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Exudative vitreoretinopathy

MedGen UID:
892913
Concept ID:
C4072980
Disease or Syndrome
HPO: HP:0030490

Conditions with this feature

Wagner syndrome
MedGen UID:
326741
Concept ID:
C1840452
Disease or Syndrome
VCAN-related vitreoretinopathy, which includes Wagner syndrome and erosive vitreoretinopathy (ERVR), is characterized by "optically empty vitreous" on slit-lamp examination and avascular vitreous strands and veils, mild or occasionally moderate to severe myopia, presenile cataract, night blindness of variable degree associated with progressive chorioretinal atrophy, retinal traction and retinal detachment in the advanced stages of disease, and reduced visual acuity. Optic nerve inversion as well as uveitis has also been described. Systemic abnormalities are not observed. The first signs usually become apparent during early adolescence, but onset can be as early as age two years.
Exudative vitreoretinopathy 2, X-linked
MedGen UID:
337030
Concept ID:
C1844579
Disease or Syndrome
Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Its clinical appearance varies considerably, even within families, with severely affected patients often registered as blind during infancy, whereas mildly affected patients with few or no visual problems may have such a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina that it is visible only by fluorescein angiography. It is believed that this peripheral avascularity is the primary anomaly in FEVR and results from defective retinal angiogenesis. The sight-threatening features of the FEVR phenotype are considered secondary to retinal avascularity and develop because of the resulting retinal ischemia; they include the development of hyperpermeable blood vessels, neovascularization, vitreoretinal traction, retinal folds, and retinal detachments (summary by Poulter et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FEVR, see EVR1 (133780).
Exudative vitreoretinopathy 1
MedGen UID:
343561
Concept ID:
C1851402
Disease or Syndrome
Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Its clinical appearance varies considerably, even within families, with severely affected patients often registered as blind during infancy, whereas mildly affected patients with few or no visual problems may have such a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina that it is visible only by fluorescein angiography. It is believed that this peripheral avascularity is the primary anomaly in FEVR and results from defective retinal angiogenesis. The sight-threatening features of the FEVR phenotype are considered secondary to retinal avascularity and develop because of the resulting retinal ischemia; they include the development of hyperpermeable blood vessels, neovascularization, vitreoretinal traction, retinal folds, and retinal detachments (summary by Poulter et al., 2010). In 31 Chinese pedigrees clinically diagnosed with FEVR, Rao et al. (2017) analyzed 6 FEVR-associated genes and identified mutations in 12 of the probands, including 5 (16.1%) in LRP5, 3 (9.7%) in NDP, 2 (6.5%) in FZD4, and 1 (3.2%) in TSPAN12. In addition, a mutation in the KIF11 gene (148760) was identified in a patient who also exhibited microcephaly (MCLMR; 152950). The authors noted that their detection rate did not exceed 50%, suggesting that other FEVR-associated genes remained to be discovered. Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy Also see EVR2 (305390), caused by mutation in the NDP gene (300658) on chromosome Xp11; EVR3 (605750), mapped to 11p13-p12; EVR4 (601813), caused by mutations in the LRP5 gene (603506) on 11q13.4; EVR5 (613310), caused by mutation in the TSPAN12 gene (613138) on 7q31; EVR6 (616468), caused by mutation in the ZNF408 gene (616454) on 11p11; and EVR7 (617572), caused by mutation in the CTNNB1 gene (116806) on chromosome 3p22.
Exudative vitreoretinopathy 3
MedGen UID:
344184
Concept ID:
C1854002
Disease or Syndrome
Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Its clinical appearance varies considerably, even within families, with severely affected patients often registered as blind during infancy, whereas mildly affected patients with few or no visual problems may have such a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina that it is visible only by fluorescein angiography. It is believed that this peripheral avascularity is the primary anomaly in FEVR and results from defective retinal angiogenesis. The sight-threatening features of the FEVR phenotype are considered secondary to retinal avascularity and develop because of the resulting retinal ischemia; they include the development of hyperpermeable blood vessels, neovascularization, vitreoretinal traction, retinal folds, and retinal detachments (summary by Poulter et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, see EVR1 (133780).
Exudative vitreoretinopathy 4
MedGen UID:
356171
Concept ID:
C1866176
Disease or Syndrome
Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is an inherited disorder characterized by the incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Its clinical appearance varies considerably, even within families, with severely affected patients often registered as blind during infancy, whereas mildly affected patients with few or no visual problems may have such a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina that it is visible only by fluorescein angiography. It is believed that this peripheral avascularity is the primary anomaly in FEVR and results from defective retinal angiogenesis. The sight-threatening features of the FEVR phenotype are considered secondary to retinal avascularity and develop because of the resulting retinal ischemia; they include the development of hyperpermeable blood vessels, neovascularization, vitreoretinal traction, retinal folds, and retinal detachments (summary by Poulter et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, see EVR1 (133780).
Exudative vitreoretinopathy 5
MedGen UID:
412872
Concept ID:
C2750079
Disease or Syndrome
Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy is an inherited blinding disorder caused by defects in the development of retinal vasculature. There is extensive variation in disease severity among patients, even between members of the same family. Severely affected individuals often are registered as blind during infancy and can present with a phenotype resembling retinal dysplasia. Conversely, mildly affected individuals frequently have few or no visual problems and may have just a small area of avascularity in their peripheral retina, detectable only by fluorescein angiography (summary by Poulter et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), see EVR1 (133780).
Severe intellectual disability-progressive spastic diplegia syndrome
MedGen UID:
767363
Concept ID:
C3554449
Disease or Syndrome
CTNNB1 neurodevelopmental disorder (CTNNB1-NDD) is characterized in all individuals by mild-to-profound cognitive impairment and in up to 39% of reported individuals by exudative vitreoretinopathy, an ophthalmologic finding consistent with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Other common findings include truncal hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, dystonia, behavior problems, microcephaly, and refractive errors and strabismus. Less common features include intrauterine growth restriction, feeding difficulties, and scoliosis.
Exudative vitreoretinopathy 6
MedGen UID:
902559
Concept ID:
C4225316
Disease or Syndrome
Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy is a hereditary disorder that can cause vision loss that worsens over time. This condition affects the retina, the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye. In people with this disorder, blood vessels do not fully develop at the outer edges (periphery) of the retina, which reduces the blood supply to this tissue. This prolonged reduction in blood supply (chronic ischemia) causes continued damage to the retina and can lead to worsening of the condition. \n\nThe signs and symptoms of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy vary widely, even within the same family. In many affected individuals, the retinal abnormalities never cause any vision problems. Other people with this condition develop abnormal vessels that leak. This  causes chronic inflammation which, over time, can lead to fluid under the retina (exudate). A reduction in the retina's blood supply causes the retina to fold, tear, or separate from the back of the eye (retinal detachment). The resulting retinal damage can lead to vision loss and blindness. Other eye abnormalities are also possible, including eyes that do not look in the same direction (strabismus) and a visible whiteness (leukocoria) in the normally black pupil.\n\nSome people with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy also have a condition known as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome, which is characterized by reduced bone density. People with this condition have weakened bones and an increased risk of fractures.
Exudative vitreoretinopathy 7
MedGen UID:
1626650
Concept ID:
C4539767
Disease or Syndrome
Kury-Isidor syndrome
MedGen UID:
1807460
Concept ID:
C5676925
Disease or Syndrome
Kury-Isidor syndrome (KURIS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a highly variable phenotype. It is characterized mainly by mild global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood with walking delayed by a few years and speech delay, often with language deficits. Intellectual development may be mildly delayed, borderline, or even normal; most patients have behavioral problems, including autism. Additional variable systemic features may include poor overall growth, hypotonia, distal skeletal anomalies, seizures, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features (summary by Kury et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Dumbrăveanu L, Cușnir V, Bobescu D
Rom J Ophthalmol 2021 Oct-Dec;65(4):315-329. doi: 10.22336/rjo.2021.66. PMID: 35087972Free PMC Article
Moinuddin O, Sathrasala S, Jayasundera KT, Branham KH, Chang EY, Qian CX, Recchia FM, Fahim AT, Besirli CG
Ophthalmol Retina 2021 Jan;5(1):86-96. Epub 2020 Apr 9 doi: 10.1016/j.oret.2020.03.026. PMID: 32507488Free PMC Article
Tauqeer Z, Yonekawa Y
Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila) 2018 May-Jun;7(3):176-182. Epub 2018 Apr 9 doi: 10.22608/APO.201855. PMID: 29633588

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Dumbrăveanu L, Cușnir V, Bobescu D
Rom J Ophthalmol 2021 Oct-Dec;65(4):315-329. doi: 10.22336/rjo.2021.66. PMID: 35087972Free PMC Article
Tao T, Xu N, Li J, Li H, Qu J, Yin H, Liang J, Zhao M, Li X, Huang L
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2021 Dec 1;62(15):4. doi: 10.1167/iovs.62.15.4. PMID: 34860240Free PMC Article
Moinuddin O, Sathrasala S, Jayasundera KT, Branham KH, Chang EY, Qian CX, Recchia FM, Fahim AT, Besirli CG
Ophthalmol Retina 2021 Jan;5(1):86-96. Epub 2020 Apr 9 doi: 10.1016/j.oret.2020.03.026. PMID: 32507488Free PMC Article
Rao P, Lertjirachai I, Yonekawa Y, Hasbrook M, Thomas BJ, Wood EH, Mehta N, Mane G, Drenser KA, Trese MT, Capone A Jr
Retina 2020 Jul;40(7):1367-1373. doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000002623. PMID: 31404032
Gilmour DF
Eye (Lond) 2015 Jan;29(1):1-14. Epub 2014 Oct 17 doi: 10.1038/eye.2014.70. PMID: 25323851Free PMC Article

Diagnosis

Özdek Ş, Özdemir Zeydanlı E, Baumal C, Hoyek S, Patel N, Berrocal A, Lopez-Cañizares A, Al-Khersan H, Kusaka S, Mano F, Jalali S, Lepore D, Akar S
Turk J Ophthalmol 2023 Feb 24;53(1):44-57. doi: 10.4274/tjo.galenos.2022.76436. PMID: 36847634Free PMC Article
Dumbrăveanu L, Cușnir V, Bobescu D
Rom J Ophthalmol 2021 Oct-Dec;65(4):315-329. doi: 10.22336/rjo.2021.66. PMID: 35087972Free PMC Article
Tao T, Xu N, Li J, Li H, Qu J, Yin H, Liang J, Zhao M, Li X, Huang L
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 2021 Dec 1;62(15):4. doi: 10.1167/iovs.62.15.4. PMID: 34860240Free PMC Article
De Silva SR, Arno G, Robson AG, Fakin A, Pontikos N, Mohamed MD, Bird AC, Moore AT, Michaelides M, Webster AR, Mahroo OA
Prog Retin Eye Res 2021 May;82:100898. Epub 2020 Aug 26 doi: 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2020.100898. PMID: 32860923
Tauqeer Z, Yonekawa Y
Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila) 2018 May-Jun;7(3):176-182. Epub 2018 Apr 9 doi: 10.22608/APO.201855. PMID: 29633588

Therapy

Dumbrăveanu L, Cușnir V, Bobescu D
Rom J Ophthalmol 2021 Oct-Dec;65(4):315-329. doi: 10.22336/rjo.2021.66. PMID: 35087972Free PMC Article
Lyu J, Zhang Q, Xu Y, Zhang X, Fei P, Zhao P
Retina 2021 Sep 1;41(9):1976-1985. doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000003122. PMID: 34432746Free PMC Article
Belin PJ, Lee AC, Greaves G, Kosoy J, Lieberman RM
Eur J Ophthalmol 2019 May;29(3):338-347. Epub 2019 Feb 13 doi: 10.1177/1120672119827773. PMID: 30757919
Shields CL, Fulco EM, Arias JD, Alarcon C, Pellegrini M, Rishi P, Kaliki S, Bianciotto CG, Shields JA
Eye (Lond) 2013 Feb;27(2):253-64. Epub 2012 Sep 21 doi: 10.1038/eye.2012.175. PMID: 22995941Free PMC Article
Young TL
Curr Opin Ophthalmol 2003 Oct;14(5):296-303. doi: 10.1097/00055735-200310000-00011. PMID: 14502058

Prognosis

Kitic N, Chapron T, Metge-Galatoire F, Chehaibou I, Caputo G, Abdelmassih Y
Retina 2024 Apr 1;44(4):669-679. doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000004005. PMID: 37973048
Dumbrăveanu L, Cușnir V, Bobescu D
Rom J Ophthalmol 2021 Oct-Dec;65(4):315-329. doi: 10.22336/rjo.2021.66. PMID: 35087972Free PMC Article
Abikoye TM, Idowu OO, Oluleye TS
Int J Clin Pract 2021 Dec;75(12):e14911. Epub 2021 Sep 26 doi: 10.1111/ijcp.14911. PMID: 34551184
Moinuddin O, Sathrasala S, Jayasundera KT, Branham KH, Chang EY, Qian CX, Recchia FM, Fahim AT, Besirli CG
Ophthalmol Retina 2021 Jan;5(1):86-96. Epub 2020 Apr 9 doi: 10.1016/j.oret.2020.03.026. PMID: 32507488Free PMC Article
Benson WE
Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 1995;93:473-521. PMID: 8719692Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Wang Y, Lai Y, Jiang Z, Li S, Ding X
Exp Eye Res 2023 Sep;234:109574. Epub 2023 Jul 12 doi: 10.1016/j.exer.2023.109574. PMID: 37451565
Yang M, Li S, Huang L, Zhao R, Dai E, Jiang X, He Y, Lu J, Peng L, Liu W, Zhang Z, Jiang D, Zhang Y, Jiang Z, Yang Y, Zhao P, Zhu X, Ding X, Yang Z
JCI Insight 2022 Jul 22;7(14) doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.158428. PMID: 35700046Free PMC Article
Abikoye TM, Idowu OO, Oluleye TS
Int J Clin Pract 2021 Dec;75(12):e14911. Epub 2021 Sep 26 doi: 10.1111/ijcp.14911. PMID: 34551184
Moinuddin O, Sathrasala S, Jayasundera KT, Branham KH, Chang EY, Qian CX, Recchia FM, Fahim AT, Besirli CG
Ophthalmol Retina 2021 Jan;5(1):86-96. Epub 2020 Apr 9 doi: 10.1016/j.oret.2020.03.026. PMID: 32507488Free PMC Article
Lin JB, Sene A, Wiley LA, Santeford A, Nudleman E, Nakamura R, Lin JB, Moolani HV, Apte RS
Exp Eye Res 2018 Sep;174:107-112. Epub 2018 Jun 1 doi: 10.1016/j.exer.2018.05.033. PMID: 29864439Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Britten-Jones AC, Gocuk SA, Goh KL, Huq A, Edwards TL, Ayton LN
Am J Ophthalmol 2023 May;249:57-73. Epub 2022 Dec 30 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2022.12.027. PMID: 36592879
Wang X, Chen J, Xiong H, Yu X
PLoS One 2022;17(7):e0271326. Epub 2022 Jul 13 doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0271326. PMID: 35830446Free PMC Article
Abikoye TM, Idowu OO, Oluleye TS
Int J Clin Pract 2021 Dec;75(12):e14911. Epub 2021 Sep 26 doi: 10.1111/ijcp.14911. PMID: 34551184

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