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Items: 6

1.

Severe combined immunodeficiency, autosomal recessive, T cell-negative, B cell-negative, NK cell-negative, due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a systemic purine metabolic disorder that primarily affects lymphocyte development, viability, and function. The clinical phenotypic spectrum includes: Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), often diagnosed by age six months and usually by age 12 months; Less severe "delayed" onset combined immune deficiency (CID), usually diagnosed between age one and ten years; "Late/adult onset" CID, diagnosed in the second to fourth decades; Benign "partial ADA deficiency" (very low or absent ADA activity in erythrocytes but greater ADA activity in nucleated cells), which is compatible with normal immune function. Infants with typical early-onset ADA-deficient SCID have failure to thrive and opportunistic infections associated with marked depletion of T, B, and NK lymphocytes, and an absence of both humoral and cellular immune function. If immune function is not restored, children with ADA-deficient SCID rarely survive beyond age one to two years. Infections in delayed- and late-onset types (commonly, recurrent otitis, sinusitis, and upper respiratory) may initially be less severe than those in individuals with ADA-deficient SCID; however, by the time of diagnosis these individuals often have chronic pulmonary insufficiency and may have autoimmune phenomena (cytopenias, anti-thyroid antibodies), allergies, and elevated serum concentration of IgE. The longer the disorder goes unrecognized, the more immune function deteriorates and the more likely are chronic sequelae of recurrent infection. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
354935
Concept ID:
C1863236
Disease or Syndrome
2.

DK1-congenital disorder of glycosylation

DOLK-congenital disorder of glycosylation (DOLK-CDG, formerly known as congenital disorder of glycosylation type Im) is an inherited condition that often affects the heart but can also involve other body systems. The pattern and severity of this disorder's signs and symptoms vary among affected individuals.

Individuals with DOLK-CDG typically develop signs and symptoms of the condition during infancy or early childhood. Nearly all individuals with DOLK-CDG develop a weakened and enlarged heart (dilated cardiomyopathy). Other frequent signs and symptoms include recurrent seizures; developmental delay; poor muscle tone (hypotonia); and dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis). Less commonly, affected individuals can have distinctive facial features, kidney disease, hormonal abnormalities, or eye problems.

Individuals with DOLK-CDG typically do not survive into adulthood, often because of complications related to dilated cardiomyopathy, and some do not survive past infancy. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
332072
Concept ID:
C1835849
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Majeed syndrome

Majeed syndrome (MJDS) is an autosomal recessive pediatric multisystem autoinflammatory disorder characterized by chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and congenital dyserythropoietic anemia; some patients may also develop neutrophilic dermatosis. Additional features may include fever, failure to thrive, and neutropenia. Laboratory studies show elevated inflammatory markers consistent with activation of the proinflammatory IL1 (147760) pathway (summary by Ferguson and El-Shanti, 2021). Genetic Heterogeneity of Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis See also CRMO2 (612852), caused by mutation in the IL1RN gene (147679) on chromosome 2q14; and CRMO3 (259680), caused by mutation in the IL1R1 gene (147810) on chromosome 2q12. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
351273
Concept ID:
C1864997
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Yao syndrome

Yao syndrome (YAOS) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by periodic fever, dermatitis, arthritis, and swelling of the distal extremities, as well as gastrointestinal and sicca-like symptoms. The disorder is associated with specific NOD2 variants (and Shen, 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934587
Concept ID:
C4310620
Disease or Syndrome
5.

VEXAS syndrome

VEXAS (vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory, somatic syndrome) is an adult-onset inflammatory disease that primarily affects males and is caused by somatic, not germline, mutations. The disorder is characterized by adult onset of rheumatologic symptoms at a mean age of 64 years. Features include recurrent fevers, pulmonary and dermatologic inflammatory manifestations, vasculitis, deep vein thrombosis, arthralgias, and ear and nose chondritis. Laboratory studies indicate hematologic abnormalities, including macrocytic anemia, as well as increased levels of acute-phase reactants; about half of patients have positive autoantibodies. Bone marrow biopsy shows degenerative vacuolization restricted to myeloid and erythroid precursor cells, as well as variable hematopoietic dyspoiesis and dysplasias. The condition does not respond to rheumatologic medications and the features may result in premature death (summary by Beck et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1765785
Concept ID:
C5435753
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Inflammatory abnormality of the skin

The presence of inflammation of the skin. That is, an abnormality of the skin resulting from the local accumulation of fluid, plasma proteins, and leukocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
849741
Concept ID:
C3875321
Disease or Syndrome
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