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Liver abscess

MedGen UID:
6124
Concept ID:
C0023885
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Abscess, Hepatic; Abscess, Liver; Abscesses, Hepatic; Abscesses, Liver; Hepatic Abscess; Hepatic Abscesses; Liver Abscess; Liver Abscesses
SNOMED CT: Abscess of liver (27916005); Hepatic abscess (27916005)
 
HPO: HP:0100523

Definition

A circumscribed area of pus or necrotic debris in the liver. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

Conditions with this feature

Immunodeficiency 67
MedGen UID:
375137
Concept ID:
C1843256
Disease or Syndrome
Immunodeficiency-67 (IMD67) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent severe systemic and invasive bacterial infections beginning in infancy or early childhood. The most common organisms implicated are Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus; Pseudomonas and atypical Mycobacteria may also be observed. IMD67 is life-threatening in infancy and early childhood. The first invasive infection typically occurs before 2 years of age, with meningitis representing up to 41% of the bacterial infections. The mortality rate in early childhood is high, with most deaths occurring before 8 years of age. Affected individuals have an impaired inflammatory response to infection, including lack of fever and neutropenia, although erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein may be elevated. General immunologic workup tends to be normal, with normal levels of B cells, T cells, and NK cells. However, more detailed studies indicate impaired cytokine response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IL1B (147720) stimulation; response to TNFA (191160) is usually normal. Patients have good antibody responses to most vaccinations, with the notable exception of pneumococcal vaccination. Viral, fungal, and parasitic infections are not generally observed. Early detection is critical in early childhood because prophylactic treatment with IVIg or certain antibiotics is effective; the disorder tends to improve naturally around adolescence. At the molecular level, the disorder results from impaired function of selective Toll receptor (see TLR4, 603030)/IL1R (see IL1R1, 147810) signaling pathways that ultimately activate NFKB (164011) to produce cytokines (summary by Ku et al., 2007; Picard et al., 2010; Grazioli et al., 2016). See also IMD68 (612260), caused by mutation in the MYD88 gene (602170), which shows a similar phenotype to IMD67. As the MYD88 and IRAK4 genes interact in the same intracellular signaling pathway, the clinical and cellular features are almost indistinguishable (summary by Picard et al., 2010).
Granulomatous disease, chronic, X-linked
MedGen UID:
336165
Concept ID:
C1844376
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 2
MedGen UID:
383869
Concept ID:
C1856245
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 1
MedGen UID:
341102
Concept ID:
C1856251
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.
Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-negative
MedGen UID:
383872
Concept ID:
C1856255
Disease or Syndrome
Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Wang H, Xue X
J Int Med Res 2023 Jun;51(6):3000605231180053. doi: 10.1177/03000605231180053. PMID: 37345580Free PMC Article
Brown ZJ, Baghdadi A, Kamel I, Labiner HE, Hewitt DB, Pawlik TM
HPB (Oxford) 2023 Jan;25(1):14-25. Epub 2022 Oct 5 doi: 10.1016/j.hpb.2022.09.010. PMID: 36257874
Khim G, Em S, Mo S, Townell N
Br Med Bull 2019 Dec 11;132(1):45-52. doi: 10.1093/bmb/ldz032. PMID: 31836890Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Wang H, Xue X
J Int Med Res 2023 Jun;51(6):3000605231180053. doi: 10.1177/03000605231180053. PMID: 37345580Free PMC Article
Wang JL, Hsu CR, Wu CY, Lin HH
Sci Rep 2023 May 16;13(1):7922. doi: 10.1038/s41598-023-34889-z. PMID: 37193729Free PMC Article
Gupta S, Smith L, Diakiw A
Pediatr Clin North Am 2022 Feb;69(1):79-97. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2021.08.003. PMID: 34794678
Hughes MA, Petri WA Jr
Infect Dis Clin North Am 2000 Sep;14(3):565-82, viii. doi: 10.1016/s0891-5520(05)70121-5. PMID: 10987110
Fujihara T, Nagai Y, Kubo T, Seki S, Satake K
J Gastroenterol 1996 Oct;31(5):659-63. doi: 10.1007/BF02347613. PMID: 8887031

Diagnosis

Nepal P, Ojili V, Kumar S, Kaur N, Nagar A
Emerg Radiol 2020 Jun;27(3):307-320. Epub 2020 Feb 12 doi: 10.1007/s10140-020-01757-6. PMID: 32052222
Mohidin B, Green SF, Duggineni S
QJM 2018 Nov 1;111(11):821-822. doi: 10.1093/qjmed/hcy105. PMID: 29800351
Wells CD, Arguedas M
South Med J 2004 Jul;97(7):673-82. doi: 10.1097/00007611-200407000-00013. PMID: 15301125
Hughes MA, Petri WA Jr
Infect Dis Clin North Am 2000 Sep;14(3):565-82, viii. doi: 10.1016/s0891-5520(05)70121-5. PMID: 10987110
Johannsen EC, Sifri CD, Madoff LC
Infect Dis Clin North Am 2000 Sep;14(3):547-63, vii. doi: 10.1016/s0891-5520(05)70120-3. PMID: 10987109

Therapy

Roediger R, Lisker-Melman M
Gastroenterol Clin North Am 2020 Jun;49(2):361-377. doi: 10.1016/j.gtc.2020.01.013. PMID: 32389368
Molton JS, Chan M, Kalimuddin S, Oon J, Young BE, Low JG, Salada BMA, Lee TH, Wijaya L, Fisher DA, Izharuddin E, Koh TH, Teo JWP, Krishnan PU, Tan BP, Woon WWL, Ding Y, Wei Y, Phillips R, Moorakonda R, Yuen KH, Cher BP, Yoong J, Lye DC, Archuleta S
Clin Infect Dis 2020 Aug 14;71(4):952-959. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz881. PMID: 31641767
Khim G, Em S, Mo S, Townell N
Br Med Bull 2019 Dec 11;132(1):45-52. doi: 10.1093/bmb/ldz032. PMID: 31836890Free PMC Article
Johannsen EC, Sifri CD, Madoff LC
Infect Dis Clin North Am 2000 Sep;14(3):547-63, vii. doi: 10.1016/s0891-5520(05)70120-3. PMID: 10987109
Fujihara T, Nagai Y, Kubo T, Seki S, Satake K
J Gastroenterol 1996 Oct;31(5):659-63. doi: 10.1007/BF02347613. PMID: 8887031

Prognosis

Wang JL, Hsu CR, Wu CY, Lin HH
Sci Rep 2023 May 16;13(1):7922. doi: 10.1038/s41598-023-34889-z. PMID: 37193729Free PMC Article
Kim E, Byon I, Lee JJ, Seol YM, Kwon HJ, Park SW, Lee JE
Am J Ophthalmol 2023 Aug;252:69-76. Epub 2023 Mar 22 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2023.03.009. PMID: 36963602
Yoon JH, Kim YJ, Kim SI
BMC Infect Dis 2019 May 31;19(1):488. doi: 10.1186/s12879-019-4131-z. PMID: 31151426Free PMC Article
Justo I, Jiménez-Romero C, Manrique A, Caso O, Calvo J, Cambra F, Marcacuzco A
World J Surg 2018 Oct;42(10):3341-3349. doi: 10.1007/s00268-018-4622-x. PMID: 29633100
Sharma MP, Kumar A
Indian J Pediatr 2006 Sep;73(9):813-7. doi: 10.1007/BF02790392. PMID: 17006041

Clinical prediction guides

Namikawa H, Oinuma KI, Yamada K, Kaneko Y, Kakeya H, Shuto T
Int J Antimicrob Agents 2023 May;61(5):106767. Epub 2023 Feb 28 doi: 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2023.106767. PMID: 36858159
Namikawa H, Oinuma KI, Yamada K, Kaneko Y, Kakeya H, Shuto T
J Hosp Infect 2023 Apr;134:153-160. Epub 2023 Feb 21 doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2023.02.005. PMID: 36813165
Leerapun A, Puasripun S, Kijdamrongthum P, Thongsawat S
Hepatol Int 2021 Jun;15(3):804-811. Epub 2021 Apr 17 doi: 10.1007/s12072-021-10180-z. PMID: 33866512
Janda JM, Abbott SL
Clin Microbiol Rev 2021 Mar 17;34(2) Epub 2021 Feb 24 doi: 10.1128/CMR.00174-20. PMID: 33627443Free PMC Article
Zhang S, Zhang X, Wu Q, Zheng X, Dong G, Fang R, Zhang Y, Cao J, Zhou T
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control 2019;8:166. Epub 2019 Oct 29 doi: 10.1186/s13756-019-0615-2. PMID: 31673355Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Lin JW, Chen CT, Hsieh MS, Lee IH, Yen DH, Cheng HM, Hsu TF
BMJ Open 2023 Jul 30;13(7):e072736. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2023-072736. PMID: 37518084Free PMC Article
Namikawa H, Oinuma KI, Yamada K, Kaneko Y, Kakeya H, Shuto T
Int J Antimicrob Agents 2023 May;61(5):106767. Epub 2023 Feb 28 doi: 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2023.106767. PMID: 36858159
Namikawa H, Oinuma KI, Yamada K, Kaneko Y, Kakeya H, Shuto T
J Hosp Infect 2023 Apr;134:153-160. Epub 2023 Feb 21 doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2023.02.005. PMID: 36813165
Al-Sayaghi KM, Alhujaily M, Zaky MK, Alhasan AS, Babikir TB, Alnehmi FS, Abdalrahman HH, Abdelmalik MAA, Ali AM, Fadlalmola HA, Swamy DSV
ANZ J Surg 2023 Apr;93(4):840-850. Epub 2022 Oct 26 doi: 10.1111/ans.18129. PMID: 36285842
Hussain I, Ishrat S, Ho DCW, Khan SR, Veeraraghavan MA, Palraj BR, Molton JS, Abid MB
Int J Infect Dis 2020 Dec;101:259-268. Epub 2020 Oct 6 doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2020.09.1485. PMID: 33035676

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