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Left ventricular hypertrophy

MedGen UID:
57442
Concept ID:
C0149721
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Hypertrophies, Left Ventricular; Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular; Left Ventricular Hypertrophies; Left Ventricular Hypertrophy; Ventricular Hypertrophies, Left; Ventricular Hypertrophy, Left
SNOMED CT: LV hypertrophy (55827005); LV+ - Left ventricular hypertrophy (55827005); LVH - Left ventricular hypertrophy (55827005); Left ventricular hypertrophy (55827005)
 
HPO: HP:0001712

Definition

Enlargement or increased size of the heart left ventricle. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Fabry disease
MedGen UID:
8083
Concept ID:
C0002986
Disease or Syndrome
Fabry disease is the most common of the lysosomal storage disorders and results from deficient activity of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (a-Gal A), leading to progressive lysosomal deposition of globotriaosylceramide and its derivatives in cells throughout the body. The classic form, occurring in males with less than 1% a-Gal A enzyme activity, usually has its onset in childhood or adolescence with periodic crises of severe pain in the extremities (acroparesthesia), the appearance of vascular cutaneous lesions (angiokeratomas), sweating abnormalities (anhidrosis, hypohidrosis, and rarely hyperhidrosis), characteristic corneal and lenticular opacities, and proteinuria. Gradual deterioration of renal function to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) usually occurs in men in the third to fifth decade. In middle age, most males successfully treated for ESRD develop cardiac and/or cerebrovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Heterozygous females typically have milder symptoms at a later age of onset than males. Rarely, females may be relatively asymptomatic throughout a normal life span or may have symptoms as severe as those observed in males with the classic phenotype. In contrast, late-onset forms occur in males with greater than 1% a-Gal A activity. Clinical manifestations include cardiac disease, which usually presents in the sixth to eighth decade with left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, and proteinuria; renal failure, associated with ESRD but without the skin lesions or pain; or cerebrovascular disease presenting as stroke or transient ischemic attack.
Tangier disease
MedGen UID:
52644
Concept ID:
C0039292
Disease or Syndrome
Tangier disease is characterized by severe deficiency or absence of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the circulation resulting in tissue accumulation of cholesteryl esters throughout the body, particularly in the reticuloendothelial system. The major clinical signs of Tangier disease include hyperplastic yellow-orange tonsils, hepatosplenomegaly, and peripheral neuropathy, which may be either relapsing-remitting or chronic progressive in nature. Rarer complications may include corneal opacities that typically do not affect vision, premature atherosclerotic coronary artery disease occurring in the sixth and seventh decades of life (not usually before age 40 years), and mild hematologic manifestations, such as mild thrombocytopenia, reticulocytosis, stomatocytosis, or hemolytic anemia. The clinical expression of Tangier disease is variable, with some affected individuals only showing biochemical perturbations.
Juvenile myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis AND stroke
MedGen UID:
56485
Concept ID:
C0162671
Disease or Syndrome
MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) is a multisystem disorder with protean manifestations. The vast majority of affected individuals develop signs and symptoms of MELAS between ages two and 40 years. Common clinical manifestations include stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy with seizures and/or dementia, muscle weakness and exercise intolerance, normal early psychomotor development, recurrent headaches, recurrent vomiting, hearing impairment, peripheral neuropathy, learning disability, and short stature. During the stroke-like episodes neuroimaging shows increased T2-weighted signal areas that do not correspond to the classic vascular distribution (hence the term "stroke-like"). Lactic acidemia is very common and muscle biopsies typically show ragged red fibers.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1D
MedGen UID:
316943
Concept ID:
C1832243
Disease or Syndrome
Left ventricular noncompaction is a heart (cardiac) muscle disorder that occurs when the lower left chamber of the heart (left ventricle), which helps the heart pump blood, does not develop correctly. Instead of the muscle being smooth and firm, the cardiac muscle in the left ventricle is thick and appears spongy. The abnormal cardiac muscle is weak and has an impaired ability to pump blood because it either cannot completely contract or it cannot completely relax. For the heart to pump blood normally, cardiac muscle must contract and relax fully.\n\nSome individuals with left ventricular noncompaction experience no symptoms at all; others have heart problems that can include sudden cardiac death. Additional signs and symptoms include abnormal blood clots, irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia), a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), extreme fatigue during exercise (exercise intolerance), shortness of breath (dyspnea), fainting (syncope), swelling of the legs (lymphedema), and trouble laying down flat. Some affected individuals have features of other heart defects. Left ventricular noncompaction can be diagnosed at any age, from birth to late adulthood. Approximately two-thirds of individuals with left ventricular noncompaction develop heart failure.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1C
MedGen UID:
316944
Concept ID:
C1832244
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant subtype of dilated cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the LDB3 gene, encoding LIM domain-binding protein 3.
Sick sinus syndrome 2, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
320273
Concept ID:
C1834144
Disease or Syndrome
Sick sinus syndrome (also known as sinus node dysfunction) is a group of related heart conditions that can affect how the heart beats. "Sick sinus" refers to the sino-atrial (SA) node, which is an area of specialized cells in the heart that functions as a natural pacemaker. The SA node generates electrical impulses that start each heartbeat. These signals travel from the SA node to the rest of the heart, signaling the heart (cardiac) muscle to contract and pump blood. In people with sick sinus syndrome, the SA node does not function normally. In some cases, it does not produce the right signals to trigger a regular heartbeat. In others, abnormalities disrupt the electrical impulses and prevent them from reaching the rest of the heart.\n\nSick sinus syndrome occurs most commonly in older adults, although it can be diagnosed in people of any age. The condition increases the risk of several life-threatening problems involving the heart and blood vessels. These include a heart rhythm abnormality called atrial fibrillation, heart failure, cardiac arrest, and stroke.\n\nSick sinus syndrome tends to cause the heartbeat to be too slow (bradycardia), although occasionally the heartbeat is too fast (tachycardia). In some cases, the heartbeat rapidly switches from being too fast to being too slow, a condition known as tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome. Symptoms related to abnormal heartbeats can include dizziness, light-headedness, fainting (syncope), a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), and confusion or memory problems. During exercise, many affected individuals experience chest pain, difficulty breathing, or excessive tiredness (fatigue). Once symptoms of sick sinus syndrome appear, they usually worsen with time. However, some people with the condition never experience any related health problems.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 10
MedGen UID:
331754
Concept ID:
C1834460
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYL2 gene.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 8
MedGen UID:
324806
Concept ID:
C1837471
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYL3 gene.
Uruguay Faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
335320
Concept ID:
C1846010
Disease or Syndrome
Uruguay faciocardiomusculoskeletal syndrome (FCMSU) is an X-linked disorder in which affected males have a distinctive facial appearance, muscular hypertrophy, and cardiac ventricular hypertrophy leading to premature death. Additional features include large, broad, and deformed hands and feet, congenital hip dislocation, and scoliosis (summary by Xue et al., 2016).
Vici syndrome
MedGen UID:
340962
Concept ID:
C1855772
Disease or Syndrome
With the current widespread use of multigene panels and comprehensive genomic testing, it has become apparent that the phenotypic spectrum of EPG5-related disorder represents a continuum. At the most severe end of the spectrum is classic Vici syndrome (defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystem involvement characterized by the combination of agenesis of the corpus callosum, cataracts, hypopigmentation, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and failure to thrive); at the milder end of the spectrum are attenuated neurodevelopmental phenotypes with variable multisystem involvement. Median survival in classic Vici syndrome appears to be 24 months, with only 10% of children surviving longer than age five years; the most common causes of death are respiratory infections as a result of primary immunodeficiency and/or cardiac insufficiency resulting from progressive cardiac failure. No data are available on life span in individuals at the milder end of the spectrum.
Congenital lactic acidosis, Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean type
MedGen UID:
387801
Concept ID:
C1857355
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 5 (MC4DN5) is an autosomal recessive severe metabolic multisystemic disorder with onset in infancy. Features include delayed psychomotor development, impaired intellectual development with speech delay, mild dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, ataxia, and seizures. There is increased serum lactate and episodic hypoglycemia. Some patients may have cardiomyopathy, abnormal breathing, or liver abnormalities, reflecting systemic involvement. Brain imaging shows lesions in the brainstem and basal ganglia, consistent with a diagnosis of Leigh syndrome (see 256000). Affected individuals tend to have episodic metabolic and/or neurologic crises in early childhood, which often lead to early death (summary by Debray et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Left ventricular noncompaction 1
MedGen UID:
349005
Concept ID:
C1858725
Disease or Syndrome
Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is characterized by numerous prominent trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses in hypertrophied and hypokinetic segments of the left ventricle (Sasse-Klaassen et al., 2004). The mechanistic basis is thought to be an intrauterine arrest of myocardial development with lack of compaction of the loose myocardial meshwork. LVNC may occur in isolation or in association with congenital heart disease. Distinctive morphologic features can be recognized on 2-dimensional echocardiography (Kurosaki et al., 1999). Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is sometimes referred to as spongy myocardium. Stollberger et al. (2002) commented that the term 'isolated LVNC,' meaning LVNC without coexisting cardiac abnormalities, is misleading, because additional cardiac abnormalities are found in nearly all patients with LVNC. Genetic Heterogeneity of Left Ventricular Noncompaction A locus for autosomal dominant left ventricular noncompaction has been identified on chromosome 11p15 (LVNC2; 609470). LVNC3 (see 605906) is caused by mutation in the LDB3 gene (605906) on chromosome 10q23. LVNC4 (see 613424) is caused by mutation in the ACTC1 gene (102540) on chromosome 15q14. LVNC5 (see 613426) is caused by mutation in the MYH7 gene (160760) on chromosome 14q12. LVNC6 (see 601494) is caused by mutation in the TNNT2 gene (191045) on chromosome 1q32. LVNC7 (615092) is caused by mutation in the MIB1 gene (608677) on chromosome 18q11. LVNC8 (615373) is caused by mutation in the PRDM16 gene (605557) on chromosome 1p36. LVNC9 (see 611878) is caused by mutation in the TPM1 gene (191010) on chromosome 15q22. LVNC10 (615396) is caused by mutation in the MYBPC3 gene (600958) on chromosome 11p11. LVNC can also occur as part of an X-linked disorder, Barth syndrome (302060), caused by mutation in the TAZ gene (300394) on chromosome Xq28.
Cardiomyopathy, familial restrictive, 1
MedGen UID:
396236
Concept ID:
C1861861
Disease or Syndrome
Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a myocardial disease characterized by impaired ventricular filling and reduced diastolic volume in the presence of normal systolic function and normal or near-normal myocardial thickness. The disease is characterized by symptoms of progressive left- and right-sided heart failure. The overall prognosis is poor, especially when onset is in childhood, and patients often require cardiac transplantation (Mogensen et al., 2003). Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Other forms of familial restrictive cardiomyopathy include RCM2 (609578), mapped to chromosome 10q23; RCM3 (612422), caused by mutation in the TNNT2 gene (191045) on chromosome 1q32; RCM4 (see 615248), caused by mutation in the MYPN gene (608517) on chromosome 10q21; RCM5 (see 617047), caused by mutation in the FLNC gene (102565) on chromosome 7q32; and RCM6 (619433), caused by mutation in the KIF20A gene (605664) on chromosome 5q31.
Glycogen storage disease due to muscle and heart glycogen synthase deficiency
MedGen UID:
409741
Concept ID:
C1969054
Disease or Syndrome
The signs and symptoms of muscle GSD 0 typically begin in early childhood. Affected individuals often experience muscle pain and weakness or episodes of fainting (syncope) following moderate physical activity, such as walking up stairs. The loss of consciousness that occurs with fainting typically lasts up to several hours. Some individuals with muscle GSD 0 have a disruption of the heart's normal rhythm (arrhythmia) known as long QT syndrome. In all affected individuals, muscle GSD 0 impairs the heart's ability to effectively pump blood and increases the risk of cardiac arrest and sudden death, particularly after physical activity. Sudden death from cardiac arrest can occur in childhood or adolescence in people with muscle GSD 0.\n\nIndividuals with liver GSD 0 usually show signs and symptoms of the disorder in infancy. People with this disorder develop low blood sugar (glucose), known as hypoglycemia, after going long periods of time without food (fasting). Signs of hypoglycemia become apparent when affected infants begin sleeping through the night and stop late-night feedings; these infants exhibit extreme tiredness (lethargy), pale skin (pallor), and nausea. During episodes of fasting, ketone levels in the blood may increase (ketosis). Ketones are molecules produced during the breakdown of fats, which occurs when stored sugars (such as glycogen) are unavailable. These short-term signs and symptoms of liver GSD 0 often improve when food is eaten and glucose levels in the body return to normal. The features of liver GSD 0 vary; they can be mild and go unnoticed for years, or they can include developmental delay and growth failure.\n\nGlycogen storage disease type 0 (also known as GSD 0) is a condition caused by the body's inability to form a complex sugar called glycogen, which is a major source of stored energy in the body. GSD 0 has two types: in muscle GSD 0, glycogen formation in the muscles is impaired, and in liver GSD 0, glycogen formation in the liver is impaired.
Fontaine progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
394125
Concept ID:
C2676780
Disease or Syndrome
SLC25A24 Fontaine progeroid syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder characterized by poor growth, abnormal skeletal features, and distinctive craniofacial features with sagging, thin skin, and decreased subcutaneous fat suggesting an aged appearance that is most pronounced in infancy and improves with time. Characteristic radiographic features include turribrachycephaly with widely open anterior fontanelle, craniosynostosis, and anomalies of the terminal phalanges. Cardiovascular, genitourinary, ocular, and gastrointestinal abnormalities may also occur. To date, 13 individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis of SLC25A24 Fontaine progeroid syndrome have been described.
Atrial fibrillation, familial, 6
MedGen UID:
394252
Concept ID:
C2677294
Disease or Syndrome
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1AA
MedGen UID:
393713
Concept ID:
C2677338
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ACTN2 gene.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 11
MedGen UID:
436962
Concept ID:
C2677506
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the ACTC1 gene, encoding actin, alpha cardiac muscle 1.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 14
MedGen UID:
442484
Concept ID:
C2750467
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the MYH6 gene, encoding myosin-6.
COG1 congenital disorder of glycosylation
MedGen UID:
443957
Concept ID:
C2931011
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare form of carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome with, in the few cases reported to date, variable signs including microcephaly, growth retardation, psychomotor retardation and facial dysmorphism.
Bardet-Biedl syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
422452
Concept ID:
C2936862
Disease or Syndrome
Bardet-Biedl syndrome is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, kidney dysfunction, polydactyly, behavioral dysfunction, and hypogonadism (summary by Beales et al., 1999). Eight proteins implicated in the disorder assemble to form the BBSome, a stable complex involved in signaling receptor trafficking to and from cilia (summary by Scheidecker et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome BBS2 (615981) is caused by mutation in a gene on 16q13 (606151); BBS3 (600151), by mutation in the ARL6 gene on 3q11 (608845); BBS4 (615982), by mutation in a gene on 15q22 (600374); BBS5 (615983), by mutation in a gene on 2q31 (603650); BBS6 (605231), by mutation in the MKKS gene on 20p12 (604896); BBS7 (615984), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (607590); BBS8 (615985), by mutation in the TTC8 gene on 14q32 (608132); BBS9 (615986), by mutation in a gene on 7p14 (607968); BBS10 (615987), by mutation in a gene on 12q21 (610148); BBS11 (615988), by mutation in the TRIM32 gene on 9q33 (602290); BBS12 (615989), by mutation in a gene on 4q27 (610683); BBS13 (615990), by mutation in the MKS1 gene (609883) on 17q23; BBS14 (615991), by mutation in the CEP290 gene (610142) on 12q21, BBS15 (615992), by mutation in the WDPCP gene (613580) on 2p15; BBS16 (615993), by mutation in the SDCCAG8 gene (613524) on 1q43; BBS17 (615994), by mutation in the LZTFL1 gene (606568) on 3p21; BBS18 (615995), by mutation in the BBIP1 gene (613605) on 10q25; BBS19 (615996), by mutation in the IFT27 gene (615870) on 22q12; BBS20 (619471), by mutation in the IFT172 gene (607386) on 9p21; BBS21 (617406), by mutation in the CFAP418 gene (614477) on 8q22; and BBS22 (617119), by mutation in the IFT74 gene (608040) on 9p21. The CCDC28B gene (610162) modifies the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Mutations in MKS1, MKS3 (TMEM67; 609884), and C2ORF86 also modify the expression of BBS phenotypes in patients who have mutations in other genes. Although BBS had originally been thought to be a recessive disorder, Katsanis et al. (2001) demonstrated that clinical manifestation of some forms of Bardet-Biedl syndrome requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 loci plus an additional mutation in a second locus. While Katsanis et al. (2001) called this 'triallelic inheritance,' Burghes et al. (2001) suggested the term 'recessive inheritance with a modifier of penetrance.' Mykytyn et al. (2002) found no evidence of involvement of the common BBS1 mutation in triallelic inheritance. However, Fan et al. (2004) found heterozygosity in a mutation of the BBS3 gene (608845.0002) as an apparent modifier of the expression of homozygosity of the met390-to-arg mutation in the BBS1 gene (209901.0001). Allelic disorders include nonsyndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa: RP51 (613464), caused by TTC8 mutation, and RP55 (613575), caused by ARL6 mutation.
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with brain and eye anomalies), type A5
MedGen UID:
461763
Concept ID:
C3150413
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Beltran-Valero de Bernabe et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
Muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy (congenital with intellectual disability), type B2
MedGen UID:
461766
Concept ID:
C3150416
Disease or Syndrome
MDDGB2 is an autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with impaired intellectual development and mild structural brain abnormalities (Yanagisawa et al., 2007). It is part of a group of similar disorders, collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies,' resulting from defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239) (Godfrey et al., 2007). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type B, see MDDGB1 (613155).
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1R
MedGen UID:
462031
Concept ID:
C3150681
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ACTC1 gene.
Cranioectodermal dysplasia 2
MedGen UID:
462224
Concept ID:
C3150874
Disease or Syndrome
Cranioectodermal dysplasia (CED) is a ciliopathy with skeletal involvement (narrow thorax, shortened proximal limbs, syndactyly, polydactyly, brachydactyly), ectodermal features (widely spaced hypoplastic teeth, hypodontia, sparse hair, skin laxity, abnormal nails), joint laxity, growth deficiency, and characteristic facial features (frontal bossing, low-set simple ears, high forehead, telecanthus, epicanthal folds, full cheeks, everted lower lip). Most affected children develop nephronophthisis that often leads to end-stage kidney disease in infancy or childhood, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Hepatic fibrosis and retinal dystrophy are also observed. Dolichocephaly, often secondary to sagittal craniosynostosis, is a primary manifestation that distinguishes CED from most other ciliopathies. Brain malformations and developmental delay may also occur.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1V
MedGen UID:
462308
Concept ID:
C3150958
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PSEN2 gene.
Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome
MedGen UID:
462437
Concept ID:
C3151087
Disease or Syndrome
Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 16
MedGen UID:
462554
Concept ID:
C3151204
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYOZ2 gene.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 17
MedGen UID:
462614
Concept ID:
C3151264
Disease or Syndrome
An autosomal dominant subtype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutation(s) in the JPH2 gene, encoding junctophilin-2.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 18
MedGen UID:
462615
Concept ID:
C3151265
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PLN gene.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 20
MedGen UID:
462617
Concept ID:
C3151267
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the NEXN gene.
Atrial fibrillation, familial, 10
MedGen UID:
462814
Concept ID:
C3151464
Disease or Syndrome
Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance, affecting more than 2 million Americans, with an overall prevalence of 0.89%. The prevalence increases rapidly with age, to 2.3% between the ages of 40 and 60 years, and to 5.9% over the age of 65. The most dreaded complication is thromboembolic stroke (Brugada et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of atrial fibrillation, see 608583.
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1U
MedGen UID:
463620
Concept ID:
C3160720
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial isolated dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PSEN1 gene.
Atrial septal defect 7
MedGen UID:
477726
Concept ID:
C3276096
Disease or Syndrome
An extremely rare genetic congenital heart disease characterized by the presence of atrial septal defect, mostly of the ostium secundum type, associated with conduction anomalies like atrioventricular block, atrial fibrillation or right bundle branch block.
Larsen-like syndrome, B3GAT3 type
MedGen UID:
480034
Concept ID:
C3278404
Disease or Syndrome
CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal.
Childhood encephalopathy due to thiamine pyrophosphokinase deficiency
MedGen UID:
482496
Concept ID:
C3280866
Disease or Syndrome
Thiamine metabolism dysfunction syndrome-5 (THMD5) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder due to an inborn error of thiamine metabolism. The phenotype is highly variable, but in general, affected individuals have onset in early childhood of acute encephalopathic episodes associated with increased serum and CSF lactate. These episodes result in progressive neurologic dysfunction manifest as gait disturbances, ataxia, dystonia, and spasticity, which in some cases may result in loss of ability to walk. Cognitive function is usually preserved, although mildly delayed development has been reported. These episodes are usually associated with infection and metabolic decompensation. Some patients may have recovery of some neurologic deficits (Mayr et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of disorders due to thiamine metabolism dysfunction, see THMD1 (249270).
Encephalopathy-hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-renal tubular disease syndrome
MedGen UID:
766288
Concept ID:
C3553374
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 21
MedGen UID:
766356
Concept ID:
C3553442
Disease or Syndrome
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMH) is characterized by unexplained cardiac hypertrophy: thickening of the myocardial wall in the absence of any other identifiable cause for left ventricular hypertrophy such as systemic hypertension or valvular heart disease. Myocyte hypertrophy, disarray, and fibrosis are the histopathologic hallmarks of this disorder. Clinical features are diverse and include arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and heart failure. With an estimated prevalence of 1 in 500, CMH is the most common cardiovascular genetic disease and the most common cause of sudden death in competitive athletes in the United States (summary by Song et al., 2006). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, see CMH1 (192600).
Dilated cardiomyopathy 1KK
MedGen UID:
811544
Concept ID:
C3714995
Disease or Syndrome
Any dilated cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYPN gene.
Noonan syndrome 8
MedGen UID:
815563
Concept ID:
C3809233
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 12B (cardiomyopathic type), autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
815773
Concept ID:
C3809443
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome-12B is an autosomal recessive mitochondrial disorder characterized by childhood onset of slowly progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and generalized skeletal myopathy resulting in exercise intolerance, and, in some patients, muscle weakness and atrophy. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows ragged-red fibers, mtDNA depletion, and accumulation of abnormal mitochondria (summary by Echaniz-Laguna et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mtDNA depletion syndromes, see MTDPS1 (603041).
Aldosterone-producing adenoma with seizures and neurological abnormalities
MedGen UID:
815939
Concept ID:
C3809609
Disease or Syndrome
A rare, genetic, neurologic disease characterized by primary hyperaldosteronism presenting with early-onset, severe hypertension, hypokalemia and neurological manifestations (including seizures, severe hypotonia, spasticity, cerebral palsy and profound developmental delay/intellectual disability).
Paget disease of bone 6
MedGen UID:
908743
Concept ID:
C4085250
Disease or Syndrome
Paget disease of bone-6 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by adult onset of bone pain associated with polyostotic bone lesions primarily affecting the axial skeleton. A subset of patients can develop coronary artery disease and/or malignant giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone, which arises within the Paget bone lesions (summary by Divisato et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Paget disease of bone, see 167250.
Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency 8
MedGen UID:
908648
Concept ID:
C4225226
Disease or Syndrome
Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen.
Noonan syndrome 10
MedGen UID:
902892
Concept ID:
C4225280
Disease or Syndrome
Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 25
MedGen UID:
895360
Concept ID:
C4225408
Disease or Syndrome
Any hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the TCAP gene.
Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 10
MedGen UID:
924785
Concept ID:
C4284414
Disease or Syndrome
Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the LOX gene.
Somatotroph adenoma
MedGen UID:
1618709
Concept ID:
C4538355
Neoplastic Process
AIP familial isolated pituitary adenoma (AIP-FIPA) is defined as the presence of an AIP germline pathogenic variant in an individual with a pituitary adenoma (regardless of family history). The most commonly occurring pituitary adenomas in this disorder are growth hormone-secreting adenomas (somatotropinoma), followed by prolactin-secreting adenomas (prolactinoma), growth hormone and prolactin co-secreting adenomas (somatomammotropinoma), and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). Rarely TSH-secreting adenomas (thyrotropinomas) are observed. Clinical findings result from excess hormone secretion, lack of hormone secretion, and/or mass effects (e.g., headaches, visual field loss). Within the same family, pituitary adenomas can be of the same or different type. Age of onset in AIP-FIPA is usually in the second or third decade.
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 33
MedGen UID:
1623699
Concept ID:
C4540209
Disease or Syndrome
COXPD33 is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder resulting from a defect in mitochondrial energy metabolism. The phenotype is highly variable, ranging from death in infancy to adult-onset progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) and myopathy. A common finding is cardiomyopathy and increased serum lactate (summary by Feichtinger et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 6
MedGen UID:
1648496
Concept ID:
C4748759
Disease or Syndrome
NAD(P)HX dehydratase deficiency
MedGen UID:
1681210
Concept ID:
C5193026
Disease or Syndrome
Early-onset progressive encephalopathy with brain edema and/or leukoencephalopathy-2 (PEBEL2) is an autosomal recessive severe neurometabolic disorder characterized by rapidly progressive neurologic deterioration that is usually associated with a febrile illness. Affected infants tend to show normal early development followed by acute psychomotor regression with ataxia, hypotonia, and sometimes seizures, resulting in death in the first years of life. Brain imaging shows multiple abnormalities, including brain edema and signal abnormalities in the cortical and subcortical regions (summary by Van Bergen et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PEBEL, see PEBEL1 (617186).
Weiss-kruszka syndrome
MedGen UID:
1684748
Concept ID:
C5231429
Disease or Syndrome
Weiss-Kruszka syndrome is characterized by metopic ridging or synostosis, ptosis, nonspecific dysmorphic features, developmental delay, and autistic features. Brain imaging may identify abnormalities of the corpus callosum. Developmental delay can present as global delay, motor delay, or speech delay. Affected individuals may also have ear anomalies, feeding difficulties (sometimes requiring placement of a gastrostomy tube), and congenital heart defects. There is significant variability in the clinical features, even between affected members of the same family.
Usher syndrome, type 1M
MedGen UID:
1684669
Concept ID:
C5231434
Disease or Syndrome
Usher syndrome type 1M (USH1M) is characterized by prelingual sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa (Ahmed et al., 2018). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome, see USH1 (276900).
Myofibrillar myopathy 10
MedGen UID:
1769385
Concept ID:
C5436656
Disease or Syndrome
Myofibrillar myopathy-10 (MFM10) is an autosomal recessive structural muscle disorder characterized by onset of muscle pain, cramping, and exercise fatigue in the first or second decades of life. Some patients have mild contractures of the large joints apparent in early childhood. Affected individuals have a characteristic appearance of a thick neck and prominent shoulder girdle with anteverted shoulders and a tendency toward kyphosis. There is no apparent muscle weakness, but some affected individuals show progressive muscle rigidity leading to limited mobility. There is variable cardiac involvement, ranging from chest pain with left ventricular hypertrophy to subclinical signs such as abnormal EKG or elevated cardiac enzymes. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows structural abnormalities with myofibrillar disorganization and accumulation of autophagocytic vacuoles (summary by Hedberg-Oldfors et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419).
Mitochondrial complex 4 deficiency, nuclear type 4
MedGen UID:
1748100
Concept ID:
C5436683
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 4 (MC4DN4) is an autosomal recessive multisystem metabolic disorder characterized by the onset of symptoms in infancy. Affected individuals show hypotonia, failure to thrive, and neurologic distress. Additional features include hepatomegaly, hepatic steatosis, increased serum lactate, and metabolic acidosis. Some patients may develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Patient tissues show decreased levels and activity of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV. Death usually occurs in infancy (summary by Valnot et al., 2000 and Stiburek et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome
MedGen UID:
1741713
Concept ID:
C5436867
Disease or Syndrome
Mandibuloacral dysplasia progeroid syndrome (MDPS) is an autosomal recessive severe laminopathy-like disorder characterized by growth retardation, bone resorption, arterial calcification, renal glomerulosclerosis, and hypertension (Elouej et al., 2020).
Chromosome 13q33-q34 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
1744234
Concept ID:
C5436890
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 13q33-q34 deletion syndrome is associated with developmental delay and/or impaired intellectual development, facial dysmorphism, and an increased risk for epilepsy, cardiac defects and additional anatomic anomalies (summary by Sagi-Dain et al., 2019).
Mitochondrial complex 2 deficiency, nuclear type 3
MedGen UID:
1751884
Concept ID:
C5436934
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex II deficiency nuclear type 3 (MC2DN3) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic metabolic disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Some patients may have an encephalomyopathic picture with episodic developmental regression, loss of motor skills, hypotonia, ataxia, dystonia, and seizures or myoclonus. Other patients present in infancy with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which may be fatal. Laboratory studies show increased serum lactate and mitochondrial complex II deficiency in muscle and fibroblasts (summary by Jackson et al., 2014 and Alston et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MC2DN, see MC2DN1 (252011).
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency, nuclear type 22
MedGen UID:
1786100
Concept ID:
C5543491
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex IV deficiency nuclear type 22 (MC4DN22) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by neonatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, encephalopathy, and severe lactic acidosis with fatal outcome (Wintjes et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency, see 220110.
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 9
MedGen UID:
1794176
Concept ID:
C5561966
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome-9 (AGS9) is a type I interferonopathy characterized by severe developmental delay and progressive neurologic deterioration. Patients present in infancy with irritability and spasticity. Brain imaging shows diffusely abnormal white matter, cerebral atrophy, and intracranial calcification. Premature death has been associated with renal and/or hepatic failure (Uggenti et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, see AGS1 (225750).
Mucopolysaccharidosis, type 10
MedGen UID:
1794274
Concept ID:
C5562064
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type X (MPS10) is an autosomal recessive childhood-onset disorder associated with disproportionate short-trunk short stature and skeletal, cardiac, and ophthalmologic abnormalities (Verheyen et al., 2022).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation defect type 30
MedGen UID:
1799028
Concept ID:
C5567605
Disease or Syndrome
A rare mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation disorder with characteristics of neonatal onset of hypotonia, feeding difficulties, deafness, and early fatal respiratory failure. Cardiac and liver involvement has been reported. Serum lactate is increased and metabolic studies show decreased activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes I and IV in skeletal muscle.
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 109
MedGen UID:
1824036
Concept ID:
C5774263
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-109 (DEE109) is characterized by the onset of various types of seizures in the first months or years of life. Affected individuals show developmental delay before and concurrent with the onset of seizures. Features include impaired intellectual development with poor speech, ataxic gait, coordination problems, and behavioral abnormalities (Manivannan et al., 2022). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Tuohy CV, Kaul S, Song HK, Nazer B, Heitner SB
Eur J Heart Fail 2020 Feb;22(2):228-240. Epub 2020 Jan 9 doi: 10.1002/ejhf.1715. PMID: 31919938
Teekakirikul P, Zhu W, Huang HC, Fung E
Biomolecules 2019 Dec 16;9(12) doi: 10.3390/biom9120878. PMID: 31888115Free PMC Article
Flynn JT, Kaelber DC, Baker-Smith CM, Blowey D, Carroll AE, Daniels SR, de Ferranti SD, Dionne JM, Falkner B, Flinn SK, Gidding SS, Goodwin C, Leu MG, Powers ME, Rea C, Samuels J, Simasek M, Thaker VV, Urbina EM; SUBCOMMITTEE ON SCREENING AND MANAGEMENT OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE IN CHILDREN
Pediatrics 2017 Sep;140(3) Epub 2017 Aug 21 doi: 10.1542/peds.2017-1904. PMID: 28827377

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Yildiz M, Oktay AA, Stewart MH, Milani RV, Ventura HO, Lavie CJ
Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2020 Jan-Feb;63(1):10-21. Epub 2019 Nov 21 doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2019.11.009. PMID: 31759953
Grajewski KG, Stojanovska J, Ibrahim EH, Sayyouh M, Attili A
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol 2020 Nov-Dec;49(6):460-475. Epub 2019 Sep 14 doi: 10.1067/j.cpradiol.2019.09.005. PMID: 31630875
Stewart MH, Lavie CJ, Shah S, Englert J, Gilliland Y, Qamruddin S, Dinshaw H, Cash M, Ventura H, Milani R
Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2018 Nov-Dec;61(5-6):446-455. Epub 2018 Nov 6 doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2018.11.002. PMID: 30408469
Shenasa M, Shenasa H
Int J Cardiol 2017 Jun 15;237:60-63. Epub 2017 Mar 3 doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.03.002. PMID: 28285801
Shenasa M, Shenasa H, El-Sherif N
Card Electrophysiol Clin 2015 Jun;7(2):207-20. Epub 2015 Apr 11 doi: 10.1016/j.ccep.2015.03.017. PMID: 26002387

Diagnosis

Bacharova L, Kollarova M, Bezak B, Bohm A
Int J Mol Sci 2023 Feb 15;24(4) doi: 10.3390/ijms24043881. PMID: 36835293Free PMC Article
Yildiz M, Oktay AA, Stewart MH, Milani RV, Ventura HO, Lavie CJ
Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2020 Jan-Feb;63(1):10-21. Epub 2019 Nov 21 doi: 10.1016/j.pcad.2019.11.009. PMID: 31759953
Shenasa M, Shenasa H
Int J Cardiol 2017 Jun 15;237:60-63. Epub 2017 Mar 3 doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.03.002. PMID: 28285801
Collier P, Phelan D, Klein A
J Am Coll Cardiol 2017 Feb 28;69(8):1043-1056. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.12.012. PMID: 28231932
Shenasa M, Shenasa H, El-Sherif N
Card Electrophysiol Clin 2015 Jun;7(2):207-20. Epub 2015 Apr 11 doi: 10.1016/j.ccep.2015.03.017. PMID: 26002387

Therapy

Farrant J, Dodd S, Vaughan C, Reid A, Schmitt M, Garratt C, Akhtar M, Mahmod M, Neubauer S, Cooper RM, Prasad SK, Singh A, Valkovič L, Raman B, Ashkir Z, Clayton D, Baroja O, Duran B, Spowart C, Bedson E, Naish JH, Harrington C, Miller CA; TEMPEST investigators
Heart 2023 Jul 12;109(15):1175-1182. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2022-322271. PMID: 37137675Free PMC Article
Messerli FH, Bangalore S, Bavishi C, Rimoldi SF
J Am Coll Cardiol 2018 Apr 3;71(13):1474-1482. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.01.058. PMID: 29598869
Armstrong PW, Roessig L, Patel MJ, Anstrom KJ, Butler J, Voors AA, Lam CSP, Ponikowski P, Temple T, Pieske B, Ezekowitz J, Hernandez AF, Koglin J, O'Connor CM
JACC Heart Fail 2018 Feb;6(2):96-104. Epub 2017 Oct 11 doi: 10.1016/j.jchf.2017.08.013. PMID: 29032136
Garvey WT, Mechanick JI, Brett EM, Garber AJ, Hurley DL, Jastreboff AM, Nadolsky K, Pessah-Pollack R, Plodkowski R; Reviewers of the AACE/ACE Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines
Endocr Pract 2016 Jul;22 Suppl 3:1-203. Epub 2016 May 24 doi: 10.4158/EP161365.GL. PMID: 27219496
Strauss DG, Selvester RH, Wagner GS
Am J Cardiol 2011 Mar 15;107(6):927-34. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.11.010. PMID: 21376930

Prognosis

Sági B, Késői I, Vas T, Csiky B, Nagy J, Kovács TJ
BMC Nephrol 2022 Aug 16;23(1):285. doi: 10.1186/s12882-022-02909-1. PMID: 35974314Free PMC Article
Seko Y, Kato T, Yamaji Y, Haruna Y, Nakane E, Haruna T, Inoko M
Open Heart 2021 Sep;8(2) doi: 10.1136/openhrt-2021-001765. PMID: 34556560Free PMC Article
Buzzacott P, Anderson G, Tillmans F, Grier JW, Denoble PJ
Diving Hyperb Med 2021 Jun 30;51(2):190-198. doi: 10.28920/dhm51.2.190-198. PMID: 34157735Free PMC Article
Joseph G, Marott JL, Biering-Sørensen T, Johansen MN, Saevereid HA, Nielsen G, Schnohr P, Prescott E, Søgaard P, Mogelvang R
Hypertension 2020 Mar;75(3):693-701. Epub 2019 Dec 30 doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.119.14287. PMID: 31884852
Arnett DK, de las Fuentes L, Broeckel U
Curr Hypertens Rep 2004 Feb;6(1):36-41. doi: 10.1007/s11906-004-0009-5. PMID: 14972088

Clinical prediction guides

Heydari B, Satriano A, Jerosch-Herold M, Kolm P, Kim DY, Cheng K, Choi YL, Antiochos P, White JA, Mahmod M, Chan K, Raman B, Desai MY, Ho CY, Dolman SF, Desvigne-Nickens P, Maron MS, Friedrich MG, Schulz-Menger J, Piechnik SK, Appelbaum E, Weintraub WS, Neubauer S, Kramer CM, Kwong RY; HCMR Investigators
JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 2023 Apr;16(4):478-491. Epub 2022 Dec 14 doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2022.10.005. PMID: 36648040Free PMC Article
Nordin S, Dancy L, Moon JC, Sado DM
Int J Cardiovasc Imaging 2018 Apr;34(4):577-585. Epub 2018 Mar 3 doi: 10.1007/s10554-018-1320-6. PMID: 29500729
Bacharova L, Estes EH
J Electrocardiol 2017 Nov-Dec;50(6):906-908. Epub 2017 Jun 7 doi: 10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2017.06.006. PMID: 28651797
Hensley N, Dietrich J, Nyhan D, Mitter N, Yee MS, Brady M
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Kavey RE
Curr Hypertens Rep 2013 Oct;15(5):453-7. doi: 10.1007/s11906-013-0370-3. PMID: 23893038

Recent systematic reviews

Maron BJ, Desai MY, Nishimura RA, Spirito P, Rakowski H, Towbin JA, Rowin EJ, Maron MS, Sherrid MV
J Am Coll Cardiol 2022 Feb 1;79(4):372-389. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2021.12.002. PMID: 35086660
Leache L, Gutiérrez-Valencia M, Finizola RM, Infante E, Finizola B, Pardo Pardo J, Flores Y, Granero R, Arai KJ
Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2021 Oct 10;10(10):CD012039. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD012039.pub3. PMID: 34628642Free PMC Article
Monticone S, D'Ascenzo F, Moretti C, Williams TA, Veglio F, Gaita F, Mulatero P
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2018 Jan;6(1):41-50. Epub 2017 Nov 9 doi: 10.1016/S2213-8587(17)30319-4. PMID: 29129575
Spoto B, Pisano A, Zoccali C
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2016 Dec 1;311(6):F1087-F1108. Epub 2016 Oct 5 doi: 10.1152/ajprenal.00340.2016. PMID: 27707707
Cuspidi C, Rescaldani M, Sala C, Grassi G
J Hypertens 2014 Jan;32(1):16-25. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e328364fb58. PMID: 24309485

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