, Ramaswamy S, Ross OA, Salmon DP, Singleton A, Taylor A, Thomas A, Tiraboschi P, Toledo JB, Trojanowski JQ, Tsuang D, Walker Z, Yamada M, Kosaka K
Neurology 2017 Jul 4;89(1):88-100. Epub 2017 Jun 7 doi: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004058. PMID: 28592453Free PMC Article
Levin J, Kurz A, Arzberger T, Giese A, Höglinger GU
Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016 Feb 5;113(5):61-9. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2016.0061. PMID: 26900156Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Elder GJ, Lazar AS, Alfonso-Miller P, Taylor JP
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 2022 Oct;37(10) doi: 10.1002/gps.5814. PMID: 36168299Free PMC Article
Maski K, Trotti LM, Kotagal S, Robert Auger R, Rowley JA, Hashmi SD, Watson NF
J Clin Sleep Med 2021 Sep 1;17(9):1881-1893. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.9328. PMID: 34743789Free PMC Article
McShane R, Westby MJ, Roberts E, Minakaran N, Schneider L, Farrimond LE, Maayan N, Ware J, Debarros J
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2019 Mar 20;3(3):CD003154. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD003154.pub6. PMID: 30891742Free PMC Article
Connors MH, Quinto L, McKeith I, Brodaty H, Allan L, Bamford C, Thomas A, Taylor JP, O'Brien JT
Psychol Med 2018 Aug;48(11):1749-1758. Epub 2017 Nov 16 doi: 10.1017/S0033291717003257. PMID: 29143692Free PMC Article
Stinton C, McKeith I, Taylor JP, Lafortune L, Mioshi E, Mak E, Cambridge V, Mason J, Thomas A, O'Brien JT
Am J Psychiatry 2015 Aug 1;172(8):731-42. Epub 2015 Jun 18 doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2015.14121582. PMID: 26085043

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