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Submucous cleft hard palate

MedGen UID:
98472
Concept ID:
C0432103
Congenital Abnormality
Synonym: Submucosal cleft palate
SNOMED CT: Submucous cleft of hard palate (43437003)
 
HPO: HP:0000176
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0015479
Orphanet: ORPHA155878

Definition

Hard-palate submucous clefts are characterized by bony defects in the midline of the bony palate that are covered by the mucous membrane of the roof of the mouth. It may be possible to detect a submucous cleft hard palate upon palpation as a notch in the bony palate. [from HPO]

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • CROGVSubmucous cleft hard palate

Conditions with this feature

Dubowitz syndrome
MedGen UID:
59797
Concept ID:
C0175691
Disease or Syndrome
Dubowitz syndrome (DS) is a rare multiple congenital syndrome characterized primarly by growth retardation, microcephaly, distinctive facial dysmorphism, cutaneous eczema, a mild to severe intellectual deficit and genital abnormalities.
Gordon syndrome
MedGen UID:
66314
Concept ID:
C0220666
Disease or Syndrome
DA3, or Gordon syndrome, is distinguished from other distal arthrogryposes by short stature and cleft palate (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). There are 2 syndromes with features overlapping those of DA3 that are also caused by heterozygous mutation in PIEZO2: distal arthrogryposis type 5 (DA5; 108145) and Marden-Walker syndrome (MWKS; 248700), which are distinguished by the presence of ocular abnormalities and mental retardation, respectively. McMillin et al. (2014) suggested that the 3 disorders may represent variable expressivity of the same condition. For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120).
Velocardiofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
65085
Concept ID:
C0220704
Disease or Syndrome
Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) can present with a wide range of features that are highly variable, even within families. The major clinical manifestations of 22q11.2DS include congenital heart disease, particularly conotruncal malformations (ventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, interrupted aortic arch, and truncus arteriosus), palatal abnormalities (velopharyngeal incompetence, submucosal cleft palate, bifid uvula, and cleft palate), immune deficiency, characteristic facial features, and learning difficulties. Hearing loss can be sensorineural and/or conductive. Laryngotracheoesophageal, gastrointestinal, ophthalmologic, central nervous system, skeletal, and genitourinary anomalies also occur. Psychiatric illness and autoimmune disorders are more common in individuals with 22q11.2DS.
Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome
MedGen UID:
266149
Concept ID:
C1275081
Disease or Syndrome
Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by cardiac abnormalities (pulmonic stenosis and other valve dysplasias, septal defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, rhythm disturbances), distinctive craniofacial appearance, and cutaneous abnormalities (including xerosis, hyperkeratosis, ichthyosis, keratosis pilaris, ulerythema ophryogenes, eczema, pigmented moles, hemangiomas, and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis). The hair is typically sparse, curly, fine or thick, woolly or brittle; eyelashes and eyebrows may be absent or sparse. Nails may be dystrophic or fast growing. Some form of neurologic and/or cognitive delay (ranging from mild to severe) is seen in all affected individuals. Neoplasia, mostly acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been reported in some individuals.
Deficiency of hyaluronoglucosaminidase
MedGen UID:
226942
Concept ID:
C1291490
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type IX (MPS9) is a rare progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of the enzyme hyaluronoglucosaminidase-1, which degrades hyaluronan (summary by Imundo et al., 2011).
Schilbach-Rott syndrome
MedGen UID:
371716
Concept ID:
C1834038
Disease or Syndrome
Schilbach-Rott syndrome (SBRS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hypotelorism, epicanthal folds, cleft palate, dysmorphic facies, and hypospadias in males. The phenotype is variable; mild mental retardation has been reported (summary by Shkalim et al., 2009).
Holoprosencephaly 2
MedGen UID:
322517
Concept ID:
C1834877
Disease or Syndrome
A rare disorder characterized by the partial separation of the cerebral hemispheres. It is associated with mutations in the SIX3 gene.
Branchiogenic deafness syndrome
MedGen UID:
322970
Concept ID:
C1836673
Disease or Syndrome
A multiple congenital anomalies syndrome, described in one family to date, with characteristics of branchial cysts or fistula, ear malformations, congenital hearing loss (conductive, sensorineural, and mixed), internal auditory canal hypoplasia, strabismus, trismus, abnormal fifth fingers, vitiliginous lesions, short stature and mild learning disability. Renal and urethral abnormalities are absent.
Bencze syndrome
MedGen UID:
330655
Concept ID:
C1841640
Disease or Syndrome
A malformation syndrome involving the abnormal growth of the facial skeleton as well as its soft tissue structure and organs. The syndrome has characteristics of mild facial asymmetry with unaffected neurocranium and eyeballs, along with esotropia, amblyopia and/or convergent strabismus and occasionally submucous cleft palate. Transmission is autosomal dominant. There have been no further descriptions in the literature since 1979.
Chromosome 1p36 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
334629
Concept ID:
C1842870
Disease or Syndrome
The constitutional deletion of chromosome 1p36 results in a syndrome with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (Shapira et al., 1997). Monosomy 1p36 is the most common terminal deletion syndrome in humans, occurring in 1 in 5,000 births (Shaffer and Lupski, 2000; Heilstedt et al., 2003). See also neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart (NEDBEH; 616975), which shows overlapping features and is caused by heterozygous mutation in the RERE gene (605226) on proximal chromosome 1p36. See also Radio-Tartaglia syndrome (RATARS; 619312), caused by mutation in the SPEN gene (613484) on chromosome 1p36, which shows overlapping features.
Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome
MedGen UID:
337547
Concept ID:
C1846265
Disease or Syndrome
Oculofaciocardiodental (OFCD) syndrome is a condition that affects the development of the eyes (oculo-), facial features (facio-), heart (cardio-) and teeth (dental). This condition occurs only in females.\n\nThe eye abnormalities associated with OFCD syndrome can affect one or both eyes. Many people with this condition are born with eyeballs that are abnormally small (microphthalmia). Other eye problems can include clouding of the lens (cataract) and a higher risk of glaucoma, an eye disease that increases the pressure in the eye. These abnormalities can lead to vision loss or blindness.\n\nPeople with OFCD syndrome often have a long, narrow face with distinctive facial features, including deep-set eyes and a broad nasal tip that is divided by a cleft. Some affected people have an opening in the roof of the mouth called a cleft palate.\n\nHeart defects are another common feature of OFCD syndrome. Babies with this condition may be born with a hole between two chambers of the heart (an atrial or ventricular septal defect) or a leak in one of the valves that controls blood flow through the heart (mitral valve prolapse).\n\nTeeth with very large roots (radiculomegaly) are characteristic of OFCD syndrome. Additional dental abnormalities can include delayed loss of primary (baby) teeth, missing or abnormally small teeth, misaligned teeth, and defective tooth enamel.
Mowat-Wilson syndrome
MedGen UID:
341067
Concept ID:
C1856113
Disease or Syndrome
Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is characterized by distinctive facial features (widely spaced eyes, broad eyebrows with a medial flare, low-hanging columella, prominent or pointed chin, open-mouth expression, and uplifted earlobes with a central depression), congenital heart defects with predilection for abnormalities of the pulmonary arteries and/or valves, Hirschsprung disease or chronic constipation, genitourinary anomalies (particularly hypospadias in males), and hypogenesis or agenesis of the corpus callosum. Most affected individuals have moderate-to-severe intellectual disability. Speech is typically limited to a few words or is absent, with relative preservation of receptive language skills. Growth restriction with microcephaly and seizure disorder are also common. Most affected people have a happy demeanor and a wide-based gait that can sometimes be confused with Angelman syndrome.
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2
MedGen UID:
341734
Concept ID:
C1857242
Disease or Syndrome
Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by disproportionately short stature primarily affecting the proximal parts of the extremities, a typical facial appearance including a broad nasal bridge, epicanthus, high-arched palate, dysplastic external ears, and micrognathia, congenital contractures, characteristic ocular involvement, dwarfism, and severe mental retardation with spasticity. Biochemically, plasmalogen synthesis and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation are defective. Most patients die in the first decade of life. RCDP1 (215100) is the most frequent form of RCDP (summary by Wanders and Waterham, 2005). Whereas RCDP1 is a peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD), RCDP2 is classified as a single peroxisome enzyme deficiency (Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, see 215100.
Ventricular extrasystoles with syncopal episodes-perodactyly-robin sequence syndrome
MedGen UID:
395493
Concept ID:
C1860471
Disease or Syndrome
This syndrome is characterized by cardiac arrhythmias (ventricular extrasystoles manifesting as bigeminy or multifocal tachycardia with syncopal episodes), perodactyly (hypoplasia and/or agenesis of the distal phalanges of the toes) and Pierre-Robin sequence (see this term).
Camptomelic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
354620
Concept ID:
C1861922
Disease or Syndrome
Campomelic dysplasia (CD) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by distinctive facies, Pierre Robin sequence with cleft palate, shortening and bowing of long bones, and clubfeet. Other findings include laryngotracheomalacia with respiratory compromise and ambiguous genitalia or normal female external genitalia in most individuals with a 46,XY karyotype. Many affected infants die in the neonatal period; additional findings identified in long-term survivors include short stature, cervical spine instability with cord compression, progressive scoliosis, and hearing impairment.
Stickler syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
810955
Concept ID:
C2020284
Disease or Syndrome
Stickler syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can include ocular findings of myopia, cataract, and retinal detachment; hearing loss that is both conductive and sensorineural; midfacial underdevelopment and cleft palate (either alone or as part of the Robin sequence); and mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia and/or precocious arthritis. Variable phenotypic expression of Stickler syndrome occurs both within and among families; interfamilial variability is in part explained by locus and allelic heterogeneity.
Chromosome 6q24-q25 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
461565
Concept ID:
C3150215
Disease or Syndrome
6q25 microdeletion syndrome is a recently described syndrome characterized by developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and hearing loss.
Meier-Gorlin syndrome 5
MedGen UID:
462476
Concept ID:
C3151126
Disease or Syndrome
Most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge.\n\nAdditional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.\n\nAbnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair.\n\nMeier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect.\n\nSome people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age).
Cornelia de Lange syndrome 4
MedGen UID:
766431
Concept ID:
C3553517
Disease or Syndrome
Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) encompasses a spectrum of findings from mild to severe. Severe (classic) CdLS is characterized by distinctive facial features, growth restriction (prenatal onset; <5th centile throughout life), hypertrichosis, and upper-limb reduction defects that range from subtle phalangeal abnormalities to oligodactyly (missing digits). Craniofacial features include synophrys, highly arched and/or thick eyebrows, long eyelashes, short nasal bridge with anteverted nares, small widely spaced teeth, and microcephaly. Individuals with a milder phenotype have less severe growth, cognitive, and limb involvement, but often have facial features consistent with CdLS. Across the CdLS spectrum IQ ranges from below 30 to 102 (mean: 53). Many individuals demonstrate autistic and self-destructive tendencies. Other frequent findings include cardiac septal defects, gastrointestinal dysfunction, hearing loss, myopia, and cryptorchidism or hypoplastic genitalia.
ZTTK syndrome
MedGen UID:
934663
Concept ID:
C4310696
Disease or Syndrome
ZTTK syndrome (ZTTKS) is a severe multisystem developmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and intellectual disability. Affected individuals have characteristic dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, poor feeding, poor overall growth, and eye or visual abnormalities. Most patients also have musculoskeletal abnormalities, and some have congenital defects of the heart and urogenital system. Brain imaging usually shows developmental abnormalities such as gyral changes, cortical and/or cerebellar atrophy, and thin corpus callosum (summary by Kim et al., 2016).
Midface hypoplasia, hearing impairment, elliptocytosis, and nephrocalcinosis
MedGen UID:
934777
Concept ID:
C4310810
Disease or Syndrome
Midface hypoplasia, hearing impairment, elliptocytosis, and nephrocalcinosis is an X-linked recessive disorder with onset of features in early childhood. Anemia is sometimes present. Some patients may show mild early motor or speech delay, but cognition is normal (summary by Andreoletti et al., 2017).
Brachycephaly, trichomegaly, and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1374289
Concept ID:
C4479431
Disease or Syndrome
BTDD is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by brachycephaly, trichomegaly, and developmental delay. Although it is caused by dysfunction of the ribosome, patients do not have anemia (summary by Paolini et al., 2017).
Vertebral, cardiac, renal, and limb defects syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
1621146
Concept ID:
C4540004
Disease or Syndrome
Vertebral, cardiac, renal, and limb defects syndrome-1 (VCRL1) is an autosomal recessive congenital malformation syndrome characterized by vertebral segmentation abnormalities, congenital cardiac defects, renal defects, and mild distal limb defects. Additional features are variable (summary by Shi et al., 2017). Genetic Heterogeneity of Vertebral, Cardiac, Renal, and Limb Defects Syndrome See also VCRL2 (617661), caused by mutation in the KYNU gene (605197) on chromosome 2q22, and VCRL3 (618845), caused by mutation in the NADSYN1 gene (608285) on chromosome 11q13.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 58
MedGen UID:
1648488
Concept ID:
C4748195
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly 13, X-linked
MedGen UID:
1714826
Concept ID:
C5393308
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked holoprosencephaly-13 (HPE13) is a neurologic disorder characterized by midline developmental defects that mainly affect the brain and craniofacial structure. The severity and manifestations are variable: some patients may have full alobar HPE with cyclopia, whereas others have semilobar HPE or septooptic dysplasia. Dysmorphic features include microcephaly, hypotelorism, low-set ears, micrognathia, and cleft lip/palate. Patients with a more severe phenotype may die in the newborn period, whereas those with a less severe phenotype show global developmental delay. Additional variable features include congenital heart defects and vertebral anomalies. Phenotypic variability may be related to the type of mutation, X-inactivation status, and possible incomplete penetrance. The STAG2 protein is part of the multiprotein cohesin complex involved in chromatid cohesion during DNA replication and transcriptional regulation; HPE13 can thus be classified as a 'cohesinopathy' (summary by Kruszka et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of holoprosencephaly, see HPE1 (236100).
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome
MedGen UID:
1718781
Concept ID:
C5394425
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome (MDBH) is a multisystem disorder with clinical variability. Affected individuals show cognitive and motor disabilities, as well as some degree of fine, brittle hair with microscopic shaft abnormalities. Other shared features include failure to thrive in early childhood and short stature, with some patients exhibiting feeding difficulties and hepatic steatosis (Kuo et al., 2019).
Tolchin-Le Caignec syndrome
MedGen UID:
1724999
Concept ID:
C5436509
Disease or Syndrome
Tolchin-Le Caignec syndrome (TOLCAS) is a developmental disorder characterized by mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development and behavioral problems, such as autism, ADHD, labile mood, and aggressive episodes. Many patients have bony abnormalities, including osteochondroma, craniosynostosis, dysmorphic facies, arachnodactyly, and large head circumference. Rarely, additional congenital anomalies may also be observed. These additional features and the bony defects are highly variable (summary by Tolchin et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, sleep disturbance, and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1777442
Concept ID:
C5436821
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with dysmorphic facies, sleep disturbance, and brain abnormalities (NEDFASB) is a syndromic disorder with multisystemic involvement. Affected individuals have severe global developmental delay with severely impaired intellectual development, poor or absent language, behavioral abnormalities, seizures, and sleep disturbances. Craniofacial dysmorphisms, while variable, include round face, prognathism, depressed nasal bridge, and cleft or high-arched palate. Brain imaging shows dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and progressive cerebellar atrophy. Additional features may include genitourinary tract anomalies, hearing loss, and mild distal skeletal defects (summary by Humbert et al., 2020).
Vertebral hypersegmentation and orofacial anomalies
MedGen UID:
1746640
Concept ID:
C5436851
Disease or Syndrome
Vertebral hypersegmentation and orofacial anomalies (VHO) is characterized by supernumerary cervical, thoracic, and/or lumbar vertebrae, in association with supernumerary ribs. Most patients also exhibit orofacial clefting and ear anomalies (Cox et al., 2019).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 12
MedGen UID:
1782096
Concept ID:
C5444111
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome-12 (CSS12) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development, speech and language delay, and behavioral abnormalities, such as autism or hyperactivity. Affected individuals may have hypotonia and poor feeding in infancy. There are variable dysmorphic facial features, although most patients do not have the classic hypoplastic fifth digit/nail abnormalities that are often observed in other forms of CSS (Barish et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Coffin-Siris syndrome, see CSS1 (135900).
Neurofacioskeletal syndrome with or without renal agenesis
MedGen UID:
1778926
Concept ID:
C5543070
Disease or Syndrome
Neurofacioskeletal syndrome with or without renal agenesis (NFSRA) is characterized by developmental delay and/or intellectual disability; corpus callosum hypoplasia or agenesis; facial dysmorphism, including upslanting palpebral fissures, broad nasal tip, and wide mouth; and skeletal abnormalities, including short stature, scoliosis, and flexion contractures, with broad fingertips and/or toes. Renal agenesis, unilateral or bilateral, has also been observed in some patients (Schneeberger et al., 2020).
Vertebral, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb defects
MedGen UID:
1788069
Concept ID:
C5543189
Disease or Syndrome
VCTERL syndrome is characterized by anomalies of the vertebrae, heart, trachea, esophagus, kidneys, and limbs. Some patients also exhibit craniofacial abnormalities. Incomplete penetrance and markedly variable disease expression have been observed, including intrafamilial variability (Martin et al., 2020).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without autism or seizures
MedGen UID:
1784023
Concept ID:
C5543225
Disease or Syndrome
CUL3-related neurodevelopmental disorder is a condition that affects neurological and physical development. Children with CUL3-related neurodevelopmental disorder may have intellectual disability or specific learning disorders. They may also experience delayed development of speech and motor skills, such as sitting and walking. Some individuals with this condition may have autism spectrum disorder, a developmental condition that affects communication and social skills. \n\nMovement abnormalities can also occur in people with CUL3-related neurodevelopmental disorder. Affected individuals may have weak muscle tone (hypotonia) in childhood. In adulthood, they may develop involuntary muscle tensing (dystonia), rhythmic shaking (tremor), or other uncontrolled movements (spasms). \n\nPeople with CUL3-related neurodevelopmental disorder can have distinctive facial features, including a long, triangular-shaped face; a large forehead; a large, rounded nose; small ears; deep-set eyes; or a pointed chin. Some affected individuals have a larger than normal head (macrocephaly). \n\nMany people with CUL3-related neurodevelopmental disorder have hand and foot abnormalities. Hand abnormalities can include small pinky (fifth) fingers that curve inward (clinodactyly), narrow thumbs, underdevelopment of the muscle at the base of the thumb (thenar hypoplasia), or a single crease across the palm of the hand. Foot abnormalities can include high arches of the feet (pes cavus); bunions; fusion of the skin between some toes (cutaneous syndactyly); or joint deformities (contractures) in the ankles, feet, or toes. A few individuals with CUL3-related neurodevelopmental disorder have an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). \n\nSome affected infants have a backflow of stomach acids into the esophagus (gastroesophageal reflux disease or GERD), which tends to go away after childhood. Rarely, recurrent seizures (epilepsy), congenital heart abnormalities, or genitourinary abnormalities occur in people with CUL3-related neurodevelopmental disorder. 
Buratti-Harel syndrome
MedGen UID:
1788293
Concept ID:
C5543351
Disease or Syndrome
Buratti-Harel syndrome (BURHAS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, global developmental delay, mild motor and speech delay, and mild to moderately impaired intellectual development. Some patients are able to attend special schools and show learning difficulties, whereas others are more severely affected. Patients have prominent dysmorphic facial features, including hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, strabismus, and small low-set ears. Additional features may include laryngomalacia with feeding difficulties and distal skeletal anomalies (summary by Buratti et al., 2021).
Neuroocular syndrome
MedGen UID:
1790414
Concept ID:
C5551362
Disease or Syndrome
Marbach-Schaaf neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1794260
Concept ID:
C5562050
Disease or Syndrome
Marbach-Schaaf neurodevelopmental syndrom (MASNS) is characterized by global developmental delay with speech delay and behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder and ADHD. Affected individuals also show movement disorders, such as dyspraxia and apraxia. More variable features include high pain tolerance, sleep disturbances, and variable nonspecific dysmorphic features (summary by Marbach et al., 2021).
Restrictive dermopathy 1
MedGen UID:
1812447
Concept ID:
C5676878
Disease or Syndrome
A restrictive dermopathy that has material basis in homozygous or compound heterozygous mutation in the ZMPSTE24 gene on chromosome 1p34.

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Ku YC, Al-Malak M, Mulvihill L, Deleonibus A, Maasarani S, Bassiri Gharb B, Rampazzo A
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2023 Nov;86:300-314. Epub 2023 Sep 16 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2023.09.038. PMID: 37797378
Smit JA, Mulder PP, de Graaf F, de Bakker BS, Breugem CC
Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2021 Sep;58(9):1121-1127. Epub 2020 Dec 3 doi: 10.1177/1055665620977760. PMID: 33267609Free PMC Article
Abdel-Aziz M, El-Hoshy H, Naguib N, Talaat N
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2012 Jul;76(7):1012-6. Epub 2012 Apr 13 doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2012.03.021. PMID: 22503447
Chen KT, Wu J, Noordhoff SM
Changgeng Yi Xue Za Zhi 1994 Jun;17(2):131-7. PMID: 8069735
Kaplan EN
Cleft Palate J 1975 Oct;12:356-68. PMID: 1058746

Diagnosis

Hu JQ, Zhang YG, Feng W, Shi H
Ear Nose Throat J 2022 Nov;101(9):NP369-NP372. Epub 2020 Nov 23 doi: 10.1177/0145561320974867. PMID: 33226853
Smit JA, Mulder PP, de Graaf F, de Bakker BS, Breugem CC
Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2021 Sep;58(9):1121-1127. Epub 2020 Dec 3 doi: 10.1177/1055665620977760. PMID: 33267609Free PMC Article
Mori Y, Hoshi K, Takato T, Takahashi M, Hirano Y, Kanno Y, Ohkubo K, Saijo H
Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2013 Dec;51(8):e220-3. Epub 2013 Feb 23 doi: 10.1016/j.bjoms.2013.01.015. PMID: 23462590
Chen KT, Wu J, Noordhoff SM
Changgeng Yi Xue Za Zhi 1994 Jun;17(2):131-7. PMID: 8069735
Kaplan EN
Cleft Palate J 1975 Oct;12:356-68. PMID: 1058746

Therapy

Ku YC, Al-Malak M, Mulvihill L, Deleonibus A, Maasarani S, Bassiri Gharb B, Rampazzo A
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2023 Nov;86:300-314. Epub 2023 Sep 16 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2023.09.038. PMID: 37797378
Heliövaara A, Rautio J
Acta Odontol Scand 2005 Apr;63(2):123-6. doi: 10.1080/00016350510019766. PMID: 16134552
Cho BC, Kim JY, Yang JD, Lee DG, Chung HY, Park JW
J Craniofac Surg 2004 Jul;15(4):547-54; discussion 555. doi: 10.1097/00001665-200407000-00004. PMID: 15213528
Sommerlad BC
Plast Reconstr Surg 2003 Nov;112(6):1542-8. doi: 10.1097/01.PRS.0000085599.84458.D2. PMID: 14578783
Shapiro RS
Laryngoscope 1982 Feb;92(2):135-9. doi: 10.1002/lary.1982.92.2.135. PMID: 7162308

Prognosis

Smit JA, Mulder PP, de Graaf F, de Bakker BS, Breugem CC
Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2021 Sep;58(9):1121-1127. Epub 2020 Dec 3 doi: 10.1177/1055665620977760. PMID: 33267609Free PMC Article
Ersoy B, Yilmaz S, Sirinoğlu H, Celebiler O, Numanoğlu A
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2010 Aug;63(8):1382-4. Epub 2010 Feb 11 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2010.01.004. PMID: 20153276
Andersson EM, Sandvik L, Semb G, Abyholm F
Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg 2008;42(6):296-9. doi: 10.1080/02844310802299676. PMID: 18991171
Cho BC, Kim JY, Yang JD, Lee DG, Chung HY, Park JW
J Craniofac Surg 2004 Jul;15(4):547-54; discussion 555. doi: 10.1097/00001665-200407000-00004. PMID: 15213528
Malata CM, Cooter RD, Batchelor AG
Cleft Palate Craniofac J 1993 Nov;30(6):590-2. doi: 10.1597/1545-1569_1993_030_0590_scpwad_2.3.co_2. PMID: 8280740

Clinical prediction guides

Ren S, Ma L, Sun Z, Qian J
Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2014 May;51(3):314-9. Epub 2012 Sep 20 doi: 10.1597/12-051. PMID: 22994963
Abdel-Aziz M, El-Hoshy H, Naguib N, Talaat N
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2012 Jul;76(7):1012-6. Epub 2012 Apr 13 doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2012.03.021. PMID: 22503447
Andersson EM, Sandvik L, Abyholm F, Semb G
Cleft Palate Craniofac J 2010 Jul;47(4):335-42. doi: 10.1597/07-230.1. PMID: 19860491
Heliövaara A, Rautio J
Acta Odontol Scand 2005 Apr;63(2):123-6. doi: 10.1080/00016350510019766. PMID: 16134552
Cho BC, Kim JY, Yang JD, Lee DG, Chung HY, Park JW
J Craniofac Surg 2004 Jul;15(4):547-54; discussion 555. doi: 10.1097/00001665-200407000-00004. PMID: 15213528

Recent systematic reviews

Ku YC, Al-Malak M, Mulvihill L, Deleonibus A, Maasarani S, Bassiri Gharb B, Rampazzo A
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2023 Nov;86:300-314. Epub 2023 Sep 16 doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2023.09.038. PMID: 37797378

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