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Photophobia

MedGen UID:
43220
Concept ID:
C0085636
Sign or Symptom
Synonyms: Light Sensitivities; Light Sensitivity; Photophobias; Sensitivities, Light; Sensitivity, Light
SNOMED CT: Photophobia (409668002); Light affects eyes (246622003); Does not like light (246622003); Eyes sensitive to light (246622003)
 
HPO: HP:0000613

Definition

Excessive sensitivity to light with the sensation of discomfort or pain in the eyes due to exposure to bright light. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVPhotophobia

Conditions with this feature

Chédiak-Higashi syndrome
MedGen UID:
3347
Concept ID:
C0007965
Disease or Syndrome
Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is characterized by partial oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, and a mild bleeding tendency. Approximately 85% of affected individuals develop the accelerated phase, or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, a life-threatening, hyperinflammatory condition. All affected individuals including adolescents and adults with atypical CHS and children with classic CHS who have successfully undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) develop neurologic findings during early adulthood.
Sjögren-Larsson syndrome
MedGen UID:
11443
Concept ID:
C0037231
Disease or Syndrome
Sjogren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is an autosomal recessive, early childhood-onset disorder characterized by ichthyosis, impaired intellectual development, spastic paraparesis, macular dystrophy, and leukoencephalopathy. It is caused by deficiency of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (summary by Lossos et al., 2006).
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 7
MedGen UID:
43108
Concept ID:
C0085132
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS7) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by the inability to degrade glucuronic acid-containing glycosaminoglycans. The phenotype is highly variable, ranging from severe lethal hydrops fetalis to mild forms with survival into adulthood. Most patients with the intermediate phenotype show hepatomegaly, skeletal anomalies, coarse facies, and variable degrees of mental impairment (Shipley et al., 1993). MPS VII was the first autosomal mucopolysaccharidosis for which chromosomal assignment was achieved.
Hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
56416
Concept ID:
C0162361
Disease or Syndrome
Hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia 2, or Clouston syndrome (referred to as HED2 throughout this GeneReview) is characterized by a triad of major clinical features including partial-to-complete alopecia, nail dystrophy, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. Sweating is preserved and there are usually no dental anomalies. Sparse scalp hair and dysplastic nails are seen early in life. In infancy, scalp hair is fine, sparse, and brittle. Progressive hair loss may lead to total alopecia by puberty. The nails may be milky white in early childhood; they gradually become dystrophic, thick, and distally separated from the nail bed. Palmoplantar keratoderma may develop during childhood and increases in severity with age. Associated features may include cutaneous hyperpigmentation (particularly over the joints) and finger clubbing. The clinical manifestations are highly variable even within the same family.
Mucolipidosis type IV
MedGen UID:
68663
Concept ID:
C0238286
Disease or Syndrome
Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) is an ultra-rare lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe psychomotor delay, progressive visual impairment, and achlorhydria. Individuals with MLIV typically present by the end of the first year of life with delayed developmental milestones (due to a developmental brain abnormality) and impaired vision (resulting from a combination of corneal clouding and retinal degeneration). By adolescence, all individuals with MLIV have severe visual impairment. A neurodegenerative component of MLIV has become more widely appreciated, with the majority of individuals demonstrating progressive spastic quadriparesis and loss of psychomotor skills starting in the second decade of life. About 5% of individuals have atypical MLIV, manifesting with less severe psychomotor impairment, but still exhibiting progressive retinal degeneration and achlorhydria.
Autosomal dominant keratitis-ichthyosis-hearing loss syndrome
MedGen UID:
120536
Concept ID:
C0265336
Disease or Syndrome
Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare ectodermal dysplasia characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, photophobia and corneal vascularization, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, erythrokeratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, and recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. A subset of patients with KID may develop multiple cystic pilar tumors, which are prone to malignant transformation and metastasis (Nyquist et al., 2007). Vohwinkel syndrome (124500) is an allelic disorder involving congenital deafness with keratopachydermia and constrictions of fingers and toes. Another similar disorder caused by mutation in GJB2 is palmoplantar keratoderma with deafness (148350). Genetic Heterogeneity of Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness Syndrome An autosomal recessive form of KID syndrome (KIDAR; 242150) is caused by mutation in the AP1B1 gene (600157) on chromosome 22q12.
Distichiasis-lymphedema syndrome
MedGen UID:
75566
Concept ID:
C0265345
Disease or Syndrome
Lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (referred to as LDS in this GeneReview) is characterized by lower-limb lymphedema, and distichiasis (aberrant eyelashes ranging from a full set of extra eyelashes to a single hair). Lymphedema typically appears in late childhood or puberty, is confined to the lower limbs with or without involvement of the external genitalia, and is often asymmetric; severity varies within families. Males develop edema at an earlier age and have more problems with cellulitis than females. Distichiasis, which may be present at birth, is observed in 94% of affected individuals. About 75% of affected individuals have ocular findings including corneal irritation, recurrent conjunctivitis, and photophobia; other common findings include varicose veins and ptosis.
Hereditary benign intraepithelial dyskeratosis
MedGen UID:
75588
Concept ID:
C0265966
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary benign intraepithelial dyskeratosis (HBID) is a rare inherited disease characterized by elevated plaques on the ocular and oral mucous membranes. The bulbar conjunctiva is involved, especially in the nasal and temporal perilimbal region. Dilated superficial vessels in association with the conjunctival plaques give the eye an overall red appearance, which accounts for the disease's nickname of 'red eye.' Morphologically, the lesions consist of a dyskeratotic hyperplastic epithelium. The oral lesions, which are typically asymptomatic and may go unrecognized, usually appear as thick, soft, white papules and plaques of various sizes, involving any part of the oral cavity. The ocular manifestations in this condition vary in severity from asymptomatic plaques on the bulbar conjunctiva to complete involvement of the cornea with severe vision loss. Patients commonly complain of symptoms of irritation, such as erythema, itching, excessive lacrimation, and photophobia. Periods of acute intensification of symptoms are common, especially in the spring. The lesions may become apparent in early infancy and may date from birth. The plaques persist throughout life and sometimes progress, but may wax and wane (summary by Witkop et al., 1960; Reed et al., 1979; and Baroni et al., 2009).
Xeroderma pigmentosum, group D
MedGen UID:
75656
Concept ID:
C0268138
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Alstrom syndrome
MedGen UID:
78675
Concept ID:
C0268425
Disease or Syndrome
Alström syndrome is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, obesity, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, acute infantile-onset cardiomyopathy and/or adolescent- or adult-onset restrictive cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance / type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and chronic progressive kidney disease. Cone-rod dystrophy presents as progressive visual impairment, photophobia, and nystagmus usually starting between birth and age 15 months. Many individuals lose all perception of light by the end of the second decade, but a minority retain the ability to read large print into the third decade. Children usually have normal birth weight but develop truncal obesity during their first year. Sensorineural hearing loss presents in the first decade in as many as 70% of individuals and may progress to the severe or moderately severe range (40-70 db) by the end of the first to second decade. Insulin resistance is typically accompanied by the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans, and proceeds to T2DM in the majority by the third decade. Nearly all demonstrate hypertriglyceridemia. Other findings can include endocrine abnormalities (hypothyroidism, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in males, and hyperandrogenism in females), urologic dysfunction / detrusor instability, progressive decrease in renal function, and hepatic disease (ranging from elevated transaminases to steatohepatitis/NAFLD). Approximately 20% of affected individuals have delay in early developmental milestones, most commonly in gross and fine motor skills. About 30% have a learning disability. Cognitive impairment (IQ <70) is very rare. Wide clinical variability is observed among affected individuals, even within the same family.
Juvenile nephropathic cystinosis
MedGen UID:
75701
Concept ID:
C0268626
Congenital Abnormality
Cystinosis comprises three allelic phenotypes: Nephropathic cystinosis in untreated children is characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome, poor growth, hypophosphatemic/calcipenic rickets, impaired glomerular function resulting in complete glomerular failure, and accumulation of cystine in almost all cells, leading to cellular dysfunction with tissue and organ impairment. The typical untreated child has short stature, rickets, and photophobia. Failure to thrive is generally noticed after approximately age six months; signs of renal tubular Fanconi syndrome (polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and acidosis) appear as early as age six months; corneal crystals can be present before age one year and are always present after age 16 months. Prior to the use of renal transplantation and cystine-depleting therapy, the life span in nephropathic cystinosis was no longer than ten years. With these interventions, affected individuals can survive at least into the mid-forties or fifties with satisfactory quality of life. Intermediate cystinosis is characterized by all the typical manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis, but onset is at a later age. Renal glomerular failure occurs in all untreated affected individuals, usually between ages 15 and 25 years. The non-nephropathic (ocular) form of cystinosis is characterized clinically only by photophobia resulting from corneal cystine crystal accumulation.
Lattice corneal dystrophy Type III
MedGen UID:
90939
Concept ID:
C0339273
Disease or Syndrome
Gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe corneal amyloidosis leading to blindness. Clinical manifestations, which appear in the first decade of life, include blurred vision, photophobia, and foreign-body sensation. By the third decade, raised, yellowish-gray, gelatinous masses severely impair visual acuity, and lamellar keratoplasty is required for most patients (summary by Tsujikawa et al., 1999).
Reis-Bucklers corneal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
83284
Concept ID:
C0339278
Disease or Syndrome
Reis-Bucklers corneal dystrophy (CDRB) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the superficial corneal stroma that manifests as recurrent corneal erosions in early childhood. Affected individuals develop corneal opacities that result in significant visual impairment. Microscopically, CDRB may be differentiated from other forms of corneal dystrophy by confluent opacities in the Bowman layer and subepithelium, which are the product of extracellular bodies that stain red with Masson trichrome stain and appear as crystalloid rod-shaped bodies on transmission electron microscopy (summary by Tanhehco et al., 2006).
Cone monochromatism
MedGen UID:
87386
Concept ID:
C0339537
Congenital Abnormality
Blue cone (OPN1SW; 613522) monochromatism is a rare X-linked congenital stationary cone dysfunction syndrome characterized by the absence of functional long wavelength-sensitive and medium wavelength-sensitive cones in the retina. Color discrimination is severely impaired from birth, and vision is derived from the remaining preserved blue (S) cones and rod photoreceptors. BCM typically presents with reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, and photophobia. Patients often have myopia (review by Gardner et al., 2009). There is evidence for progression of disease in some BCM families (Nathans et al., 1989; Ayyagari et al., 2000; Michaelides et al., 2005).
Ocular albinism, type I
MedGen UID:
90991
Concept ID:
C0342684
Disease or Syndrome
Ocular albinism type I (OA1) is the most common form of ocular albinism. Clinical presentation of OA1 in Caucasians is characterized by nystagmus, impaired visual acuity, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, macular hypoplasia, and normally pigmented skin and hair. Carrier females usually have punctate iris translucency and a mottled pattern of fundus pigmentation. In contrast to Caucasian patients, black or Japanese patients with OA1 often have brown irides with little or no translucency and varying degrees of fundus hypopigmentation, the so-called 'nonalbinotic fundus' (summary by Xiao and Zhang, 2009).
GAPO syndrome
MedGen UID:
98034
Concept ID:
C0406723
Disease or Syndrome
GAPO syndrome is the acronymic designation for a complex of growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia (failure of tooth eruption), and progressive optic atrophy (Tipton and Gorlin, 1984). Ilker et al. (1999) and Bayram et al. (2014) noted that optic atrophy is not a consistent feature of the disorder.
Retinal arterial tortuosity
MedGen UID:
140840
Concept ID:
C0423401
Finding
Familial retinal arterial tortuosity is characterized by marked tortuosity of second- and third-order retinal arteries with normal first-order arteries and venous system. Two-thirds of patients experience variable degrees of symptomatic transient vision loss due to retinal hemorrhage following minor stress or trauma (summary by Nischler et al., 2011).
Chiari type I malformation
MedGen UID:
196689
Concept ID:
C0750929
Congenital Abnormality
Arnold-Chiari type I malformation refers to a relatively mild degree of herniation of the posteroinferior region of the cerebellum (the cerebellar tonsils) into the cervical canal with little or no displacement of the fourth ventricle. It is characterized by one or both pointed (not rounded) cerebellar tonsils that project 5 mm below the foramen magnum, measured by a line drawn from the basion to the opisthion (McRae Line)
Deafness dystonia syndrome
MedGen UID:
162903
Concept ID:
C0796074
Disease or Syndrome
Males with deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy (DDON) syndrome have prelingual or postlingual sensorineural hearing impairment in early childhood, slowly progressive dystonia or ataxia in the teens, slowly progressive decreased visual acuity from optic atrophy beginning at approximately age 20 years, and dementia beginning at approximately age 40 years. Psychiatric symptoms such as personality change and paranoia may appear in childhood and progress. The hearing impairment appears to be consistent in age of onset and progression, whereas the neurologic, visual, and neuropsychiatric signs vary in degree of severity and rate of progression. Females may have mild hearing impairment and focal dystonia.
Odonto-onycho-dermal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
208666
Concept ID:
C0796093
Disease or Syndrome
Odontoonychodermal dysplasia (OODD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dry hair, severe hypodontia, smooth tongue with marked reduction of fungiform and filiform papillae, onychodysplasia, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, hypo- and hyperhidrosis of the skin, and atrophic patches on the face (summary by Adaimy et al., 2007; Yu et al., 2019).
Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia
MedGen UID:
220887
Concept ID:
C1274795
Congenital Abnormality
Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by onset in infancy of a panepithelial defect involving the oral, nasal, conjunctival, vaginal, cervical, perineal, urethral, and bladder mucosa. Patients develop cataracts, blindness, nonscarring alopecia, perineal psoriasiform lesions, and follicular keratoses (Witkop et al., 1982). Although 1 family was reported to have progressive severe interstitial lung disease (Witkop et al., 1979), this feature has not been reported in other families and is not considered a criterion for diagnosis. However, the clinical triad of nonscarring alopecia, well-demarcated fiery red mucosa, and psoriasiform perineal involvement has been consistently observed (review by Boralevi et al., 2005).
Autosomal recessive keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
224809
Concept ID:
C1275089
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome (KIDAR) is characterized by neonatal-onset ichthyotic erythroderma and profound sensorineural deafness, with failure to thrive and developmental delay in childhood. Severe corneal scarring with vision loss has been observed in adulthood. Low plasma copper and ceruloplasmin levels have been reported in some patients (Alsaif et al., 2019; Boyden et al., 2019). An autosomal dominant form of KID syndrome (KIDAD; 148210) is caused by mutation in the GJB2 gene (121011) on chromosome 13q12. Mutation in the AP1S1 gene (603531) causes a disorder with overlapping features (MEDNIK; 609313).
Retinitis pigmentosa 23
MedGen UID:
238456
Concept ID:
C1419610
Disease or Syndrome
Any retinitis pigmentosa in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the OFD1 gene.
Fleck corneal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
287065
Concept ID:
C1562113
Disease or Syndrome
Fleck corneal dystrophy (CFD) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by numerous tiny, dot-like white flecks scattered in all layers of the corneal stroma. Typically, the stroma located in between the flecks is clear, and the endothelium, the epithelium, Bowman layer, and Descemet membrane are normal. Patients are usually asymptomatic with normal vision, yet a small number of patients report the sensation of a minor photophobia. The flecks in CFD can appear as early as 2 years of age, or sometimes even at birth, and appear not to progress significantly throughout life. Histologically, the corneal flecks appear to correspond to abnormal keratocytes swollen with membrane-limited intracytoplasmic vesicles containing complex lipids and glycosaminoglycans (summary by Kawasaki et al., 2012).
Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
287070
Concept ID:
C1562894
Disease or Syndrome
Thiel-Behnke corneal dystrophy (CDTB) is characterized by progressive honeycomb-like, subepithelial corneal opacities with recurrent erosions (Thiel and Behnke, 1967).
Macular corneal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
351514
Concept ID:
C1636149
Disease or Syndrome
Macular corneal dystrophy (MCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which progressive punctate opacities in the cornea result in bilateral loss of vision, eventually necessitating corneal transplantation. MCD is classified into 2 subtypes, type I and type II, defined by the respective absence and presence of sulfated keratan sulfate in the patient serum, although both types have clinically indistinguishable phenotypes (summary by Akama et al., 2000).
Cone-rod dystrophy 5
MedGen UID:
322083
Concept ID:
C1832976
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy-5 (CORD5) is characterized by reduced visual acuity, photophobia, and defective color vision. Most patients experience onset of symptoms in early childhood, with progression to legal blindness by early adulthood, although some patients exhibit a milder phenotype, with onset in the fourth or fifth decade of life (Kohn et al., 2007; Reinis et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cone-rod dystrophy, see 120970.
Retinitis pigmentosa 17
MedGen UID:
322153
Concept ID:
C1833245
Disease or Syndrome
Retinitis pigmentosa-17 (RP17) is characterized by relatively mild disease, with decreased visual acuity, visual field constriction, nyctalopia, and slow progression. Many affected individuals have preserved central vision and acuity until the sixth or seventh decades of life (de Bruijn et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of retinitis pigmentosa, see 268000.
Tooth agenesis, selective, 4
MedGen UID:
372057
Concept ID:
C1835492
Disease or Syndrome
Any tooth agenesis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the WNT10A gene.
Keratitis fugax hereditaria
MedGen UID:
372107
Concept ID:
C1835697
Disease or Syndrome
Keratoendotheliitis fugax hereditaria (KEFH) is an autosomal dominant corneal disease that periodically and fleetingly affects the corneal endothelium, stroma, and vision, eventually resulting in central corneal stromal opacities in some patients. The disease is characterized by episodes of unilateral ocular pain, pericorneal injection, and photophobia. The acute symptoms vanish in 1 to 2 days, but vision remains blurry for several weeks. Onset occurs between ages 3 and 12 years, and may involve either eye. Episodes generally decrease in frequency and become more mild with age (summary by Turunen et al., 2018).
Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 11
MedGen UID:
332073
Concept ID:
C1835851
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of keratinization characterized primarily by abnormal skin scaling over the whole body. These disorders are limited to skin, with approximately two-thirds of patients presenting severe symptoms. The main skin phenotypes are lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE), although phenotypic overlap within the same patient or among patients from the same family can occur (summary by Fischer, 2009). Neither histopathologic findings nor ultrastructural features clearly distinguish between NCIE and LI. In addition, mutations in several genes have been shown to cause both lamellar and nonbullous ichthyosiform erythrodermal phenotypes (Akiyama et al., 2003). At the First Ichthyosis Consensus Conference in Soreze in 2009, the term 'autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis' (ARCI) was designated to encompass LI, NCIE, and harlequin ichthyosis (ARCI4B; 242500) (Oji et al., 2010). NCIE is characterized by prominent erythroderma and fine white, superficial, semiadherent scales. Most patients present with collodion membrane at birth and have palmoplantar keratoderma, often with painful fissures, digital contractures, and loss of pulp volume. In half of the cases, a nail dystrophy including ridging, subungual hyperkeratosis, or hypoplasia has been described. Ectropion, eclabium, scalp involvement, and loss of eyebrows and lashes seem to be more frequent in NCIE than in lamellar ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2000). In LI, the scales are large, adherent, dark, and pigmented with no skin erythema. Overlapping phenotypes may depend on the age of the patient and the region of the body. The terminal differentiation of the epidermis is perturbed in both forms, leading to reduced barrier function and defects of lipid composition in the stratum corneum (summary by Lefevre et al., 2006). In later life, the skin in ARCI may have scales that cover the entire body surface, including the flexural folds, and the scales are highly variable in size and color. Erythema may be very mild and almost invisible. Some affected persons exhibit scarring alopecia, and many have secondary anhidrosis (summary by Eckl et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, see ARCI1 (242300).
Cone-rod dystrophy 11
MedGen UID:
322767
Concept ID:
C1835865
Disease or Syndrome
The first signs and symptoms of cone-rod dystrophy, which often occur in childhood, are usually decreased sharpness of vision (visual acuity) and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). These features are typically followed by impaired color vision (dyschromatopsia), blind spots (scotomas) in the center of the visual field, and partial side (peripheral) vision loss. Over time, affected individuals develop night blindness and a worsening of their peripheral vision, which can limit independent mobility. Decreasing visual acuity makes reading increasingly difficult and most affected individuals are legally blind by mid-adulthood. As the condition progresses, individuals may develop involuntary eye movements (nystagmus).\n\nThere are more than 30 types of cone-rod dystrophy, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and their pattern of inheritance: autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linked. Additionally, cone-rod dystrophy can occur alone without any other signs and symptoms or it can occur as part of a syndrome that affects multiple parts of the body.\n\nCone-rod dystrophy is a group of related eye disorders that causes vision loss, which becomes more severe over time. These disorders affect the retina, which is the layer of light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. In people with cone-rod dystrophy, vision loss occurs as the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate.
Cone dystrophy with supernormal rod response
MedGen UID:
332081
Concept ID:
C1835897
Disease or Syndrome
Cone dystrophy with supernormal rod responses (CDSRR) is characterized by onset in the first or second decade of life of very marked photophobia, myopia, reduced color vision along the red-green axis with relatively preserved tritan discrimination, and central scotomata with peripheral widespread sensitivity loss predominating in the superior visual field. Nyctalopia is a later feature of the disorder. There is often retinal pigment epithelium disturbance at the macula with a normal retinal periphery. Autofluorescence (AF) imaging shows either a perifoveal ring or a central macular area of relative increased AF (summary by Michaelides et al., 2005).
Retinitis pigmentosa 32
MedGen UID:
322781
Concept ID:
C1835927
Disease or Syndrome
A retinitis pigmentosa that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 1p21.3-p13.3.
Supranuclear palsy, progressive, 2
MedGen UID:
324446
Concept ID:
C1836148
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis 9
MedGen UID:
325277
Concept ID:
C1837873
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset neurodegeneration in the human retina can lead to Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), the most severe human form of inherited photoreceptor-neuron degeneration resulting in congenital blindness, with an incidence of approximately 1 in 80,000 (summary by Koenekoop et al., 2012). NMNAT1 mutations have been observed to cause severe and rapidly progressive macular degeneration, leading to severe central atrophy with an appearance of congenital macular coloboma in the neonatal period, as well as an unusual early-onset atrophy of the optic nerve (Perrault et al., 2012). Some patients present with later onset and milder phenotype than typical LCA (Kumaran et al., 2021). For a general discussion of the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in Leber congenital amaurosis, see LCA1 (204000).
Achromatopsia 4
MedGen UID:
330669
Concept ID:
C1841721
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The manifestations are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
374912
Concept ID:
C1842362
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy
MedGen UID:
334280
Concept ID:
C1842914
Disease or Syndrome
Adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy, also known as adult vitelliform macular dystrophy, adult-type foveomacular dystrophy, adult vitelliform macular degeneration, pseudovitelliform macular degeneration, and adult-onset foveomacular pigment epithelial dystrophy, is characterized by a solitary, oval, slightly elevated yellowish subretinal lesion of the fovea that is similar in appearance to the vitelliform or egg-yolk stage of Best disease (153700). Initially the yellow lesion may be present in only one eye. The size is generally one-third to one disc diameter, and small yellow flecks are seen in the paracentral lesion. Patients usually become symptomatic in the fourth or fifth decade of life with a protracted decrease of visual acuity and mild metamorphopsia. Electrooculographic testing reveals a normal or only slightly reduced Arden ratio, which is intensely abnormal in Best disease. The prognosis is optimistic, as most patients retain reading vision throughout life (Felbor et al., 1997; Yamaguchi et al., 2001). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of vitelliform macular dystrophy, see VMD1 (153840).
Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 6
MedGen UID:
334829
Concept ID:
C1843765
Finding
Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 5
MedGen UID:
334831
Concept ID:
C1843771
Finding
For a phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of migraine headaches, see MGR1 (157300).
Migraine without aura, susceptibility to, 4
MedGen UID:
336040
Concept ID:
C1843773
Finding
An inherited susceptibility or predisposition to developing migraines without aura.
Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 3
MedGen UID:
375283
Concept ID:
C1843782
Finding
X-linked cone-rod dystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
336777
Concept ID:
C1844776
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked cone-rod dystrophy is a rare, progressive visual disorder primarily affecting cone photoreceptors (Demirci et al., 2002). Affected individuals, essentially all of whom are males, present with decreased visual acuity, myopia, photophobia, abnormal color vision, full peripheral visual fields, decreased photopic electroretinographic responses, and granularity of the macular retinal pigment epithelium. The degree of rod photoreceptor involvement is variable, with increasing degeneration. Although penetrance appears to be nearly 100%, there is variable expressivity with respect to age at onset, severity of symptoms, and findings (Hong et al., 1994). Genetic Heterogeneity of X-linked Cone-Rod Dystrophy Additional forms of X-linked cone-rod dystrophy include CORDX2 (300085), mapped to chromosome Xq27, and CORDX3 (300476), caused by mutation in the CACNA1F gene (300110) on chromosome Xp11.23. For a discussion of autosomal forms of cone-rod dystrophy, see CORD2 (120970).
X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder
MedGen UID:
336844
Concept ID:
C1845050
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder shows more severe manifestations in hemizygous males compared to heterozygous females. Affected males have early onset of recurrent respiratory infections and failure to thrive resulting from inflammatory gastroenteritis or colitis. Patients also show reticular pigmentation abnormalities of the skin and may develop corneal scarring. Carrier females may be unaffected or have only pigmentary abnormalities along the lines of Blaschko (summary by Starokadomskyy et al., 2016).
Ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness
MedGen UID:
337149
Concept ID:
C1845069
Congenital Abnormality
Ocular albinism is a genetic condition that primarily affects the eyes. This condition reduces the coloring (pigmentation) of the iris, which is the colored part of the eye, and the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. Pigmentation in the eye is essential for normal vision.\n\nOcular albinism is characterized by severely impaired sharpness of vision (visual acuity) and problems with combining vision from both eyes to perceive depth (stereoscopic vision). Although the vision loss is permanent, it does not worsen over time. Other eye abnormalities associated with this condition include rapid, involuntary eye movements (nystagmus); eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus); and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). Many affected individuals also have abnormalities involving the optic nerves, which carry visual information from the eye to the brain.\n\nUnlike some other forms of albinism, ocular albinism does not significantly affect the color of the skin and hair. People with this condition may have a somewhat lighter complexion than other members of their family, but these differences are usually minor.\n\nThe most common form of ocular albinism is known as the Nettleship-Falls type or type 1. Other forms of ocular albinism are much rarer and may be associated with additional signs and symptoms, such as hearing loss.
X-linked cone-rod dystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
336932
Concept ID:
C1845407
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal disorder with predominantly cone involvement. Rod impairment may occur at the same time as the cone impairment or appear later. Patients with CORD usually have reduced visual acuity, photophobia, and color vision defects (summary by Huang et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of X-linked cone-rod dystrophy, see 304020.
Retinitis pigmentosa 3
MedGen UID:
336999
Concept ID:
C1845667
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is a severe form of inherited retinal degeneration that primarily affects the rod photoreceptors (Demirci et al., 2002). It typically causes an early-onset night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, often causing patients to become legally blind by the age of 30 to 40 years. In RP3, affected males have a severe phenotype, and carrier females show a wide spectrum of clinical features ranging from completely asymptomatic to severe RP (Jin et al., 2007). Mutation in the RPGR gene is believed to account for approximately 70% of XLRP (Vervoort et al., 2000). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of retinitis pigmentosa, see 268000.
Cone-rod dystrophy 10
MedGen UID:
337598
Concept ID:
C1846529
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy-10 (CORD10) is characterized by progressive loss of visual acuity and color vision, followed by night blindness and loss of peripheral vision. Patients may experience photophobia and epiphora in bright light (Abid et al., 2006). Mutation in SEMA4A can also cause a form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP35; 610282). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cone-rod dystrophy, see 120970.
Oculocutaneous albinism type 1B
MedGen UID:
337712
Concept ID:
C1847024
Disease or Syndrome
Oculocutaneous albinism type I is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by absence of pigment in hair, skin, and eyes, and does not vary with race or age. Severe nystagmus, photophobia, and reduced visual acuity are common features. OCA type I is divided into 2 types: type IA, characterized by complete lack of tyrosinase activity due to production of an inactive enzyme, and type IB, characterized by reduced activity of tyrosinase. Although OCA caused by mutations in the TYR gene was classically known as 'tyrosinase-negative' OCA, Tripathi et al. (1992) noted that some patients with 'tyrosinase-positive' OCA may indeed have TYR mutations resulting in residual enzyme activity. These patients can be classified as having OCA1B.
Migraine, familial typical, susceptibility to, 2
MedGen UID:
341144
Concept ID:
C1848066
Finding
Xeroderma pigmentosum variant type
MedGen UID:
376352
Concept ID:
C1848410
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Xeroderma pigmentosum, group E
MedGen UID:
341219
Concept ID:
C1848411
Congenital Abnormality
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Red skin pigment anomaly of new guinea
MedGen UID:
341457
Concept ID:
C1849451
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia 3
MedGen UID:
340413
Concept ID:
C1849792
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The manifestations are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography.
Optic atrophy 6
MedGen UID:
338012
Concept ID:
C1850281
Disease or Syndrome
Giant axonal neuropathy 1
MedGen UID:
376775
Concept ID:
C1850386
Disease or Syndrome
GAN-related neurodegeneration comprises a phenotypic continuum ranging from severe (sometimes called classic giant axonal neuropathy) to milder pure early-onset peripheral motor and sensory neuropathies. The classic giant axonal neuropathy phenotype typically manifests as an infantile-onset neurodegenerative disorder, starting as a severe peripheral motor and sensory neuropathy and evolving into central nervous system impairment (intellectual disability, seizures, cerebellar signs, and pyramidal tract signs). Most affected individuals become wheelchair dependent in the second decade of life and eventually bedridden with severe polyneuropathy, ataxia, and dementia. Death usually occurs in the third decade. At the milder end of the spectrum are predominantly motor and sensory neuropathies (with little to no CNS involvement) that overlap with the axonal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies.
Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip-palate syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
343663
Concept ID:
C1851841
Disease or Syndrome
An EEC syndrome characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 7q11.2-q21.3.
Epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy
MedGen UID:
342263
Concept ID:
C1852551
Disease or Syndrome
Epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy (ERED) is characterized by frequent painful recurrent corneal erosions, with onset in the first decade of life and subsequent gradual decrease in frequency, with cessation in the third or fourth decade. Small gray anterior stromal flecks associated with larger focal gray-white disc-shaped, circular, or wreath-like lesions with central clarity, in the Bowman layer and immediately subjacent anterior stroma, varying from 0.2 to 1.5 mm in diameter, appear to be clinically diagnostic of ERED (Oliver et al., 2016).
Posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
343836
Concept ID:
C1852555
Disease or Syndrome
A posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy that has material basis in autosomal dominant inheritance of mutation in the OVOL2 gene on chromosome 20p11.23.
Cone-rod dystrophy 8
MedGen UID:
381360
Concept ID:
C1854180
Disease or Syndrome
A cone-rod dystrophy that has material basis in variation in the chromosome region 1q12-q24.
Leber congenital amaurosis 6
MedGen UID:
344245
Concept ID:
C1854260
Congenital Abnormality
Leber congenital amaurosis comprises a group of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies characterized by vision loss, nystagmus, and severe retinal dysfunction. Patients usually present at birth with profound vision loss and pendular nystagmus. Electroretinogram (ERG) responses are usually nonrecordable. Other clinical findings may include high hypermetropia, photodysphoria, oculodigital sign, keratoconus, cataracts, and a variable appearance to the fundus (summary by Chung and Traboulsi, 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCA, see 204000.
Amaurosis-hypertrichosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
341805
Concept ID:
C1857588
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, syndromic, inherited retinal disorder characterized by cone-rod type congenital amaurosis, severe retinal dystrophy leading to visual impairment and profound photophobia (without night blindness), and trichomegaly (bushy eyebrows with synophrys, excessive facial and body hair (including marked circumaleolar hypertrichosis). There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1989.
Achromatopsia 2
MedGen UID:
387867
Concept ID:
C1857618
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The manifestations are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography.
Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 11
MedGen UID:
387900
Concept ID:
C1857751
Finding
Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 10
MedGen UID:
341839
Concept ID:
C1857752
Finding
Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip-palate syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
347666
Concept ID:
C1858562
Disease or Syndrome
The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling.
Ataxia-hypogonadism-choroidal dystrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
347798
Concept ID:
C1859093
Disease or Syndrome
PNPLA6 disorders span a phenotypic continuum characterized by variable combinations of cerebellar ataxia; upper motor neuron involvement manifesting as spasticity and/or brisk reflexes; chorioretinal dystrophy associated with variable degrees of reduced visual function; and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (delayed puberty and lack of secondary sex characteristics). The hypogonadotropic hypogonadism occurs either in isolation or as part of anterior hypopituitarism (growth hormone, thyroid hormone, or gonadotropin deficiencies). Common but less frequent features are peripheral neuropathy (usually of axonal type manifesting as reduced distal reflexes, diminished vibratory sensation, and/or distal muscle wasting); hair anomalies (long eyelashes, bushy eyebrows, or scalp alopecia); short stature; and impaired cognitive functioning (learning disabilities in children; deficits in attention, visuospatial abilities, and recall in adults). Some of these features can occur in distinct clusters on the phenotypic continuum: Boucher-Neuhäuser syndrome (cerebellar ataxia, chorioretinal dystrophy, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism); Gordon Holmes syndrome (cerebellar ataxia, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and – to a variable degree – brisk reflexes); Oliver-McFarlane syndrome (trichomegaly, chorioretinal dystrophy, short stature, intellectual disability, and hypopituitarism); Laurence-Moon syndrome; and spastic paraplegia type 39 (SPG39) (upper motor neuron involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and sometimes reduced cognitive functioning and/or cerebellar ataxia).
Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type 3
MedGen UID:
349167
Concept ID:
C1859439
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis 2
MedGen UID:
348473
Concept ID:
C1859844
Disease or Syndrome
RPE65-related Leber congenital amaurosis / early-onset severe retinal dystrophy (RPE65-LCA/EOSRD) is a severe inherited retinal degeneration (IRD) with a typical presentation between birth and age five years. While central vision varies, the hallmark of this disorder is the presence of severe visual impairment with a deceptively preserved retinal structure. Vision is relatively stable in the first decade of life, but begins to decline in adolescence. Most affected individuals are legally blind (visual acuity 20/200 and/or visual fields extending <20 degrees from fixation) by age 20 years. After age 20 years, visual acuity declines further and by the fourth decade all affected individuals are legally blind and many have complete loss of vision (i.e., no light perception). Milder disease phenotypes have been described in individuals with hypomorphic alleles.
Retinitis pigmentosa 25
MedGen UID:
350427
Concept ID:
C1864446
Disease or Syndrome
Any retinitis pigmentosa in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the EYS gene.
Congenital stromal corneal dystrophy
MedGen UID:
400601
Concept ID:
C1864738
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital stromal corneal dystrophy is characterized by the presence of bilateral corneal opacities that can be seen at or shortly after birth. The surface of the cornea is normal or slightly irregular; small opacities are seen throughout the stroma of the entire cornea and give the cornea a cloudy appearance. Strabismus is common. Nystagmus is uncommon. Amblyopia can develop in children.
Retinal cone dystrophy 4
MedGen UID:
355308
Concept ID:
C1864849
Disease or Syndrome
Any cone dystrophy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CACNA2D4 gene.
Retinal cone dystrophy 3A
MedGen UID:
355864
Concept ID:
C1864900
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The manifestations are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography.
Ectodermal dysplasia, sensorineural hearing loss, and distinctive facial features
MedGen UID:
355878
Concept ID:
C1864966
Disease or Syndrome
Migraine, familial hemiplegic, 3
MedGen UID:
400655
Concept ID:
C1864987
Disease or Syndrome
Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including FHM) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech). FHM must include motor involvement, such as hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with CACNA1A-FHM have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia.
Cone dystrophy 3
MedGen UID:
356104
Concept ID:
C1865869
Disease or Syndrome
Progressive cone dystrophy usually presents in childhood or early adult life, with many patients developing rod photoreceptor involvement in later life, thereby leading to considerable overlap between progressive cone dystrophy and cone-rod dystrophy. Both progressive cone dystrophy and cone-rod dystrophy have been associated with mutation in the GUCA1A gene (Michaelides et al., 2006). Intrafamilial variability in GUCA1A-associated macular disease ranges from mild photoreceptor degeneration to central areolar choroidal dystrophy (CACD), a form of retinal degeneration that primarily involves the macula and is characterized by a well-defined atrophic region of retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris in the latest stage (Chen et al., 2017).
Cone-rod dystrophy 6
MedGen UID:
400963
Concept ID:
C1866293
Disease or Syndrome
The first signs and symptoms of cone-rod dystrophy, which often occur in childhood, are usually decreased sharpness of vision (visual acuity) and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). These features are typically followed by impaired color vision (dyschromatopsia), blind spots (scotomas) in the center of the visual field, and partial side (peripheral) vision loss. Over time, affected individuals develop night blindness and a worsening of their peripheral vision, which can limit independent mobility. Decreasing visual acuity makes reading increasingly difficult and most affected individuals are legally blind by mid-adulthood. As the condition progresses, individuals may develop involuntary eye movements (nystagmus).\n\nThere are more than 30 types of cone-rod dystrophy, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and their pattern of inheritance: autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linked. Additionally, cone-rod dystrophy can occur alone without any other signs and symptoms or it can occur as part of a syndrome that affects multiple parts of the body.\n\nCone-rod dystrophy is a group of related eye disorders that causes vision loss, which becomes more severe over time. These disorders affect the retina, which is the layer of light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. In people with cone-rod dystrophy, vision loss occurs as the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate.
Trichothiodystrophy 1, photosensitive
MedGen UID:
355730
Concept ID:
C1866504
Disease or Syndrome
About half of all people with trichothiodystrophy have a photosensitive form of the disorder, which causes them to be extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. They develop a severe sunburn after spending just a few minutes in the sun. However, for reasons that are unclear, they do not develop other sun-related problems such as excessive freckling of the skin or an increased risk of skin cancer. Many people with trichothiodystrophy report that they do not sweat.\n\nTrichothiodystrophy is also associated with recurrent infections, particularly respiratory infections, which can be life-threatening. People with trichothiodystrophy may have abnormal red blood cells, including red blood cells that are smaller than normal. They may also have elevated levels of a type of hemoglobin called A2, which is a protein found in red blood cells. Other features of trichothiodystrophy can include dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis); abnormalities of the fingernails and toenails; clouding of the lens in both eyes from birth (congenital cataracts); poor coordination; and skeletal abnormalities including degeneration of both hips at an early age.\n\nIntellectual disability and delayed development are common in people with trichothiodystrophy, although most affected individuals are highly social with an outgoing and engaging personality. Some people with trichothiodystrophy have brain abnormalities that can be seen with imaging tests. A common neurological feature of this disorder is impaired myelin production (dysmyelination). Myelin is a fatty substance that insulates nerve cells and promotes the rapid transmission of nerve impulses.\n\nMothers of children with trichothiodystrophy may experience problems during pregnancy including pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia) and a related condition called HELLP syndrome that can damage the liver. Babies with trichothiodystrophy are at increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, and slow growth. Most children with trichothiodystrophy have short stature compared to others their age. \n\nThe signs and symptoms of trichothiodystrophy vary widely. Mild cases may involve only the hair. More severe cases also cause delayed development, significant intellectual disability, and recurrent infections; severely affected individuals may survive only into infancy or early childhood.\n\nIn people with trichothiodystrophy, tests show that the hair is lacking sulfur-containing proteins that normally gives hair its strength. A cross section of a cut hair shows alternating light and dark banding that has been described as a "tiger tail."\n\nTrichothiodystrophy, commonly called TTD, is a rare inherited condition that affects many parts of the body. The hallmark of this condition is hair that is sparse and easily broken. 
Retinal cone dystrophy type 1
MedGen UID:
356747
Concept ID:
C1867326
Disease or Syndrome
Retinitis pigmentosa 37
MedGen UID:
410004
Concept ID:
C1970163
Disease or Syndrome
Any retinitis pigmentosa in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NR2E3 gene.
Isolated microphthalmia 5
MedGen UID:
410021
Concept ID:
C1970236
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia-retinitis pigmentosa-foveoschisis-optic disc drusen syndrome is a rare, genetic, non-syndromic developmental defect of the eye disorder characterized by the association of posterior microphthalmia, retinal dystrophy compatible with retinitis pigmentosa, localized foveal schisis and optic disc drusen. Patients present high hyperopia, usually adult-onset progressive nyctalopia and reduced visual acuity, and, on occasion, acute-angle glaucoma.
Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 12
MedGen UID:
388698
Concept ID:
C2673676
Finding
Episodic ataxia type 6
MedGen UID:
390739
Concept ID:
C2675211
Disease or Syndrome
An exceedingly rare form of hereditary episodic ataxia with varying degrees of ataxia and associated findings including slurred speech, headache, confusion and hemiplegia.
Sarcoidosis, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
394568
Concept ID:
C2697310
Finding
Any sarcoidosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the HLA-DRB1 gene.
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
412573
Concept ID:
C2748527
Disease or Syndrome
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an uncommon genodermatosis characterized by follicular hyperkeratosis, progressive cicatricial alopecia, and photophobia. Most reported cases show X-linked inheritance (KFSDX; 308800) (Castori et al., 2009).
Leber congenital amaurosis 14
MedGen UID:
442375
Concept ID:
C2750063
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting rod and cone photoreceptors simultaneously. The most severe cases are termed Leber congenital amaurosis, whereas the less aggressive forms are usually considered juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (Gu et al., 1997). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Leber congenital amaurosis, see LCA1 (204000); for retinitis pigmentosa, see 268000.
Cone-rod dystrophy 13
MedGen UID:
413025
Concept ID:
C2750720
Disease or Syndrome
The first signs and symptoms of cone-rod dystrophy, which often occur in childhood, are usually decreased sharpness of vision (visual acuity) and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). These features are typically followed by impaired color vision (dyschromatopsia), blind spots (scotomas) in the center of the visual field, and partial side (peripheral) vision loss. Over time, affected individuals develop night blindness and a worsening of their peripheral vision, which can limit independent mobility. Decreasing visual acuity makes reading increasingly difficult and most affected individuals are legally blind by mid-adulthood. As the condition progresses, individuals may develop involuntary eye movements (nystagmus).\n\nThere are more than 30 types of cone-rod dystrophy, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and their pattern of inheritance: autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linked. Additionally, cone-rod dystrophy can occur alone without any other signs and symptoms or it can occur as part of a syndrome that affects multiple parts of the body.\n\nCone-rod dystrophy is a group of related eye disorders that causes vision loss, which becomes more severe over time. These disorders affect the retina, which is the layer of light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. In people with cone-rod dystrophy, vision loss occurs as the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate.
Choroidal dystrophy, central areolar 2
MedGen UID:
442696
Concept ID:
C2751290
Disease or Syndrome
Central areolar choroidal dystrophy-2 (CACD2) is a hereditary retinal disorder that principally affects the macula, often resulting in a well-defined area of atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and choriocapillaris in the center of the macula. Dysfunction of macular photoreceptors usually leads to a decrease in visual acuity, generally occurring between the ages of 30 and 60 years (summary by Boon et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of central areolar choroidal dystrophy, see CACD1 (215500).
Cone dystrophy 4
MedGen UID:
416518
Concept ID:
C2751308
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The manifestations are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography.
Glaucoma 3, primary congenital, D
MedGen UID:
416524
Concept ID:
C2751316
Disease or Syndrome
Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), enlargement of the globe (buphthalmos), edema, and opacification of the cornea with rupture of Descemet's membrane (Haab's striae), thinning of the anterior sclera and iris atrophy, anomalously deep anterior chamber, and structurally normal posterior segment except for progressive glaucomatous optic atrophy. Symptoms include photophobia, blepharospasm, and excessive tearing. Typically, the diagnosis is made in the first year of life. Depending on when treatment is instituted, visual acuity may be reduced and/or visual fields may be restricted. In untreated individuals, blindness invariably occurs.
Xeroderma pigmentosum, group C
MedGen UID:
416702
Concept ID:
C2752147
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Acute sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure) with marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age two years; Sunlight-induced ocular involvement (photophobia, severe keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids, ocular surface neoplasms); Greatly increased risk of sunlight-induced cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma) within the first decade of life. Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cognitive impairment, and ataxia). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Ocular cystinosis
MedGen UID:
419313
Concept ID:
C2931013
Disease or Syndrome
Cystinosis comprises three allelic phenotypes: Nephropathic cystinosis in untreated children is characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome, poor growth, hypophosphatemic/calcipenic rickets, impaired glomerular function resulting in complete glomerular failure, and accumulation of cystine in almost all cells, leading to cellular dysfunction with tissue and organ impairment. The typical untreated child has short stature, rickets, and photophobia. Failure to thrive is generally noticed after approximately age six months; signs of renal tubular Fanconi syndrome (polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and acidosis) appear as early as age six months; corneal crystals can be present before age one year and are always present after age 16 months. Prior to the use of renal transplantation and cystine-depleting therapy, the life span in nephropathic cystinosis was no longer than ten years. With these interventions, affected individuals can survive at least into the mid-forties or fifties with satisfactory quality of life. Intermediate cystinosis is characterized by all the typical manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis, but onset is at a later age. Renal glomerular failure occurs in all untreated affected individuals, usually between ages 15 and 25 years. The non-nephropathic (ocular) form of cystinosis is characterized clinically only by photophobia resulting from corneal cystine crystal accumulation.
Nephropathic cystinosis
MedGen UID:
419735
Concept ID:
C2931187
Disease or Syndrome
Cystinosis comprises three allelic phenotypes: Nephropathic cystinosis in untreated children is characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome, poor growth, hypophosphatemic/calcipenic rickets, impaired glomerular function resulting in complete glomerular failure, and accumulation of cystine in almost all cells, leading to cellular dysfunction with tissue and organ impairment. The typical untreated child has short stature, rickets, and photophobia. Failure to thrive is generally noticed after approximately age six months; signs of renal tubular Fanconi syndrome (polyuria, polydipsia, dehydration, and acidosis) appear as early as age six months; corneal crystals can be present before age one year and are always present after age 16 months. Prior to the use of renal transplantation and cystine-depleting therapy, the life span in nephropathic cystinosis was no longer than ten years. With these interventions, affected individuals can survive at least into the mid-forties or fifties with satisfactory quality of life. Intermediate cystinosis is characterized by all the typical manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis, but onset is at a later age. Renal glomerular failure occurs in all untreated affected individuals, usually between ages 15 and 25 years. The non-nephropathic (ocular) form of cystinosis is characterized clinically only by photophobia resulting from corneal cystine crystal accumulation.
Leber congenital amaurosis 1
MedGen UID:
419026
Concept ID:
C2931258
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis, also known as LCA, is an eye disorder that is present from birth (congenital). This condition primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. People with this disorder typically have severe visual impairment beginning at birth or shortly afterward. The visual impairment tends to be severe and may worsen over time.\n\nLeber congenital amaurosis is also associated with other vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). The pupils, which usually expand and contract in response to the amount of light entering the eye, do not react normally to light. Instead, they expand and contract more slowly than normal, or they may not respond to light at all.\n\nA specific behavior called Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign is characteristic of Leber congenital amaurosis. This sign consists of affected individuals poking, pressing, and rubbing their eyes with a knuckle or finger. Poking their eyes often results in the sensation of flashes of light called phosphenes. Researchers suspect that this behavior may contribute to deep-set eyes in affected children.\n\nIn very rare cases, delayed development and intellectual disability have been reported in people with the features of Leber congenital amaurosis. Because of the visual loss, affected children may become isolated. Providing children with opportunities to play, hear, touch, understand and other early educational interventions may prevent developmental delays in children with Leber congenital amaurosis.\n\nAt least 20 genetic types of Leber congenital amaurosis have been described. The types are distinguished by their genetic cause, patterns of vision loss, and related eye abnormalities.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
419514
Concept ID:
C2931875
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Retinitis pigmentosa 51
MedGen UID:
462065
Concept ID:
C3150715
Disease or Syndrome
Any retinitis pigmentosa in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TTC8 gene.
Cone-rod dystrophy 15
MedGen UID:
462262
Concept ID:
C3150912
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy-15 (CORD15) is characterized by onset of reduced vision in the third to fifth decades of life. Visual acuity progressively worsens, and most patients exhibit reduced color vision and central scotomas (Cohen et al., 2012; Sobolewska et al., 2023). Retinitis pigmentosa-65 (RP65) is an adult-onset form of RP, with night blindness developing in the second to fourth decades of life. In addition to constriction of visual fields, patients may experience photophobia, reduced visual acuity, and difficulties with color vision (Henderson et al., 2010; Bessette et al., 2018; Dawood et al., 2021). Retinal macular dystrophy-5 (MCDR5) is a late-onset form of macular dystrophy, with most patients noting symptoms in the fourth to sixth decades of life. Symptoms include reduced visual acuity, glare, poor contrast vision, and metamorphopsia; night blindness is uncommon (Stingl et al., 2017; Charbel Issa et al., 2019; Ba-Abbad et al., 2021). Macular atrophy is a characteristic feature in all patients, and early involvement may be observed even in patients with RP who exhibit relatively preserved visual acuity (Malechka et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cone-rod dystrophy, see 120970; for retinitis pigmentosa, see 268000; for retinal macular dystrophy, see 136550. Reviews Bessette et al. (2018) reviewed published reports of patients with disease-causing mutations in the CDHR1 gene. The median age of patients was 36 years, and the majority retained visual acuity of 20/70 or better in at least one eye. Most patients developed symptoms between the first and third decades of life (range, infancy through fourth decade). Night blindness was the most common presenting symptom (54%), followed by photosensitivity (39%) and decreased vision (31%). Macular atrophy was the most common fundus feature reported (96%), followed by vascular attenuation (69%) and peripheral bone spicules (54%). The authors noted significant inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability among patients with CDHR1 mutations.
Leber congenital amaurosis 7
MedGen UID:
462542
Concept ID:
C3151192
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis comprises a group of early-onset childhood retinal dystrophies characterized by vision loss, nystagmus, and severe retinal dysfunction. Patients usually present at birth with profound vision loss and pendular nystagmus. Electroretinogram (ERG) responses are usually nonrecordable. Other clinical findings may include high hypermetropia, photodysphoria, oculodigital sign, keratoconus, cataracts, and a variable appearance to the fundus (summary by Chung and Traboulsi, 2009). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LCA, see 204000.
Leber congenital amaurosis 15
MedGen UID:
462556
Concept ID:
C3151206
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive childhood-onset severe retinal dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of disorders affecting rod and cone photoreceptors simultaneously. The most severe cases are termed Leber congenital amaurosis, whereas the less aggressive forms are usually considered juvenile retinitis pigmentosa (summary by Gu et al., 1997). Mutation in TULP1 can also cause a form of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP14; 600132). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of Leber congenital amaurosis, see LCA1 (204000); for retinitis pigmentosa, see 268000.
Leber congenital amaurosis 16
MedGen UID:
481692
Concept ID:
C3280062
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis, also known as LCA, is an eye disorder that is present from birth (congenital). This condition primarily affects the retina, which is the specialized tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color. People with this disorder typically have severe visual impairment beginning at birth or shortly afterward. The visual impairment tends to be severe and may worsen over time.\n\nLeber congenital amaurosis is also associated with other vision problems, including an increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), involuntary movements of the eyes (nystagmus), and extreme farsightedness (hyperopia). The pupils, which usually expand and contract in response to the amount of light entering the eye, do not react normally to light. Instead, they expand and contract more slowly than normal, or they may not respond to light at all.\n\nA specific behavior called Franceschetti's oculo-digital sign is characteristic of Leber congenital amaurosis. This sign consists of affected individuals poking, pressing, and rubbing their eyes with a knuckle or finger. Poking their eyes often results in the sensation of flashes of light called phosphenes. Researchers suspect that this behavior may contribute to deep-set eyes in affected children.\n\nIn very rare cases, delayed development and intellectual disability have been reported in people with the features of Leber congenital amaurosis. Because of the visual loss, affected children may become isolated. Providing children with opportunities to play, hear, touch, understand and other early educational interventions may prevent developmental delays in children with Leber congenital amaurosis.\n\nAt least 20 genetic types of Leber congenital amaurosis have been described. The types are distinguished by their genetic cause, patterns of vision loss, and related eye abnormalities.
Congenital ichthyosis-intellectual disability-spastic quadriplegia syndrome
MedGen UID:
482486
Concept ID:
C3280856
Disease or Syndrome
ISQMR is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosis apparent from birth, profound psychomotor retardation with essentially no development, spastic quadriplegia, and seizures (summary by Aldahmesh et al., 2011).
Cone-rod dystrophy 16
MedGen UID:
482675
Concept ID:
C3281045
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy (CORD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are clinically and genetically overlapping heterogeneous retinal dystrophies. RP is characterized initially by rod photoreceptor dysfunction, giving rise to night blindness, which is followed by progressive rod and cone photoreceptor dystrophy, resulting in midperipheral vision loss, tunnel vision, and sometimes blindness. In contrast to RP, CORD is characterized by a primary loss of cone photoreceptors and subsequent or simultaneous loss of rod photoreceptors. The disease in most cases becomes apparent during primary-school years, and symptoms include photoaversion, decrease in visual acuity with or without nystagmus, color vision defects, and decreased sensitivity of the central visual field. Because rods are also involved, night blindness and peripheral vision loss can occur. The diagnosis of CORD is mainly based on electroretinogram (ERG) recordings, in which cone responses are more severely reduced than, or equally as reduced as rod responses (summary by Estrada-Cuzcano et al., 2012).
Usher syndrome type 3B
MedGen UID:
482696
Concept ID:
C3281066
Disease or Syndrome
Usher syndrome type III is characterized by postlingual, progressive hearing loss, variable vestibular dysfunction, and onset of retinitis pigmentosa symptoms, including nyctalopia, constriction of the visual fields, and loss of central visual acuity, usually by the second decade of life (Karjalainen et al., 1983; Pakarinen et al., 1995). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of type III Usher syndrome, see USH3A (276902).
Jalili syndrome
MedGen UID:
501210
Concept ID:
C3495589
Disease or Syndrome
Jalili syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder consisting of cone-rod dystrophy and amelogenesis imperfecta. Significant visual impairment with nystagmus and photophobia is present from infancy or early childhood and progresses with age. Enamel of primary and secondary dentitions is grossly abnormal and prone to rapid posteruptive failure, in part reflecting hypomineralization (summary by Parry et al., 2009).
Cone-rod dystrophy 17
MedGen UID:
767524
Concept ID:
C3554610
Disease or Syndrome
The first signs and symptoms of cone-rod dystrophy, which often occur in childhood, are usually decreased sharpness of vision (visual acuity) and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). These features are typically followed by impaired color vision (dyschromatopsia), blind spots (scotomas) in the center of the visual field, and partial side (peripheral) vision loss. Over time, affected individuals develop night blindness and a worsening of their peripheral vision, which can limit independent mobility. Decreasing visual acuity makes reading increasingly difficult and most affected individuals are legally blind by mid-adulthood. As the condition progresses, individuals may develop involuntary eye movements (nystagmus).\n\nThere are more than 30 types of cone-rod dystrophy, which are distinguished by their genetic cause and their pattern of inheritance: autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linked. Additionally, cone-rod dystrophy can occur alone without any other signs and symptoms or it can occur as part of a syndrome that affects multiple parts of the body.\n\nCone-rod dystrophy is a group of related eye disorders that causes vision loss, which becomes more severe over time. These disorders affect the retina, which is the layer of light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. In people with cone-rod dystrophy, vision loss occurs as the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate.
Oculocutaneous albinism type 6
MedGen UID:
811705
Concept ID:
C3805375
Disease or Syndrome
Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder, with a worldwide prevalence of approximately 1:17,000. It manifests as a reduction or complete loss of melanin in the skin, hair, and eyes, often accompanied by eye symptoms such as photophobia, strabismus, moderate to severe visual impairment, and nystagmus (summary by Wei et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of oculocutaneous albinism, see OCA1 (203100). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of variation in skin, hair, and eye pigmentation, see SHEP1 (227220).
Oculocutaneous albinism type 7
MedGen UID:
815116
Concept ID:
C3808786
Disease or Syndrome
Oculocutaneous albinism type VII (OCA7) is an autosomal recessive hypopigmentation disorder with predominant eye involvement including nystagmus, iris transillumination, and crossed asymmetry of the cortical visual response (Gronskov et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of oculocutaneous albinism, see OCA1 (203100).
Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 1
MedGen UID:
854348
Concept ID:
C3887485
Finding
Migraine is the most common type of chronic, episodic headache, as summarized by Featherstone (1985). One locus for migraine with or without aura (MGR1) has been identified on chromosome 4q24. Other loci for migraine have been identified on 6p21.1-p12.2 (MGR3; 607498), 14q21.2-q22.3 (MGR4; 607501), 19p13 (MGR5; 607508), 1q31 (MGR6; 607516), 15q11-q13 (MGR7; 609179), 5q21 (with or without aura, MGR8, 609570; with aura, MGR9, 609670), 17p13 (MGR10; 610208), 18q12 (MGR11; 610209), 10q22-q23 (MGR12; 611706), and the X chromosome (MGR2; 300125). Mutation in the KCNK18 gene (613655) on chromosome 10q25 causes migraine with aura (MGR13; 613656). See also familial hemiplegic migraine-1 (FHM1; 141500), a subtype of autosomal dominant migraine with aura (MA).
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans, X-linked
MedGen UID:
854384
Concept ID:
C3887525
Congenital Abnormality
Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans is an uncommon genodermatosis chiefly characterized by widespread keratosis pilaris, progressive cicatricial alopecia of the scalp, eyebrows, and eyelashes, and an excess of affected males. Photophobia, blepharitis/conjunctivitis, and corneal dystrophy are characteristic ancillary findings. It is most often inherited as an X-linked trait (summary by Castori et al., 2009). Autosomal dominant inheritance has also been reported (KFSD; 612843). The term 'cum ophiasi' means 'with ophiasis,' i.e., baldness in 1 or more winding streaks about the head, which comes from the Greek for snake. Decalvans refers to the loss of hair.
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
854714
Concept ID:
C3888007
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Oculocutaneous albinism type 5
MedGen UID:
854888
Concept ID:
C3888401
Congenital Abnormality
Oculocutaneous albinism is a genetically heterogeneous disorder manifested as a loss of pigmentation in the eyes, skin, and hair (summary by Kausar et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of oculocutaneous albinism, see OCA1 (203100).
Alacrima, congenital, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
861034
Concept ID:
C4012597
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder 2
MedGen UID:
863113
Concept ID:
C4014676
Disease or Syndrome
Ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder-2 is an autosomal recessive syndrome resulting from defects in DNA excision repair. Affected individuals have a neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by developmental delay, ataxia, and sensorineural hearing loss. Other features include short stature, cutaneous and ocular telangiectasia, and photosensitivity (summary by Baple et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ATLD, see ATLD1 (604391).
Retinal dystrophy with inner retinal dysfunction and ganglion cell anomalies
MedGen UID:
863583
Concept ID:
C4015146
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal dystrophy with inner retinal dysfunction and ganglion cell anomalies is a rare, genetic, retinal dystrophy disorder characterized by decreased central retinal sensitivity associated with hyper-reflectivity of ganglion cells and nerve fiber layer with loss of optic nerve fibers manifesting with photophobia, optic disc pallor and progressive loss of central vision with preservation of peripheral visual field.
Cone-rod synaptic disorder, congenital nonprogressive
MedGen UID:
874422
Concept ID:
C4041558
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital nonprogressive cone-rod synaptic disorder (CRSD) is characterized by stable low vision, nystagmus, photophobia, a normal or near-normal fundus appearance, and no night blindness. Electroretinography shows an electronegative waveform response to scotopic bright flash, near-normal to subnormal rod function, and delayed and/or decreased to nonrecordable cone responses (Traboulsi, 2013; Khan, 2014).
Cone-rod dystrophy 21
MedGen UID:
891534
Concept ID:
C4049066
Disease or Syndrome
Any cone-rod dystrophy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the DRAM2 gene.
Optic atrophy 10 with or without ataxia, intellectual disability, and seizures
MedGen UID:
905727
Concept ID:
C4225227
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia 7
MedGen UID:
904646
Concept ID:
C4225297
Disease or Syndrome
Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The manifestations are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography.
Retinitis pigmentosa 72
MedGen UID:
895867
Concept ID:
C4225315
Disease or Syndrome
Any retinitis pigmentosa in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ZNF408 gene.
Congenital stationary night blindness 1H
MedGen UID:
934725
Concept ID:
C4310758
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital stationary night blindness type 1H (CSNB1H) is an unusual and unique stationary retinal disorder with a dual anomaly in visual processing, characterized by a partial or severe degree of ON bipolar dysfunction and variably reduced cone sensitivity. Patients present with childhood-onset night blindness and middle age-onset photophobia, but have near-normal vision and do not exhibit nystagmus or high myopia (Vincent et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital stationary night blindness, see CSNB1A (310500).
Alacrima, congenital, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
934803
Concept ID:
C4310836
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with arthritis and dyskeratosis
MedGen UID:
1380109
Concept ID:
C4479278
Disease or Syndrome
Autoinflammation with arthritis and dyskeratosis is characterized by recurrent fever, widespread skin dyskeratosis, arthritis, elevated biologic markers of inflammation, and mild autoimmunity with a high transitional B-cell level (summary by Grandemange et al., 2016).
Retinitis pigmentosa 79
MedGen UID:
1386200
Concept ID:
C4479526
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal dystrophy with or without macular staphyloma
MedGen UID:
1381980
Concept ID:
C4479651
Disease or Syndrome
Tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism
MedGen UID:
1643910
Concept ID:
C4551504
Disease or Syndrome
Oculocutaneous albinism is a group of conditions that affect coloring (pigmentation) of the skin, hair, and eyes. Affected individuals typically have very fair skin and white or light-colored hair. Long-term sun exposure greatly increases the risk of skin damage and skin cancers, including an aggressive form of skin cancer called melanoma, in people with this condition. Oculocutaneous albinism also reduces pigmentation of the colored part of the eye (the iris) and the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina). People with this condition usually have vision problems such as reduced sharpness; rapid, involuntary eye movements (nystagmus); and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia).\n\nResearchers have identified multiple types of oculocutaneous albinism, which are distinguished by their specific skin, hair, and eye color changes and by their genetic cause. Oculocutaneous albinism type 1 is characterized by white hair, very pale skin, and light-colored irises. Type 2 is typically less severe than type 1; the skin is usually a creamy white color and hair may be light yellow, blond, or light brown. Type 3 includes a form of albinism called rufous oculocutaneous albinism, which usually affects dark-skinned people. Affected individuals have reddish-brown skin, ginger or red hair, and hazel or brown irises. Type 3 is often associated with milder vision abnormalities than the other forms of oculocutaneous albinism. Type 4 has signs and symptoms similar to those seen with type 2.\n\nSeveral additional types of this disorder have been proposed, each affecting one or a few families.
Supranuclear palsy, progressive, 1
MedGen UID:
1640811
Concept ID:
C4551863
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of clinical manifestations of MAPT-related frontotemporal dementia (MAPT-FTD) has expanded from its original description of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonian manifestations to include changes in behavior, motor function, memory, and/or language. A recent retrospective study suggested that the majority of affected individuals have either behavioral changes consistent with a diagnosis of behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) or, less commonly, a parkinsonian syndrome (i.e., progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal syndrome, or Parkinson disease). Fewer than 5% of people with MAPT-FTD have primary progressive aphasia or Alzheimer disease. Clinical presentation may differ between and within families with the same MAPT variant. MAPT-FTD is a progressive disorder that commonly ends with a relatively global dementia in which some affected individuals become mute. Progression of motor impairment in affected individuals results in some becoming chairbound and others bedbound. Mean disease duration is 9.3 (SD: 6.4) years but is individually variable and can be more than 30 years in some instances.
Patterned macular dystrophy 1
MedGen UID:
1646806
Concept ID:
C4551999
Disease or Syndrome
Patterned dystrophies of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) refer to a heterogeneous group of macular disorders, characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE. The lipofuscin is most apparent in the macular area, and its distribution can show various sizes and shapes. High inter- and intrafamilial variability has been described, and retinitis pigmentosa (RP; see 268000)-like changes have sometimes been observed in association with patterned dystrophies (summary by Vaclavik et al., 2012). Three main varieties of patterned dystrophy of the RPE have been described: reticular ('fishnet-like') dystrophy (see 179840 and 267800), macroreticular ('spider-shaped') dystrophy, and butterfly-shaped pigment dystrophy of the fovea. Genetic Heterogeneity of Patterned Macular Dystrophy Also see MDPT2 (608970), caused by mutation in the CTNNA1 gene (116805) on chromosome 5q31; and MDPT3 (617111), caused by mutation in the MAPKAPK3 gene (602130) on chromosome 3p21.
Leber congenital amaurosis with early-onset deafness
MedGen UID:
1646810
Concept ID:
C4693498
Disease or Syndrome
Leber congenital amaurosis with early-onset deafness (LCAEOD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome manifesting as early-onset and severe photoreceptor and cochlear cell loss. Some patients show extinguished responses on electroretinography and moderate to severe hearing loss at birth (Luscan et al., 2017).
Cataract 2, multiple types
MedGen UID:
1648415
Concept ID:
C4721890
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYGC gene have been found to cause several types of cataract, which have been described as Coppock-like; embryonic, fetal, infantile nuclear; zonular pulverulent; and lamellar. Some patients also exhibit microcornea. Before it was known that mutations in the CRYGC gene cause several types of cataract, this entry was titled 'Cataract, Coppock-like,' with the symbol CCL.
Cone-rod dystrophy and hearing loss 1
MedGen UID:
1682048
Concept ID:
C5193018
Disease or Syndrome
CRDHL1 is characterized by cone-rod dystrophy and sensorineural hearing loss, with relatively late onset of both ocular and hearing impairment. The funduscopic findings are characteristic, showing ring-shaped atrophy along the major vascular arcades that manifests on fundus autofluorescence as a hypoautofluorescent band along the vascular arcades surrounded by hyperautofluorescent borders (Namburi et al., 2016). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cone-Rod Dystrophy and Hearing Loss CRDHL2 (618358) is caused by mutation in the CEP250 gene (609689) on chromosome 20q11.
Cone-rod dystrophy and hearing loss 2
MedGen UID:
1675017
Concept ID:
C5193051
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy and hearing loss-2 (CRDHL2) is characterized by retinal dystrophy, with photophobia and progressive reduction in visual acuity, associated with sensorineural hearing loss (Kubota et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of cone-rod dystrophy and hearing loss, see CRDHL1 (617236).
Ectodermal dysplasia 15, hypohidrotic/hair type
MedGen UID:
1680605
Concept ID:
C5193145
Disease or Syndrome
Some ectodermal dysplasias are here classified as congenital disorders characterized by abnormal development in 2 or more ectodermal structures (hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands) without other systemic findings. Ectodermal dysplasia-15 (ECTD15) is characterized by hypotrichosis that develops in early childhood and absence of sweating except with extreme exercise. Skin is dry from birth and eczematous lesions may develop in adulthood. Other features include blepharitis and photophobia (van den Bogaard et al., 2019).
Ichthyotic keratoderma, spasticity, hypomyelination, and dysmorphic facial features
MedGen UID:
1682428
Concept ID:
C5193147
Disease or Syndrome
Ichthyotic keratoderma, spasticity, hypomyelination, and dysmorphic features (IKSHD) is characterized by epidermal hyperproliferation and increased keratinization, resulting in ichthyosis; hypomyelination of central white matter, causing spastic paraplegia and central nystagmus; and optic atrophy, resulting in reduction of peripheral vision and visual acuity (Mueller et al., 2019). In addition, patients exhibit mild facial dysmorphism (Kutkowska-Kazmierczak et al., 2018).
Corneal dystrophy, Meesmann, 2
MedGen UID:
1684798
Concept ID:
C5231495
Disease or Syndrome
Meesmann corneal dystrophy-2 (MECD2) is characterized by fragility of the anterior corneal epithelium and the presence of intraepithelial microcysts. Although the disease is generally mild and affected individuals are often asymptomatic, some suffer from recurrent erosions leading to lacrimation, photophobia, and deterioration in visual acuity (summary by Szaflik et al., 2008). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Meesmann corneal dystrophy, see MECD1 (122100).
Corneal dystrophy, Meesmann, 1
MedGen UID:
1684668
Concept ID:
C5231499
Disease or Syndrome
IFAP syndrome 1, with or without BRESHECK syndrome
MedGen UID:
1746744
Concept ID:
C5399971
Disease or Syndrome
The IFAP/BRESHECK syndrome is an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly disorder with variable severity. The classic triad, which defines IFAP, is ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia, and photophobia. Some patients have additional features, including mental retardation, brain anomalies, Hirschsprung disease, corneal opacifications, kidney dysplasia, cryptorchidism, cleft palate, and skeletal malformations, particularly of the vertebrae, which constitutes BRESHECK syndrome (summary by Naiki et al., 2012). Genetic Heterogeneity of IFAP Syndrome IFAP syndrome-2 (IFAP2; 619016) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the SREBF1 gene (184756) on chromosome 17p11.
Cone-rod synaptic disorder syndrome, congenital nonprogressive
MedGen UID:
1773574
Concept ID:
C5436505
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital nonprogressive cone-rod synaptic disorder syndrome (CRSDS) is characterized by retinal and neurodevelopmental disease as well as occasional anomalies of glucose homeostasis. Patients exhibit low vision, photophobia, and nystagmus, and show an electronegative waveform in response to bright flash under dark adaptation on electroretinography, with severely reduced and delayed light-adapted responses. Neurodevelopmental features include poor to no language and autistic behaviors (Mechaussier et al., 2020).
Optic atrophy 12
MedGen UID:
1720703
Concept ID:
C5436534
Disease or Syndrome
Optic atrophy-12 (OPA12) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by slowly progressive visual impairment with onset usually in the first decade, although later onset has been reported. Affected individuals have impaired color vision, photophobia, pale optic discs, optic nerve atrophy, and decreased thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Some patients may exhibit additional neurologic features, including impaired intellectual development, dystonia, movement disorders, or ataxia (summary by Caporali et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of optic atrophy, see OPA1 (165500).
IFAP syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
1763502
Concept ID:
C5436607
Disease or Syndrome
Follicular ichthyosis, atrichia, and photophobia syndrome-2 (IFAP2) is characterized by ichthyosis follicularis or follicular hyperkeratosis, sparse to no body hair, and photophobia with corneal lesions. Ultrastructural hair analysis shows trichorrhexis nodosa (Wang et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of IFAP syndrome, see IFAP1 (308205).
Oculocutaneous albinism type 8
MedGen UID:
1754121
Concept ID:
C5436929
Disease or Syndrome
Oculocutaneous albinism type VIII (OCA8) is characterized by mild hair and skin hypopigmentation, associated with ocular features including nystagmus, reduced visual acuity, iris transillumination, and hypopigmentation of the retina (Pennamen et al., 2021).
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 11
MedGen UID:
1727728
Concept ID:
C5436936
Disease or Syndrome
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1.
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy 3
MedGen UID:
1794166
Concept ID:
C5561956
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopharyngodistal myopathy-3 (OPDM3) is a neuromyodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness with ocular, facial, pharyngeal, and distal limb involvement, resulting in dysarthria and gait difficulties. The onset of the disorder is usually in adulthood, although childhood onset has rarely been reported. Additional features include hyporeflexia, proximal muscle weakness, neck muscle weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and ptosis. Some patients may develop pigmentary retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, or hearing loss. Cognition is usually not affected, but there may be deficits or psychiatric manifestations. Brain imaging tends to show a leukoencephalopathy, often with a characteristic linear signal along the corticomedullary junction on brain imaging. Skin and muscle biopsy show intranuclear inclusions and rimmed vacuoles. Many of the clinical features are reminiscent of NIID, suggesting that these disorders likely fall within a broad phenotypic spectrum of diseases with neuromyodegenerative features associated with abnormal repeat expansions in this gene (summary by Ogasawara et al., 2020 and Yu et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of OPDM, see OPDM1 (164310).
Cone-rod dystrophy 22
MedGen UID:
1794199
Concept ID:
C5561989
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy-22 (CORD22) is a retinal dystrophy characterized by loss of central vision due to cone photoreceptor degeneration, with onset of symptoms ranging from the first to fifth decades of life. There is significant degeneration of the macula, as well as generalized cone system involvement that predominates over rod system dysfunction, including in the peripheral retina (Bertrand et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CORD, see CORD2 (120970).
Chromosome 16q12 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794292
Concept ID:
C5562082
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 16q12 duplication syndrome is characterized by early-onset progressive cone dystrophy, with early blue cone involvement. Patients report reduced visual acuity in the first decade of life, as well as difficulty differentiating colors, photophobia, and reduced night vision (Kohl et al., 2021). Tritanopia can also be caused by heterozygous mutation in the OPN1SW gene (613522) on chromosome 7q32 (see 190900).
Cone-rod dystrophy 24
MedGen UID:
1841082
Concept ID:
C5830446
Disease or Syndrome
Cone-rod dystrophy-24 (CORD24) is characterized by night blindness, defective color vision, and reduced visual acuity. Macular atrophy, macular pigmentation deposits, and drusen-like deposits in the macula have been observed. Age at onset varies widely, from the first to the sixth decades of live (Kobayashi et al., 2000; Huang et al., 2013; Zenteno et al., 2023). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CORD, see CORD2 (120970).
Prolonged electroretinal response suppression 2
MedGen UID:
1841088
Concept ID:
C5830452
Finding
Prolonged electroretinal response suppression-2 (PERRS2), also referred to as bradyopsia-2, is an autosomal recessive childhood-onset retinopathy characterized by markedly delayed dark and light adaptation, mild photophobia, difficulty seeing moving objects, moderately reduced visual acuity, normal color vision, normal fundi, and reduced rod and cone responses with prolonged recovery on electrophysiologic assessment (summary by Michaelides et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of prolonged electroretinal response suppression (PERRS), see 608415.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Khan J, Asoom LIA, Sunni AA, Rafique N, Latif R, Saif SA, Almandil NB, Almohazey D, AbdulAzeez S, Borgio JF
Biomed Pharmacother 2021 Jul;139:111557. Epub 2021 May 17 doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2021.111557. PMID: 34243621
Dolati S, Rikhtegar R, Mehdizadeh A, Yousefi M
Biol Trace Elem Res 2020 Aug;196(2):375-383. Epub 2019 Nov 5 doi: 10.1007/s12011-019-01931-z. PMID: 31691193
Katz BJ, Digre KB
Surv Ophthalmol 2016 Jul-Aug;61(4):466-77. Epub 2016 Feb 12 doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2016.02.001. PMID: 26875996

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Dodick DW, Lipton RB, Ailani J, Lu K, Finnegan M, Trugman JM, Szegedi A
N Engl J Med 2019 Dec 5;381(23):2230-2241. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1813049. PMID: 31800988
Eggersdorfer M, Wyss A
Arch Biochem Biophys 2018 Aug 15;652:18-26. Epub 2018 Jun 6 doi: 10.1016/j.abb.2018.06.001. PMID: 29885291
Shukla B, Aguilera EA, Salazar L, Wootton SH, Kaewpoowat Q, Hasbun R
J Clin Virol 2017 Sep;94:110-114. Epub 2017 Aug 4 doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2017.07.016. PMID: 28806629Free PMC Article
Gong Q, Janowski M, Luo M, Wei H, Chen B, Yang G, Liu L
JAMA Ophthalmol 2017 Jun 1;135(6):624-630. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2017.1091. PMID: 28494063Free PMC Article
Grønskov K, Ek J, Brondum-Nielsen K
Orphanet J Rare Dis 2007 Nov 2;2:43. doi: 10.1186/1750-1172-2-43. PMID: 17980020Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Artemenko AR, Filatova E, Vorobyeva YD, Do TP, Ashina M, Danilov AB
Headache 2022 Jan;62(1):4-10. doi: 10.1111/head.14250. PMID: 35041220
Wilkins AJ, Haigh SM, Mahroo OA, Plant GT
Cephalalgia 2021 Oct;41(11-12):1240-1248. Epub 2021 May 14 doi: 10.1177/03331024211014633. PMID: 33990148Free PMC Article
Katz BJ, Digre KB
Surv Ophthalmol 2016 Jul-Aug;61(4):466-77. Epub 2016 Feb 12 doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2016.02.001. PMID: 26875996
Bernardes TF, Bonfioli AA
Semin Ophthalmol 2010 May;25(3):79-83. doi: 10.3109/08820538.2010.488562. PMID: 20590417
Jun J, Bielory L, Raizman MB
Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2008 Feb;28(1):59-82, vi. doi: 10.1016/j.iac.2007.12.007. PMID: 18282546

Therapy

Yam JC, Zhang XJ, Zhang Y, Yip BHK, Tang F, Wong ES, Bui CHT, Kam KW, Ng MPH, Ko ST, Yip WWK, Young AL, Tham CC, Chen LJ, Pang CP
JAMA 2023 Feb 14;329(6):472-481. doi: 10.1001/jama.2022.24162. PMID: 36786791Free PMC Article
Dodick DW, Lipton RB, Ailani J, Lu K, Finnegan M, Trugman JM, Szegedi A
N Engl J Med 2019 Dec 5;381(23):2230-2241. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1813049. PMID: 31800988
Lamb YN
Drugs 2019 Dec;79(18):1989-1996. doi: 10.1007/s40265-019-01225-7. PMID: 31749059
Eggersdorfer M, Wyss A
Arch Biochem Biophys 2018 Aug 15;652:18-26. Epub 2018 Jun 6 doi: 10.1016/j.abb.2018.06.001. PMID: 29885291
Michalakis S, Schön C, Becirovic E, Biel M
J Gene Med 2017 Mar;19(3) doi: 10.1002/jgm.2944. PMID: 28095637

Prognosis

Yam JC, Zhang XJ, Zhang Y, Yip BHK, Tang F, Wong ES, Bui CHT, Kam KW, Ng MPH, Ko ST, Yip WWK, Young AL, Tham CC, Chen LJ, Pang CP
JAMA 2023 Feb 14;329(6):472-481. doi: 10.1001/jama.2022.24162. PMID: 36786791Free PMC Article
Ahmad SR, Rosendale N
Curr Pain Headache Rep 2022 Jul;26(7):505-516. Epub 2022 Jun 9 doi: 10.1007/s11916-022-01052-8. PMID: 35679008Free PMC Article
Fischer MD, Michalakis S, Wilhelm B, Zobor D, Muehlfriedel R, Kohl S, Weisschuh N, Ochakovski GA, Klein R, Schoen C, Sothilingam V, Garcia-Garrido M, Kuehlewein L, Kahle N, Werner A, Dauletbekov D, Paquet-Durand F, Tsang S, Martus P, Peters T, Seeliger M, Bartz-Schmidt KU, Ueffing M, Zrenner E, Biel M, Wissinger B
JAMA Ophthalmol 2020 Jun 1;138(6):643-651. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2020.1032. PMID: 32352493Free PMC Article
Laker SR
Curr Pain Headache Rep 2015 Aug;19(8):41. doi: 10.1007/s11916-015-0510-3. PMID: 26122533
Roos KL, van de Beek D
Handb Clin Neurol 2010;96:51-63. Epub 2010 Jan 19 doi: 10.1016/S0072-9752(09)96004-3. PMID: 20109674

Clinical prediction guides

Artemenko AR, Filatova E, Vorobyeva YD, Do TP, Ashina M, Danilov AB
Headache 2022 Jan;62(1):4-10. doi: 10.1111/head.14250. PMID: 35041220
Fischer MD, Michalakis S, Wilhelm B, Zobor D, Muehlfriedel R, Kohl S, Weisschuh N, Ochakovski GA, Klein R, Schoen C, Sothilingam V, Garcia-Garrido M, Kuehlewein L, Kahle N, Werner A, Dauletbekov D, Paquet-Durand F, Tsang S, Martus P, Peters T, Seeliger M, Bartz-Schmidt KU, Ueffing M, Zrenner E, Biel M, Wissinger B
JAMA Ophthalmol 2020 Jun 1;138(6):643-651. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2020.1032. PMID: 32352493Free PMC Article
Burstein R, Noseda R, Fulton AB
J Neuroophthalmol 2019 Mar;39(1):94-102. doi: 10.1097/WNO.0000000000000766. PMID: 30762717Free PMC Article
Tsang SH, Sharma T
Adv Exp Med Biol 2018;1085:119-123. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-95046-4_24. PMID: 30578497
Roos KL, van de Beek D
Handb Clin Neurol 2010;96:51-63. Epub 2010 Jan 19 doi: 10.1016/S0072-9752(09)96004-3. PMID: 20109674

Recent systematic reviews

Li G, Duan S, Zhu T, Ren Z, Xia H, Wang Z, Liu L, Liu Z
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Bruschi G, Ghiglioni DG, Cozzi L, Osnaghi S, Viola F, Marchisio P
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Dekhou A, Oska N, Partiali B, Johnson J, Chung MT, Folbe A
J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 Aug;79(8):1723-1730. Epub 2021 Mar 29 doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2021.03.008. PMID: 33974919
Vallerand IA, Lewinson RT, Farris MS, Sibley CD, Ramien ML, Bulloch AGM, Patten SB
Br J Dermatol 2018 Jan;178(1):76-85. Epub 2017 Dec 8 doi: 10.1111/bjd.15668. PMID: 28542914
Sweeney K, Silver N, Javadpour M
BMJ Clin Evid 2016 Mar 17;2016 PMID: 26983641Free PMC Article

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