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Fibroadenoma of the breast

MedGen UID:
64231
Concept ID:
C0178421
Neoplastic Process
Synonym: Breast fibroadenoma
SNOMED CT: Breast mouse (254845004); Fibroadenoma of breast (254845004); Benign fibroadenoma (1156873009)
 
HPO: HP:0010619
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0002056

Definition

A benign biphasic tumor of the breast with epithelial and stromal components. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVFibroadenoma of the breast

Conditions with this feature

PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome with granular cell tumor
MedGen UID:
400984
Concept ID:
C1866376
Neoplastic Process
Familial adenomatous polyposis 1
MedGen UID:
398651
Concept ID:
C2713442
Disease or Syndrome
APC-associated polyposis conditions include (classic or attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS). FAP is a colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition syndrome that can manifest in either classic or attenuated form. Classic FAP is characterized by hundreds to thousands of adenomatous colonic polyps, beginning on average at age 16 years (range 7-36 years). For those with the classic form of FAP, 95% of individuals have polyps by age 35 years; CRC is inevitable without colectomy. The mean age of CRC diagnosis in untreated individuals is 39 years (range 34-43 years). The attenuated form is characterized by multiple colonic polyps (average of 30), more proximally located polyps, and a diagnosis of CRC at a later age than in classic FAP. For those with an attenuated form, there is a 70% lifetime risk of CRC and the mean age of diagnosis is 50-55 years. Extracolonic manifestations are variably present and include polyps of the stomach and duodenum, osteomas, dental abnormalities, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), benign cutaneous lesions, desmoid tumors, adrenal masses, and other associated cancers. GAPPS is characterized by proximal gastric polyposis, increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, and no duodenal or colonic involvement in most individuals reported.
Cowden syndrome 6
MedGen UID:
767433
Concept ID:
C3554519
Disease or Syndrome
\n\nThe features of Cowden syndrome overlap with those of another disorder called Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome. People with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome also develop hamartomas and other noncancerous tumors.  Some people with Cowden syndrome have relatives diagnosed with Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, and other affected individuals have the characteristic features of both conditions. Based on these similarities, researchers have proposed that Cowden syndrome and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome represent a spectrum of overlapping features known as PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (named for the genetic cause of the conditions) instead of two distinct conditions.\n\nSome people do not meet the strict criteria for a clinical diagnosis of Cowden syndrome, but they have some of the characteristic features of the condition, particularly the cancers. These individuals are often described as having Cowden-like syndrome. Both Cowden syndrome and Cowden-like syndrome are caused by mutations in the same genes.\n\nCowden syndrome is associated with an increased risk of developing several types of cancer, particularly cancers of the breast, a gland in the lower neck called the thyroid, and the lining of the uterus (the endometrium). Other cancers that have been identified in people with Cowden syndrome include kidney cancer, colorectal cancer, and an agressive form of skin cancer called melanoma. Compared with the general population, people with Cowden syndrome develop these cancers at younger ages, often beginning in their thirties or forties. People with Cowden syndrome are also more likely to develop more than one cancer during their lifetimes compared to the general population. Other diseases of the breast, thyroid, and endometrium are also common in Cowden syndrome. Additional signs and symptoms can include an enlarged head (macrocephaly) and a rare, noncancerous brain tumor called Lhermitte-Duclos disease. A small percentage of affected individuals have delayed development, intellectual disability, or autism spectrum disorder, which can affect communication and social interaction.\n\nAlmost everyone with Cowden syndrome develops hamartomas. These growths are most commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes (such as the lining of the mouth and nose), but they can also occur in the intestine and other parts of the body. The growth of hamartomas on the skin and mucous membranes typically becomes apparent by a person's late twenties.\n\nCowden syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by multiple noncancerous, tumor-like growths called hamartomas and an increased risk of developing certain cancers.
Multiple fibroadenoma of the breast
MedGen UID:
816248
Concept ID:
C3809918
Neoplastic Process
Fibroadenoma represents a benign breast disease characterized by lobuloalveolar growth with abnormally high proliferation of the epithelium. Patients with more than 3 fibroadenomas in 1 breast are considered to have multiple fibroadenomas (summary by Bogorad et al., 2008).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

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Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Elnahas W, Metwally IH, Bonna K, Youssef M, AbdAllah S, Bonna M, Ali Faried M, Atef Tira M, Hamdy O
Breast Dis 2022;41(1):421-426. doi: 10.3233/BD-210074. PMID: 36565097
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Diagnosis

Elnahas W, Metwally IH, Bonna K, Youssef M, AbdAllah S, Bonna M, Ali Faried M, Atef Tira M, Hamdy O
Breast Dis 2022;41(1):421-426. doi: 10.3233/BD-210074. PMID: 36565097
Dasgupta R, Rajak TK, Kaushal S, Ritolia N
Afr J Paediatr Surg 2022 Oct-Dec;19(4):271-273. doi: 10.4103/ajps.ajps_75_21. PMID: 36018214Free PMC Article
Erickson LA, Chen B
Mayo Clin Proc 2020 Nov;95(11):2573-2574. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2020.08.040. PMID: 33153651
Islam S, Saroop S, Bheem V, Naraynsingh V
BMJ Case Rep 2019 Jan 28;12(1) doi: 10.1136/bcr-2018-227277. PMID: 30696639Free PMC Article
Houssami N, Cheung MN, Dixon JM
Med J Aust 2001 Feb 19;174(4):185-8. doi: 10.5694/j.1326-5377.2001.tb143215.x. PMID: 11270760

Therapy

Lima MA, da Silva BB
Arch Gynecol Obstet 2012 Jan;285(1):223-7. Epub 2011 May 15 doi: 10.1007/s00404-011-1932-8. PMID: 21573987
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Prognosis

Elnahas W, Metwally IH, Bonna K, Youssef M, AbdAllah S, Bonna M, Ali Faried M, Atef Tira M, Hamdy O
Breast Dis 2022;41(1):421-426. doi: 10.3233/BD-210074. PMID: 36565097
Li J, Li P, Li J, Yang H, Liu G, Shen P, Jiang G
Genet Test Mol Biomarkers 2022 Sep;26(9):422-429. doi: 10.1089/gtmb.2021.0304. PMID: 36166741
Mustață L, Gică N, Botezatu R, Chirculescu R, Gică C, Peltecu G, Panaitescu AM
Medicina (Kaunas) 2021 Dec 26;58(1) doi: 10.3390/medicina58010036. PMID: 35056344Free PMC Article
Durak MG, Karaman I, Canda T, Balci P, Harmancioğlu O
Turk Patoloji Derg 2011;27(3):254-6. doi: 10.5146/tjpath.2011.01084. PMID: 21935877
Alle KM, Moss J, Venegas RJ, Khalkhali I, Klein SR
Br J Surg 1996 Jul;83(7):992-3. doi: 10.1002/bjs.1800830735. PMID: 8813797

Clinical prediction guides

Elnahas W, Metwally IH, Bonna K, Youssef M, AbdAllah S, Bonna M, Ali Faried M, Atef Tira M, Hamdy O
Breast Dis 2022;41(1):421-426. doi: 10.3233/BD-210074. PMID: 36565097
Li J, Li P, Li J, Yang H, Liu G, Shen P, Jiang G
Genet Test Mol Biomarkers 2022 Sep;26(9):422-429. doi: 10.1089/gtmb.2021.0304. PMID: 36166741
Chen K, Wang X, Li D, Luo W, Xue C, Kong Y
J Healthc Eng 2022;2022:3642799. Epub 2022 Mar 8 doi: 10.1155/2022/3642799. PMID: 35299679Free PMC Article
Huang IC, Li PC, Ding DC
Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 May;97(20):e10765. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010765. PMID: 29768365Free PMC Article
Durak MG, Karaman I, Canda T, Balci P, Harmancioğlu O
Turk Patoloji Derg 2011;27(3):254-6. doi: 10.5146/tjpath.2011.01084. PMID: 21935877

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