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Subdural hemorrhage

MedGen UID:
6775
Concept ID:
C0018946
Pathologic Function
Synonyms: Hematoma, Subdural; Hematomas, Subdural; Hemorrhage, Subdural; Hemorrhages, Subdural; Subdural Hematoma; Subdural Hematomas; Subdural Hemorrhage; Subdural Hemorrhages
SNOMED CT: SDH - Subdural hematoma (95453001); Subdural hematoma (95453001); Subdural intracranial hemorrhage (35486000); Subdural intracranial hematoma (95453001); Subdural hemorrhage (35486000)
 
HPO: HP:0100309

Definition

Hemorrhage occurring between the dura mater and the arachnoid mater. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Glanzmann thrombasthenia
MedGen UID:
52736
Concept ID:
C0040015
Disease or Syndrome
Glanzmann thrombasthenia is a bleeding disorder that is characterized by prolonged or spontaneous bleeding starting from birth. People with Glanzmann thrombasthenia tend to bruise easily, have frequent nosebleeds (epistaxis), and may bleed from the gums. They may also develop red or purple spots on the skin caused by bleeding underneath the skin (petechiae) or swelling caused by bleeding within tissues (hematoma). Glanzmann thrombasthenia can also cause prolonged bleeding following injury, trauma, or surgery (including dental work). Women with this condition can have prolonged and sometimes abnormally heavy menstrual bleeding. Affected women also have an increased risk of excessive blood loss during pregnancy and childbirth.\n\nAbout a quarter of individuals with Glanzmann thrombasthenia have bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract, which often occurs later in life. Rarely, affected individuals have bleeding inside the skull (intracranial hemorrhage) or joints (hemarthrosis).\n\nThe severity and frequency of the bleeding episodes in Glanzmann thrombasthenia can vary greatly among affected individuals, even in the same family. Spontaneous bleeding tends to become less frequent with age.
TARP syndrome
MedGen UID:
333324
Concept ID:
C1839463
Disease or Syndrome
The classic features of TARP syndrome are talipes equinovarus, atrial septal defect, Robin sequence (micrognathia, cleft palate, and glossoptosis), and persistent left superior vena cava. Not all patients have all classic features. Some patients have the additional features of central nervous system dysfunction, renal abnormalities, variable cardiac anomalies including hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and variable distal limb defects including syndactyly. Most patients die in late prenatal or early postnatal stages (summary by Kaeppler et al., 2018).
Congenital afibrinogenemia
MedGen UID:
749036
Concept ID:
C2584774
Disease or Syndrome
Inherited disorders of fibrinogen affect either the quantity (afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia; 202400) or the quality (dysfibrinogenemia; 616004) of the circulating fibrinogen or both (hypodysfibrinogenemia; see 616004). Afibrinogenemia is characterized by the complete absence of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Bleeding due to afibrinogenemia usually manifests in the neonatal period, with 85% of cases presenting umbilical cord bleeding, but a later age of onst is not unusual. Bleeding may occur in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or the central nervous system, with intracranial hemorrhage being reported as the major cause of death. Patients are susceptible to spontaneous rupture of the spleen. Menstruating women may experience menometrorrhagia. First-trimester abortion is common. Both arterial and venous thromboembolic complications have been reported (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). Hypofibrinogenemia is characterized by reduced amounts of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Patients are often heterozygous carriers of afibrinogenemia mutations and are usually asymptomatic. However, they may bleed when exposed to trauma or if they have a second associated hemostatic abnormality. Women may experience miscarriages. Liver disease occurs in rare cases (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009).
Fetal akinesia-cerebral and retinal hemorrhage syndrome
MedGen UID:
1631944
Concept ID:
C4706410
Disease or Syndrome
A rare lethal congenital myopathy syndrome characterized by decreased fetal movements and polyhydramnios in utero and the presence of akinesia, severe hypotonia with respiratory insufficiency, absent reflexes, joint contractures, skeletal abnormalities with thin ribs and bones, intracranial and retinal hemorrhages and decreased birth weight in the neonate.
Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity-predominant, 2b, prenatal onset, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1648362
Concept ID:
C4749003
Disease or Syndrome
SMALED2B is a severe neuromuscular disorder with onset in utero. Affected individuals show decreased fetal movements and are usually born with congenital contractures consistent with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). After birth, they have severe hypotonia and muscle atrophy as well as respiratory insufficiency due to muscle weakness. Some patients may have dysmorphic facial features and/or abnormalities on brain imaging. Many patients die in early childhood (summary by Storbeck et al., 2017) For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lower extremity-predominant spinal muscular atrophy, see SMALED1 (158600).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation, type Iw, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1794278
Concept ID:
C5562068
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant congenital disorder of glycosylation type Iw (CDG1WAD) is characterized by variable skeletal anomalies, short stature, macrocephaly, and dysmorphic features; about half of patients have impaired intellectual development. Additional features include increased muscle tone and muscle cramps (Wilson et al., 2021).
Congenital myopathy 2c, severe infantile, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1840969
Concept ID:
C5830333
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital myopathy-2C (CMYP2C) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the skeletal muscle characterized by severe congenital weakness usually resulting in death from respiratory failure in the first year or so of life. Patients present at birth with hypotonia, lack of antigravity movements, poor head control, and difficulties feeding or breathing, often requiring tube-feeding and mechanical ventilation. Decreased fetal movements may be observed in some cases. Of the patients with congenital myopathy caused by mutation in the ACTA1 gene, about 90% carry heterozygous mutations that are usually de novo and cause the severe infantile phenotype. Some patients with heterozygous mutations have a more typical and milder disease course with delayed motor development and proximal muscle weakness, but are able to achieve independent ambulation (CMYP2A; 161800). The severity of the disease most likely depends on the detrimental effect of the mutation, although there are probably additional modifying factors (Ryan et al., 2001; Laing et al., 2009; Sanoudou and Beggs, 2001; Agrawal et al., 2004; Nowak et al., 2013; Sewry et al., 2019; Laitila and Wallgren-Pettersson, 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital myopathy, see CMYP1A (117000).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Duhaime AC, Christian CW
J Neurosurg Pediatr 2019 Nov 1;24(5):481-488. doi: 10.3171/2019.7.PEDS18394. PMID: 31675688
Macdonald RL
Neurosurg Clin N Am 2018 Oct;29(4):605-613. Epub 2018 Aug 14 doi: 10.1016/j.nec.2018.06.013. PMID: 30223973
Choudhary AK, Servaes S, Slovis TL, Palusci VJ, Hedlund GL, Narang SK, Moreno JA, Dias MS, Christian CW, Nelson MD Jr, Silvera VM, Palasis S, Raissaki M, Rossi A, Offiah AC
Pediatr Radiol 2018 Aug;48(8):1048-1065. Epub 2018 May 23 doi: 10.1007/s00247-018-4149-1. PMID: 29796797

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Laing J, Gabbe B, Chen Z, Perucca P, Kwan P, O'Brien TJ
JAMA Neurol 2022 Apr 1;79(4):334-341. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2021.5420. PMID: 35188950Free PMC Article
de Faria JL, da Silva Brito J, Costa E Silva LT, Kilesse CTSM, de Souza NB, Pereira CU, Figueiredo EG, Rabelo NN
Neurosurg Rev 2021 Jun;44(3):1287-1298. Epub 2020 Jun 17 doi: 10.1007/s10143-020-01324-0. PMID: 32556832
Lynøe N, Eriksson A
Med Hypotheses 2020 Nov;144:110256. Epub 2020 Sep 11 doi: 10.1016/j.mehy.2020.110256. PMID: 33254567
Caton MT Jr, Wiggins WF, Nuñez D
Emerg Radiol 2019 Oct;26(5):567-571. Epub 2019 Apr 29 doi: 10.1007/s10140-019-01691-2. PMID: 31037589
Macdonald RL
Neurosurg Clin N Am 2018 Oct;29(4):605-613. Epub 2018 Aug 14 doi: 10.1016/j.nec.2018.06.013. PMID: 30223973

Diagnosis

Laing J, Gabbe B, Chen Z, Perucca P, Kwan P, O'Brien TJ
JAMA Neurol 2022 Apr 1;79(4):334-341. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2021.5420. PMID: 35188950Free PMC Article
Caré MM
Pediatr Radiol 2021 May;51(6):891-897. Epub 2021 May 17 doi: 10.1007/s00247-020-04848-1. PMID: 33999235
Choudhary AK, Servaes S, Slovis TL, Palusci VJ, Hedlund GL, Narang SK, Moreno JA, Dias MS, Christian CW, Nelson MD Jr, Silvera VM, Palasis S, Raissaki M, Rossi A, Offiah AC
Pediatr Radiol 2018 Aug;48(8):1048-1065. Epub 2018 May 23 doi: 10.1007/s00247-018-4149-1. PMID: 29796797
Shaban A, Moritani T, Al Kasab S, Sheharyar A, Limaye KS, Adams HP Jr
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2018 Jun;27(6):1435-1446. Epub 2018 Mar 16 doi: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2018.02.014. PMID: 29555403
Mian M, Shah J, Dalpiaz A, Schwamb R, Miao Y, Warren K, Khan S
Fetal Pediatr Pathol 2015 Jun;34(3):169-75. Epub 2015 Jan 23 doi: 10.3109/15513815.2014.999394. PMID: 25616019

Therapy

Rivier CA, Kamel H, Sheth KN, Iadecola C, Gupta A, de Leon MJ, Ross E, Falcone GJ, Murthy SB
JAMA Neurol 2024 Feb 1;81(2):163-169. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2023.4918. PMID: 38147345Free PMC Article
Ryu HS, Hong JH, Kim YS, Kim TS, Joo SP
Medicine (Baltimore) 2022 Nov 18;101(46):e31621. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000031621. PMID: 36401411Free PMC Article
de Faria JL, da Silva Brito J, Costa E Silva LT, Kilesse CTSM, de Souza NB, Pereira CU, Figueiredo EG, Rabelo NN
Neurosurg Rev 2021 Jun;44(3):1287-1298. Epub 2020 Jun 17 doi: 10.1007/s10143-020-01324-0. PMID: 32556832
Ebrahimi P, Mozafari J, Ilkhchi RB, Hanafi MG, Mousavinejad M
Rev Recent Clin Trials 2019;14(4):286-291. doi: 10.2174/1574887114666190620112829. PMID: 31218964
Macdonald RL
Neurosurg Clin N Am 2018 Oct;29(4):605-613. Epub 2018 Aug 14 doi: 10.1016/j.nec.2018.06.013. PMID: 30223973

Prognosis

Agashe S, Brinkmann BH, Cox BC, Wong-Kisiel L, Van Gompel JJ, Marsh RW, Miller KJ, Krecke KN, Britton JW
Clin Neurophysiol 2023 Nov;155:86-93. Epub 2023 Sep 6 doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2023.08.016. PMID: 37806180
Laing J, Gabbe B, Chen Z, Perucca P, Kwan P, O'Brien TJ
JAMA Neurol 2022 Apr 1;79(4):334-341. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2021.5420. PMID: 35188950Free PMC Article
Shaban A, Moritani T, Al Kasab S, Sheharyar A, Limaye KS, Adams HP Jr
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2018 Jun;27(6):1435-1446. Epub 2018 Mar 16 doi: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2018.02.014. PMID: 29555403
Wright JN
AJR Am J Roentgenol 2017 May;208(5):991-1001. Epub 2017 Feb 28 doi: 10.2214/AJR.16.17602. PMID: 28245144
Mian M, Shah J, Dalpiaz A, Schwamb R, Miao Y, Warren K, Khan S
Fetal Pediatr Pathol 2015 Jun;34(3):169-75. Epub 2015 Jan 23 doi: 10.3109/15513815.2014.999394. PMID: 25616019

Clinical prediction guides

Laing J, Gabbe B, Chen Z, Perucca P, Kwan P, O'Brien TJ
JAMA Neurol 2022 Apr 1;79(4):334-341. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2021.5420. PMID: 35188950Free PMC Article
Nikam RM, Kandula VV, Yue X, Krishnan V, Kumbhar SS, Averill LW, Paudyal B, Choudhary AK
Pediatr Radiol 2021 May;51(6):939-946. Epub 2021 Apr 8 doi: 10.1007/s00247-021-05060-5. PMID: 33830289
Murthy SB, Wu X, Diaz I, Parasram M, Parikh NS, Iadecola C, Merkler AE, Falcone GJ, Brown S, Biffi A, Ch'ang J, Knopman J, Stieg PE, Navi BB, Sheth KN, Kamel H
Stroke 2020 May;51(5):1464-1469. Epub 2020 Mar 17 doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.119.028510. PMID: 32178587Free PMC Article
Wright JN, Feyma TJ, Ishak GE, Abeshaus S, Metz JB, Brown ECB, Friedman SD, Browd SR, Feldman KW
Pediatr Radiol 2019 Dec;49(13):1762-1772. Epub 2019 Nov 19 doi: 10.1007/s00247-019-04483-5. PMID: 31745619
Chaitanya K, Addanki A, Karambelkar R, Ranjan R
Childs Nerv Syst 2018 Jun;34(6):1119-1123. Epub 2018 Mar 29 doi: 10.1007/s00381-018-3784-z. PMID: 29594463

Recent systematic reviews

Habibi MA, Kobets AJ, Boskabadi AR, Mousavi Nasab M, Sobhanian P, Saber Hamishegi F, Naseri Alavi SA
Neurosurg Rev 2024 Feb 10;47(1):77. doi: 10.1007/s10143-024-02292-5. PMID: 38336894Free PMC Article
Phan K, Abi-Hanna D, Kerferd J, Lu VM, Dmytriw AA, Ho YT, Fairhall J, Reddy R, Wilson P
World Neurosurg 2018 Jan;109:e792-e799. Epub 2017 Oct 26 doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2017.10.091. PMID: 29107160
Anker-Møller T, Troldborg A, Sunde N, Hvas AM
Semin Thromb Hemost 2017 Oct;43(7):750-758. Epub 2017 Sep 6 doi: 10.1055/s-0037-1604089. PMID: 28877540
Xu T, Yu X, Ou S, Liu X, Yuan J, Huang H, Yang J, He L, Chen Y
Epilepsy Behav 2017 Feb;67:1-6. Epub 2017 Jan 8 doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2016.10.026. PMID: 28076834
Piteau SJ, Ward MG, Barrowman NJ, Plint AC
Pediatrics 2012 Aug;130(2):315-23. Epub 2012 Jul 9 doi: 10.1542/peds.2011-1545. PMID: 22778309

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