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Gastrointestinal hemorrhage

MedGen UID:
8971
Concept ID:
C0017181
Pathologic Function
Synonyms: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage; Gastrointestinal Hemorrhages; Hemorrhage, Gastrointestinal
SNOMED CT: GI - Gastrointestinal hemorrhage (74474003); GIH - Gastrointestinal hemorrhage (74474003); GIT - Gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage (74474003); Gastrointestinal bleed (74474003); GI - Gastrointestinal bleed (74474003); Gastrointestinal hemorrhage (74474003); GI bleeding (74474003); GI hemorrhage (74474003); Gastrointestinal bleeding (74474003)
 
HPO: HP:0002239

Definition

Hemorrhage affecting the gastrointestinal tract. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Bernard Soulier syndrome
MedGen UID:
2212
Concept ID:
C0005129
Disease or Syndrome
Bernard-Soulier syndrome is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder caused by a defect in or deficiency of the platelet membrane von Willebrand factor (VWF; 613160) receptor complex, glycoprotein Ib (GP Ib). GP Ib is composed of 4 subunits encoded by 4 separate genes: GP1BA, GP1BB, GP9, and GP5 (173511). Genetic Heterogeneity of Platelet-Type Bleeding Disorders Inherited platelet disorders are a heterogeneous group of bleeding disorders affecting platelet number, function, or both. Functional defects can involve platelet receptors, signaling pathways, cytoskeletal proteins, granule contents, activation, or aggregation (review by Cox et al., 2011 and Nurden and Nurden, 2011). Platelet-type bleeding disorders include Bernard-Soulier syndrome (BDPLT1); Glanzmann thrombasthenia (BDPLT2; 273800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; pseudo-von Willebrand disease (BDPLT3; 177820), caused by mutation in the GP1BA gene (606672); gray platelet syndrome (BDPLT4; 139090), caused by mutation in the NBEAL2 gene (614169); Quebec platelet disorder (BDPLT5; 601709), caused by tandem duplication of the PLAU gene (191840); May-Hegglin anomaly (BDPLT6; 155100), caused by mutation in the MYH9 gene (160775); Scott syndrome (BDPLT7; 262890), caused by mutation in the TMEM16F gene (608663); BDPLT8 (609821), caused by mutation in the P2RY12 gene (600515); BDPLT9 (614200), associated with deficiency of the glycoprotein Ia/IIa receptor (see ITGA2; 192974); glycoprotein IV deficiency (BDPLT10; 608404), caused by mutation in the CD36 gene (173510); BDPLT11 (614201), caused by mutation in the GP6 gene (605546); BDPLT12 (605735), associated with a deficiency of platelet COX1 (176805); susceptibility to BDPLT13 (614009), caused by mutation in the TBXA2R gene (188070); BDPLT14 (614158), associated with deficiency of thromboxane synthetase (TBXAS1; 274180); BDPLT15 (615193), caused by mutation in the ACTN1 gene (102575); BDPLT16 (187800), caused by mutation in the ITGA2B (607759) or ITGB3 (173470) gene; BDPLT17 (187900), caused by mutation in the GFI1B gene (604383); BDPLT18 (615888), caused by mutation in the RASGRP2 gene (605577); BDPLT19 (616176), caused by mutation in the PRKACG gene (176893); BDPLT20 (616913), caused by mutation in the SLFN14 gene (614958); BDPLT21 (617443), caused by mutation in the FLI1 gene (193067); BDPLT22 (618462), caused by mutation in the EPHB2 gene (600997); BDPLT23 (619267), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); BDPLT24 (619271), caused by mutation in the ITGB3 gene (173470); and BDPLT25 (620486), caused by mutation in the TPM4 gene (600317). See reviews by Rao (2003), Cox et al. (2011), and Nurden and Nurden (2011). For a discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of hereditary thrombocytopenia, see THC1 (313900).
Hereditary factor IX deficiency disease
MedGen UID:
945
Concept ID:
C0008533
Disease or Syndrome
Hemophilia B is characterized by deficiency in factor IX clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor IX clotting activity. In individuals with severe hemophilia B, spontaneous joint or deep-muscle bleeding is the most frequent sign. Individuals with severe hemophilia B are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life; without prophylactic treatment, they may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month. Individuals with moderate hemophilia B seldom have spontaneous bleeding; however, they do have prolonged or delayed oozing after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia B do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and postoperative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding may vary from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia B are often not diagnosed until later in life. In any individual with hemophilia B, bleeding episodes may be more frequent in childhood and adolescence than in adulthood. Approximately 30% of heterozygous females have factor IX clotting activity lower than 40% and are at risk for bleeding (even if the affected family member has mild hemophilia B), although symptoms are usually mild. After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity.
Hereditary fructosuria
MedGen UID:
42105
Concept ID:
C0016751
Disease or Syndrome
Following dietary exposure to fructose, sucrose, or sorbitol, untreated hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is characterized by metabolic disturbances (hypoglycemia, lactic acidemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, hypermagnesemia, hyperalaninemia) and clinical findings (nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distress; chronic growth restriction / failure to thrive). While untreated HFI typically first manifested when fructose- and sucrose-containing foods were introduced in the course of weaning young infants from breast milk, it is now presenting earlier, due to the addition of fructose-containing nutrients in infant formulas. If the infant ingests large quantities of fructose, the infant may acutely develop lethargy, seizures, and/or progressive coma. Untreated HFI may result in renal and hepatic failure. If identified and treated before permanent organ injury occurs, individuals with HFI can experience a normal quality of life and life expectancy.
Acquired polycythemia vera
MedGen UID:
45996
Concept ID:
C0032463
Neoplastic Process
Polycythemia vera (PV), the most common form of primary polycythemia, is caused by somatic mutation in a single hematopoietic stem cell leading to clonal hematopoiesis. PV is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized predominantly by erythroid hyperplasia, but also by myeloid leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and splenomegaly. Familial cases of PV are very rare and usually manifest in elderly patients (Cario, 2005). PV is distinct from the familial erythrocytoses (see, e.g., ECYT1, 133100), which are caused by inherited mutations resulting in hypersensitivity of erythroid progenitors to hormonal influences or increased levels of circulating hormones, namely erythropoietin (EPO; 133170) (Prchal, 2005).
Glanzmann thrombasthenia
MedGen UID:
52736
Concept ID:
C0040015
Disease or Syndrome
Glanzmann thrombasthenia is a bleeding disorder that is characterized by prolonged or spontaneous bleeding starting from birth. People with Glanzmann thrombasthenia tend to bruise easily, have frequent nosebleeds (epistaxis), and may bleed from the gums. They may also develop red or purple spots on the skin caused by bleeding underneath the skin (petechiae) or swelling caused by bleeding within tissues (hematoma). Glanzmann thrombasthenia can also cause prolonged bleeding following injury, trauma, or surgery (including dental work). Women with this condition can have prolonged and sometimes abnormally heavy menstrual bleeding. Affected women also have an increased risk of excessive blood loss during pregnancy and childbirth.\n\nAbout a quarter of individuals with Glanzmann thrombasthenia have bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract, which often occurs later in life. Rarely, affected individuals have bleeding inside the skull (intracranial hemorrhage) or joints (hemarthrosis).\n\nThe severity and frequency of the bleeding episodes in Glanzmann thrombasthenia can vary greatly among affected individuals, even in the same family. Spontaneous bleeding tends to become less frequent with age.
Malignant atrophic papulosis
MedGen UID:
113138
Concept ID:
C0221011
Disease or Syndrome
Malignant atrophic papulosis (MAP) is a rare, chronic, thrombo-obliterative vasculopathy characterized by papular skin lesions with central porcelain-white atrophy and a surrounding teleangiectatic rim. Systemic lesions may affect the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous system (CNS) and are potentially lethal.
Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, kyphoscoliotic type 1
MedGen UID:
75672
Concept ID:
C0268342
Disease or Syndrome
PLOD1-related kyphoscoliotic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (kEDS) is an autosomal recessive generalized connective tissue disorder characterized by hypotonia, early-onset kyphoscoliosis, and generalized joint hypermobility in association with skin fragility and ocular abnormality. Intelligence is normal. Life span may be normal, but affected individuals are at risk for rupture of medium-sized arteries. Adults with severe kyphoscoliosis are at risk for complications from restrictive lung disease, recurrent pneumonia, and cardiac failure.
Tyrosinemia type I
MedGen UID:
75688
Concept ID:
C0268490
Disease or Syndrome
Untreated tyrosinemia type I usually presents either in young infants with severe liver involvement or later in the first year with liver dysfunction and renal tubular dysfunction associated with growth failure and rickets. Untreated children may have repeated, often unrecognized, neurologic crises lasting one to seven days that can include change in mental status, abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, and/or respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Death in the untreated child usually occurs before age ten years, typically from liver failure, neurologic crisis, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Combined treatment with nitisinone and a low-tyrosine diet has resulted in a greater than 90% survival rate, normal growth, improved liver function, prevention of cirrhosis, correction of renal tubular acidosis, and improvement in secondary rickets.
Congenital prothrombin deficiency
MedGen UID:
124425
Concept ID:
C0272317
Disease or Syndrome
Prothrombin deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by low levels of circulating prothrombin; it affects about 1 in 2,000,000 individuals. There are 2 main types: type I deficiency, known as true prothrombin deficiency or 'hypoprothrombinemia,' is defined as plasma levels of prothrombin being less than 10% of normal with a concomitant decrease in activity. These patients have severe bleeding from birth, including umbilical cord hemorrhage, hematomas, ecchymoses, hematuria, mucosal bleeding, hemarthroses, intracranial bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, and menorrhagia. Type II deficiency, known as 'dysprothrombinemia,' is characterized by normal or low-normal synthesis of a dysfunctional protein. Bleeding symptoms are more variable, depending on the amount of residual functional activity. Variant prothrombin gene alleles can result in 'hypoprothrombinemia' or 'dysprothrombinemia,' and individuals who are compound heterozygous for these 2 types of alleles have variable manifestations. Heterozygous mutation carriers, who have plasma levels between 40 and 60% of normal, are usually asymptomatic, but can show bleeding after tooth extraction or surgical procedures (review by Lancellotti and De Cristofaro, 2009).
Reynolds syndrome
MedGen UID:
450547
Concept ID:
C0748397
Disease or Syndrome
An autoimmune disorder characterized by the association of primary biliary cirrhosis with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis. Onset occurs between 30-65 years. Occurs sporadically, but rare familial cases with an unknown inheritance pattern have been observed. There is no cure and management is mainly supportive.
von Willebrand disease type 1
MedGen UID:
220393
Concept ID:
C1264039
Disease or Syndrome
Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding.
Hereditary neurocutaneous angiomata
MedGen UID:
226898
Concept ID:
C1275084
Neoplastic Process
A rare genetic vascular anomaly characterized by the presence of angiomatous lesions affecting the skin, brain, and spinal cord. Lesions of the central nervous system have a marked tendency to bleed. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1988.
Autosomal recessive inherited pseudoxanthoma elasticum
MedGen UID:
698415
Concept ID:
C1275116
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic disorder that affects the elastic tissue of the skin, the eye, and vascular system. Individuals most commonly present with angioid streaks of the retina found on routine eye examination or associated with retinal hemorrhage and/or characteristic papules in the skin. The most frequent cause of morbidity and disability in PXE is reduced vision due to complications of subretinal neovascularizations and macular atrophy. Other manifestations include premature gastrointestinal angina and/or bleeding, intermittent claudication of arm and leg muscles, stroke, renovascular hypertension, and cardiovascular complications (angina/myocardial infarction). Most affected individuals live a normal life span.
TNF receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS)
MedGen UID:
226899
Concept ID:
C1275126
Disease or Syndrome
Familial periodic fever (FPF) is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent fever with localized myalgia and painful erythema. Febrile attacks may last 1 or 2 days but often last longer than 1 week. Arthralgia of large joints, abdominal pain, conjunctivitis, and periorbital edema are common features. During attacks, painless cutaneous lesions may develop on the trunk or extremities and may migrate distally (review by Drenth and van der Meer, 2001).
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2A
MedGen UID:
349065
Concept ID:
C1858968
Disease or Syndrome
Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), caused by defective lymphocyte homeostasis, is characterized by the following: Non-malignant lymphoproliferation (lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly with or without hypersplenism) that often improves with age. Autoimmune disease, mostly directed toward blood cells. Lifelong increased risk for both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In ALPS-FAS (the most common and best-characterized type of ALPS, associated with heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS), non-malignant lymphoproliferation typically manifests in the first years of life, inexplicably waxes and wanes, and then often decreases without treatment in the second decade of life; in many affected individuals, however, neither splenomegaly nor the overall expansion of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood decreases. Although autoimmunity is often not present at the time of diagnosis or at the time of the most extensive lymphoproliferation, autoantibodies can be detected before autoimmune disease manifests clinically. In ALPS-FAS caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous (biallelic) pathogenic variants in FAS, severe lymphoproliferation occurs before, at, or shortly after birth, and usually results in death at an early age. ALPS-sFAS, resulting from somatic FAS pathogenic variants in selected cell populations, notably the alpha/beta double-negative T cells (a/ß-DNT cells), appears to be similar to ALPS-FAS resulting from heterozygous germline pathogenic variants in FAS, although lower incidence of splenectomy and lower lymphocyte counts have been reported in ALPS-sFAS and no cases of lymphoma have yet been published.
Retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukoencephalopathy and systemic manifestations
MedGen UID:
348124
Concept ID:
C1860518
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukoencephalopathy and systemic manifestations (RVCL-S) is a small-vessel disease that affects highly vascularized tissues including the retina, brain, liver, and kidneys. Age of onset is often between 35 and 50 years. The most common presenting finding is decreased visual acuity and/or visual field defects. Neurologic manifestations may include hemiparesis, facial weakness, aphasia, and hemianopsia. Migraines and seizures are less frequently described. Renal manifestations may include mild-to-moderate increase in serum creatinine and mild proteinuria; progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is uncommon. Hepatic manifestations frequently include mildly elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Less common findings include psychiatric disorders, hypertension, mild-to-moderate anemia, and Raynaud phenomenon.
Platelet-type bleeding disorder 17
MedGen UID:
396078
Concept ID:
C1861194
Disease or Syndrome
Platelet-type bleeding disorder-17 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by increased bleeding tendency due to abnormal platelet function. It is a type of 'gray platelet syndrome' because the platelets appear abnormal on light microscopy. Electron microscopy shows decreased or absent alpha-granules within platelets, and bone marrow biopsy shows increased numbers of abnormal megakaryocytes, suggesting a defect in megakaryopoiesis and platelet production. The bleeding severity is variable (summary by Monteferrario et al., 2014).
Pseudoxanthoma elasticum, forme fruste
MedGen UID:
357280
Concept ID:
C1867450
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a systemic disorder that affects the elastic tissue of the skin, the eye, and vascular system. Individuals most commonly present with angioid streaks of the retina found on routine eye examination or associated with retinal hemorrhage and/or characteristic papules in the skin. The most frequent cause of morbidity and disability in PXE is reduced vision due to complications of subretinal neovascularizations and macular atrophy. Other manifestations include premature gastrointestinal angina and/or bleeding, intermittent claudication of arm and leg muscles, stroke, renovascular hypertension, and cardiovascular complications (angina/myocardial infarction). Most affected individuals live a normal life span.
Dyskeratosis congenita, autosomal dominant 3
MedGen UID:
462795
Concept ID:
C3151445
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts 2
MedGen UID:
1390862
Concept ID:
C4479220
Disease or Syndrome
Dyskeratosis congenita and related telomere biology disorders (DC/TBD) are caused by impaired telomere maintenance resulting in short or very short telomeres. The phenotypic spectrum of telomere biology disorders is broad and includes individuals with classic dyskeratosis congenita (DC) as well as those with very short telomeres and an isolated physical finding. Classic DC is characterized by a triad of dysplastic nails, lacy reticular pigmentation of the upper chest and/or neck, and oral leukoplakia, although this may not be present in all individuals. People with DC/TBD are at increased risk for progressive bone marrow failure (BMF), myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia, solid tumors (usually squamous cell carcinoma of the head/neck or anogenital cancer), and pulmonary fibrosis. Other findings can include eye abnormalities (epiphora, blepharitis, sparse eyelashes, ectropion, entropion, trichiasis), taurodontism, liver disease, gastrointestinal telangiectasias, and avascular necrosis of the hips or shoulders. Although most persons with DC/TBD have normal psychomotor development and normal neurologic function, significant developmental delay is present in both forms; additional findings include cerebellar hypoplasia (Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome) and bilateral exudative retinopathy and intracranial calcifications (Revesz syndrome and Coats plus syndrome). Onset and progression of manifestations of DC/TBD vary: at the mild end of the spectrum are those who have only minimal physical findings with normal bone marrow function, and at the severe end are those who have the diagnostic triad and early-onset BMF.
Telangiectasia, hereditary hemorrhagic, type 1
MedGen UID:
1643786
Concept ID:
C4551861
Disease or Syndrome
Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are characteristically found on the lips, tongue, buccal and gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, face, and fingers. The appearance of telangiectases is generally later than epistaxis but may be during childhood. Large AVMs occur most often in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. A minority of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which is rarely seen before age 50 years.
Bleeding disorder, platelet-type, 22
MedGen UID:
1673822
Concept ID:
C5193111
Disease or Syndrome
Platelet-type bleeding disorder-22 (BDPLT22) is an autosomal recessive bleeding disorder resulting from impaired platelet aggregation due to intracellular signaling defects. Patients present in the first decade with spontaneous subcutaneous bleeding and excessive bleeding after minor injuries. Platelet counts are usually normal, although platelets show abnormal morphology (summary by Berrou et al., 2018).
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts 3
MedGen UID:
1841133
Concept ID:
C5830497
Disease or Syndrome
Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts-3 (CRMCC3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, retinal exudates, intracranial calcifications, and leukoencephalopathy. Additional features may include global developmental delay and gastrointestinal ectasias. Telomeres may be elongated, but truncated shortened telomeres are present in some tissues (Takai et al., 2016). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CRMCC, see CRMCC1 (612199).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

M'Koma AE
Medicina (Kaunas) 2022 Apr 21;58(5) doi: 10.3390/medicina58050567. PMID: 35629984Free PMC Article
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Samuel R, Bilal M, Tayyem O, Guturu P
Dis Mon 2018 Jul;64(7):333-343. Epub 2018 Mar 7 doi: 10.1016/j.disamonth.2018.02.003. PMID: 29525375

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

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Prognosis

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Clinical prediction guides

Laursen SB, Oakland K, Laine L, Bieber V, Marmo R, Redondo-Cerezo E, Dalton HR, Ngu J, Schultz M, Soncini M, Gralnek I, Jairath V, Murray IA, Stanley AJ
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Stanley AJ, Laine L, Dalton HR, Ngu JH, Schultz M, Abazi R, Zakko L, Thornton S, Wilkinson K, Khor CJ, Murray IA, Laursen SB; International Gastrointestinal Bleeding Consortium
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