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Items: 12

1.

Severe combined immunodeficiency, autosomal recessive, T cell-negative, B cell-negative, NK cell-negative, due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a systemic purine metabolic disorder that primarily affects lymphocyte development, viability, and function. The clinical phenotypic spectrum includes: Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), often diagnosed by age six months and usually by age 12 months; Less severe "delayed" onset combined immune deficiency (CID), usually diagnosed between age one and ten years; "Late/adult onset" CID, diagnosed in the second to fourth decades; Benign "partial ADA deficiency" (very low or absent ADA activity in erythrocytes but greater ADA activity in nucleated cells), which is compatible with normal immune function. Infants with typical early-onset ADA-deficient SCID have failure to thrive and opportunistic infections associated with marked depletion of T, B, and NK lymphocytes, and an absence of both humoral and cellular immune function. If immune function is not restored, children with ADA-deficient SCID rarely survive beyond age one to two years. Infections in delayed- and late-onset types (commonly, recurrent otitis, sinusitis, and upper respiratory) may initially be less severe than those in individuals with ADA-deficient SCID; however, by the time of diagnosis these individuals often have chronic pulmonary insufficiency and may have autoimmune phenomena (cytopenias, anti-thyroid antibodies), allergies, and elevated serum concentration of IgE. The longer the disorder goes unrecognized, the more immune function deteriorates and the more likely are chronic sequelae of recurrent infection. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
354935
Concept ID:
C1863236
Disease or Syndrome
2.

X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection and neoplasia

XMEN is an X-linked recessive immunodeficiency characterized by CD4 (186940) lymphopenia, severe chronic viral infections, and defective T-lymphocyte activation (Li et al., 2011). Affected individuals have chronic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and are susceptible to the development of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Magnesium supplementation may be therapeutic (summary by Li et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
477076
Concept ID:
C3275445
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Immunodeficiency 36

Immunodeficiency-36 with lymphoproliferation (IMD36) is an autosomal dominant primary immunodeficiency with a highly heterogeneous clinical phenotype, characterized primarily by recurrent respiratory tract infections, lymphoproliferation, and antibody deficiency. Other features include growth retardation, mild neurodevelopmental delay, and autoimmunity. The major complication is development of B-cell lymphoma (Elkaim et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863371
Concept ID:
C4014934
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Lymphoproliferative syndrome 1

Lymphoproliferative syndrome-1 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset in early childhood of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated immune dysregulation, manifest as lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Hodgkin disease, and/or hypogammaglobulinemia. Autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia or renal disease, may also occur. Patients show a high EBV viral load and decreased invariant natural killer T cells. It is unknown whether patients with ITK mutations are intrinsically susceptible to development of lymphoma or dysgammaglobulinemia in the absence of EBV infection (summary by Stepensky et al., 2011; Linka et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
765548
Concept ID:
C3552634
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Immunodeficiency 64

Immunodeficiency-64 with lymphoproliferation (IMD64) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset of recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in early childhood. Laboratory studies show variably decreased numbers of T cells, with lesser deficiencies of B and NK cells. There is impaired T-cell proliferation and activation; functional defects in B cells and NK cells may also be observed. Patients have increased susceptibility to EBV infection and may develop lymphoproliferation or EBV-associated lymphoma. Some patients may develop features of autoimmunity (summary by Salzer et al., 2016, Mao et al., 2018, and Winter et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1684716
Concept ID:
C5231402
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Immunodeficiency 76

Immunodeficiency-76 (IMD76) is an autosomal recessive primary immunologic disorder characterized by onset of recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in early childhood. Laboratory studies show T-cell lymphopenia and may show variable B-cell or immunoglobulin abnormalities. More variable features found in some patients include lymphoma and neurologic features. Although bone marrow transplantation may be curative, many patients die in childhood (summary by Lyszkiewicz et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1781281
Concept ID:
C5543004
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Immunodeficiency 105

Immunodeficiency-105 (IMD105) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of recurrent infections in early infancy. Manifestations may include pneumonia, dermatitis, and lymphadenopathy. B-cell lymphoma was reported in 1 patient. Laboratory studies show decreased or absent numbers of nonfunctional T cells, normal or increased levels of B cells, hypogammaglobulinemia, and normal or low NK cells. The disorder is caused by a deficiency of transmembrane protein CD45 (PTPRC) on leukocytes, which plays an important role in T- and B-cell development (Cale et al., 1997; Kung et al., 2000). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SCID, see 601457. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1809425
Concept ID:
C5677005
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Immunodeficiency 84

Immunodeficiency-84 (IMD84) is an autosomal dominant primary immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent sinopulmonary infections from childhood associated with low levels of B cells and impaired early B-cell development. There may also be variable T-cell abnormalities. Patients with IMD84 have increased susceptibility to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and may develop lymphoma in adulthood (summary by Yamashita et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794150
Concept ID:
C5561940
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Immunodeficiency 82 with systemic inflammation

Immunodeficiency-82 with systemic inflammation (IMD82) is a complex autosomal dominant immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent infections with various organisms, as well as noninfectious inflammation manifest as lymphocytic organ infiltration with gastritis, colitis, and lung, liver, CNS, or skin disease. One of the more common features is inflammation of the stomach and bowel. Most patients develop symptoms in infancy or early childhood; the severity is variable. There may be accompanying fever, elevated white blood cell count, decreased B cells, hypogammaglobulinemia, increased C-reactive protein (CRP; 123260), and a generalized hyperinflammatory state. Immunologic workup shows variable B- and T-cell abnormalities such as skewed subgroups. Patients have a propensity for the development of lymphoma, usually in adulthood. At the molecular level, the disorder results from a gain-of-function mutation that leads to constitutive and enhanced activation of the intracellular inflammatory signaling pathway. Treatment with SYK inhibitors rescued human cell abnormalities and resulted in clinical improvement in mice (Wang et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1781752
Concept ID:
C5543581
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Joint contractures, osteochondromas, and B-cell lymphoma

Joint contractures, osteochondromas, and B-cell lymphoma (JCOSL) is an autosomal recessive systemic disorder characterized by the development of painless fixed contractures of the joints in early childhood. There is evidence of abnormal chondrocyte homeostasis, resulting in contractures, osteopenia, and the development of osteochondromas. Laboratory studies show abnormal levels and function of B- and T-cell subsets, and patients can develop B-cell lymphomas or malignancies. Despite the abnormalities in immunologic cells, immunodeficiency is not a feature of the disease, suggesting that it can be classified as a 'primary immune regulatory disorder' (Sharma et al., 2022). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1824078
Concept ID:
C5774305
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Leukemia/lymphoma, b-cell, 2

MedGen UID:
854626
Concept ID:
C3887918
Neoplastic Process
12.

B-cell lymphoma

A type of lymphoma that originates in B-cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
86953
Concept ID:
C0079731
Neoplastic Process
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