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Items: 17

1.

Deafness-encephaloneuropathy-obesity-valvulopathy syndrome

Primary coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency is usually associated with multisystem involvement, including neurologic manifestations such as fatal neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia; a late-onset slowly progressive multiple-system atrophy-like phenotype (neurodegeneration with autonomic failure and various combinations of parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, and pyramidal dysfunction); and dystonia, spasticity, seizures, and intellectual disability. Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS), the hallmark renal manifestation, is often the initial manifestation either as isolated renal involvement that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or associated with encephalopathy (seizures, stroke-like episodes, severe neurologic impairment) resulting in early death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), retinopathy or optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss can also be seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
766268
Concept ID:
C3553354
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 47

AP-4-associated hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), also known as AP-4 deficiency syndrome, is a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a progressive, complex spastic paraplegia with onset typically in infancy or early childhood. Early-onset hypotonia evolves into progressive lower-extremity spasticity. The majority of children become nonambulatory and usually wheelchair bound. Over time spasticity progresses to involve the upper extremities, resulting in a spastic tetraplegia. Associated complications include dysphagia, contractures, foot deformities, dysregulation of bladder and bowel function, and a pseudobulbar affect. About 50% of affected individuals have seizures. Postnatal microcephaly (usually in the -2SD to -3SD range) is common. All have developmental delay. Speech development is significantly impaired and many affected individuals remain nonverbal. Intellectual disability in older children is usually moderate to severe. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
481368
Concept ID:
C3279738
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 51

AP-4-associated hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), also known as AP-4 deficiency syndrome, is a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by a progressive, complex spastic paraplegia with onset typically in infancy or early childhood. Early-onset hypotonia evolves into progressive lower-extremity spasticity. The majority of children become nonambulatory and usually wheelchair bound. Over time spasticity progresses to involve the upper extremities, resulting in a spastic tetraplegia. Associated complications include dysphagia, contractures, foot deformities, dysregulation of bladder and bowel function, and a pseudobulbar affect. About 50% of affected individuals have seizures. Postnatal microcephaly (usually in the -2SD to -3SD range) is common. All have developmental delay. Speech development is significantly impaired and many affected individuals remain nonverbal. Intellectual disability in older children is usually moderate to severe. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
462406
Concept ID:
C3151056
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 11

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) is a group of several conditions characterized by abnormally high levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar. These forms of diabetes typically begin before age 30, although they can occur later in life. In MODY, elevated blood glucose arises from reduced production of insulin, which is a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps regulate blood glucose levels. Specifically, insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells, where it is used as an energy source.

RCAD is associated with a combination of diabetes and kidney or urinary tract abnormalities (unrelated to the elevated blood glucose), most commonly fluid-filled sacs (cysts) in the kidneys. However, the signs and symptoms are variable, even within families, and not everyone with RCAD has both features. Affected individuals may have other features unrelated to diabetes, such as abnormalities of the pancreas or liver or a form of arthritis called gout.

GCK-MODY is a very mild type of the condition. People with this type have slightly elevated blood glucose levels, particularly in the morning before eating (fasting blood glucose). However, affected individuals often have no symptoms related to the disorder, and diabetes-related complications are extremely rare.

The different types of MODY are distinguished by their genetic causes. The most common types are HNF1A-MODY (also known as MODY3), accounting for 50 to 70 percent of cases, and GCK-MODY (MODY2), accounting for 30 to 50 percent of cases. Less frequent types include HNF4A-MODY (MODY1) and renal cysts and diabetes (RCAD) syndrome (also known as HNF1B-MODY or MODY5), which each account for 5 to 10 percent of cases. At least ten other types have been identified, and these are very rare.

HNF1A-MODY and HNF4A-MODY have similar signs and symptoms that develop slowly over time. Early signs and symptoms in these types are caused by high blood glucose and may include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, weight loss, and recurrent skin infections. Over time uncontrolled high blood glucose can damage small blood vessels in the eyes and kidneys. Damage to the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina) causes a condition known as diabetic retinopathy that can lead to vision loss and eventual blindness. Kidney damage (diabetic nephropathy) can lead to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While these two types of MODY are very similar, certain features are particular to each type. For example, babies with HNF4A-MODY tend to weigh more than average or have abnormally low blood glucose at birth, even though other signs of the condition do not occur until childhood or young adulthood. People with HNF1A-MODY have a higher-than-average risk of developing noncancerous (benign) liver tumors known as hepatocellular adenomas. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
461968
Concept ID:
C3150618
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Intellectual developmental disorder with autism and macrocephaly

CHD8-related neurodevelopmental disorder with overgrowth (CHD8-NDD) is characterized by generalized overgrowth, developmental delay / intellectual disability (DD/ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), neuropsychiatric issues, neurologic problems, sleep disturbance, and gastrointestinal issues The most common findings are the development of macrocephaly (most often during infancy) and tall stature (most typically during puberty), which is often accompanied by ASD and/or DD/ID. Most, if not all, affected individuals have some degree of DD, most commonly speech and motor delays. When present, ID is most often in the mild-to-moderate range. Sleep disturbance is characterized by difficulty with both initiation (delayed sleep onset) and maintenance (frequent night awakenings) of sleep. The most common gastrointestinal issue is constipation with or without periods of diarrhea. Less common features are hypotonia (about 30% of affected individuals), seizures (10%-15%), dystonia (rare), and Chiari I malformation (rare). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
767287
Concept ID:
C3554373
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Bardet-biedl syndrome 21

BBS21 is an autosomal recessive ciliopathy characterized by obesity, postaxial polydactyly, retinal degeneration, and mild cognitive impairment (Heon et al., 2016; Khan et al., 2016). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Bardet-Biedl syndrome, see BBS1 (209900). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1374358
Concept ID:
C4319932
Disease or Syndrome
7.

X-linked central congenital hypothyroidism with late-onset testicular enlargement

Central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement (CHTE) is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed pubertal testosterone rise, adult macroorchidism, variable prolactin deficiency, and occasional transient partial GH deficiency. Some carrier females also exhibit central hypothyroidism and mild prolactin deficiency. Inter- and intrafamilial variability has been observed (summary by Joustra et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
763877
Concept ID:
C3550963
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Motor developmental delay due to 14q32.2 paternally expressed gene defect

Temple syndrome is a short stature disorder of imprinting. The cardinal features are low birth weight, hypotonia and motor delay, feeding problems early in life, early puberty, and significantly reduced final height. Facial features include a broad forehead and short nose with a wide nasal tip, and the majority of patients have small hands and feet. However, many of the clinical features are nonspecific, making diagnosis difficult. In addition, isodisomy may uncover recessive disorders, which may influence the phenotype in maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14 (UPD14mat) cases (summary by Ioannides et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863995
Concept ID:
C4015558
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 52

MedGen UID:
1615839
Concept ID:
C4540478
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
10.

Developmental delay with or without intellectual impairment or behavioral abnormalities

Developmental delay with or without intellectual impairment or behavioral abnormalities (DDIB) is an autosomal dominant disorder with a nonspecific phenotype of developmental delay. Additional features may include neonatal feeding problems, hypotonia, and dysmorphic facial features (Dulovic-Mahlow et al., 2019; van Woerden et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794214
Concept ID:
C5562004
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Intellectual developmental disorder, X-linked 108

X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-108 (MRX108) is characterized by early hypotonia, global developmental delay, and moderately to severely impaired intellectual development. Brisk tendon reflexes, variable facial dysmorphism, and fifth finger clinodactyly may be present (Khayat et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1680544
Concept ID:
C5193009
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Myofibrillar myopathy 11

Myofibrillar myopathy-11 (MFM11) is an autosomal recessive skeletal muscle disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness in the first decade of life. Some patients may present at birth with hypotonia and feeding difficulties, whereas others present later in mid-childhood. Although most patients show delayed walking at 2 to 3 years, all remain ambulatory into adulthood. More variable features may include decreased respiratory forced vital capacity, variable cardiac features, and calf hypertrophy. Skeletal muscle biopsy shows myopathic changes with variation in fiber size, type 1 fiber predominance, centralized nuclei, eccentrically placed core-like lesions, and distortion of the myofibrillary pattern with Z-line streaming and abnormal myofibrillar aggregates or inclusions (summary by Donkervoort et al., 2020). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1782465
Concept ID:
C5543038
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome-like

Den Hoed-de Boer-Voisin syndrome (DHDBV) is characterized by global developmental delay with moderately to severely impaired intellectual development, poor or absent speech, and delayed motor skills. Although the severity of the disorder varies, many patients are nonverbal and have hypotonia with inability to sit or walk. Early-onset epilepsy is common and may be refractory to treatment, leading to epileptic encephalopathy and further interruption of developmental progress. Most patients have feeding difficulties with poor overall growth and dysmorphic facial features, as well as significant dental anomalies resembling amelogenesis imperfecta. The phenotype is reminiscent of Kohlschutter-Tonz syndrome (KTZS; 226750). More variable features of DHDBV include visual defects, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific involvement of other organ systems (summary by den Hoed et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1781649
Concept ID:
C5543202
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Joubert syndrome 39

Joubert syndrome-39 (JBTS39) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder with variable manifestations. Most affected individuals have developmental delay with poor speech and retinal dystrophy with abnormal eye movements. Brain imaging shows the pathognomonic 'molar tooth sign,' which reflects abnormal cerebellar formation (Van De Weghe et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Joubert syndrome, see JBTS1 (213300). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794210
Concept ID:
C5562000
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and neuropsychiatric disorders

Developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and neuropsychiatric disorders (DEDBANP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mild global developmental delay and normal or variably impaired intellectual development. Most individuals have behavioral or neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and executive functioning deficits. Additional features may include speech delay, dysmorphic features, hypotonia, sleep disturbances, and seizures (Vitobello et al., 2022). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1823997
Concept ID:
C5774224
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities

Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, lymphoid hyperplasia, and persistent fetal hemoglobin

Macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, lymphoid hyperplasia, and persistent fetal hemoglobin (MNDLFH) is characterized by clinically significant pharyngeal lymphoid hypertrophy, with adenoid overgrowth, frequent upper airway infections, and sleep apnea. Macrocephaly without structural brain abnormalities is present, and patients exhibit increased weight for height as well as delayed gross motor and impaired intellectual development; autistic features and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder have also been reported. An increased fraction of fetal hemoglobin has been observed in some patients (Ohishi et al., 2020; von der Lippe et al., 2022). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1802903
Concept ID:
C5676928
Disease or Syndrome
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