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Sleep apnea

MedGen UID:
11458
Concept ID:
C0037315
Disease or Syndrome
Synonym: Sleep apnea syndrome
SNOMED CT: Sleep apnea (73430006); SAS - Sleep apnea syndrome (73430006); Sleep hypopnea (73430006); Sleep apnea syndrome (73430006)
 
HPO: HP:0010535
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0005296

Definition

An intermittent cessation of airflow at the mouth and nose during sleep is known as sleep apnea. Apneas that last at least 10 seconds are considered significant, but individuals with sleep apnea may experience apneas lasting from 20 seconds up to 2 or 3 minutes. Patients may have up to 15 events per hour of sleep. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Craniofacial dysostosis
MedGen UID:
1162
Concept ID:
C0010273
Disease or Syndrome
Crouzon syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by craniosynostosis causing secondary alterations of the facial bones and facial structure. Common features include hypertelorism, exophthalmos and external strabismus, parrot-beaked nose, short upper lip, hypoplastic maxilla, and a relative mandibular prognathism (Reardon et al., 1994; Glaser et al., 2000).
Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-II
MedGen UID:
7734
Concept ID:
C0026705
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II; also known as Hunter syndrome) is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation. The vast majority of affected individuals are male; on rare occasion heterozygous females manifest findings. Age of onset, disease severity, and rate of progression vary significantly among affected males. In those with early progressive disease, CNS involvement (manifest primarily by progressive cognitive deterioration), progressive airway disease, and cardiac disease usually result in death in the first or second decade of life. In those with slowly progressive disease, the CNS is not (or is minimally) affected, although the effect of GAG accumulation on other organ systems may be early progressive to the same degree as in those who have progressive cognitive decline. Survival into the early adult years with normal intelligence is common in the slowly progressing form of the disease. Additional findings in both forms of MPS II include: short stature; macrocephaly with or without communicating hydrocephalus; macroglossia; hoarse voice; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hepatosplenomegaly; dysostosis multiplex; spinal stenosis; and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Mucopolysaccharidosis type 6
MedGen UID:
44514
Concept ID:
C0026709
Disease or Syndrome
Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS6) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. Clinical features and severity are variable, but usually include short stature, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, stiff joints, corneal clouding, cardiac abnormalities, and facial dysmorphism. Intelligence is usually normal (Azevedo et al., 2004).
Prader-Willi syndrome
MedGen UID:
46057
Concept ID:
C0032897
Disease or Syndrome
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe hypotonia and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed in later infancy or early childhood by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity (unless eating is externally controlled). Motor milestones and language development are delayed. All individuals have some degree of cognitive impairment. A distinctive behavioral phenotype (with temper tantrums, stubbornness, manipulative behavior, and obsessive-compulsive characteristics) is common. Hypogonadism is present in both males and females and manifests as genital hypoplasia, incomplete pubertal development, and, in most, infertility. Short stature is common (if not treated with growth hormone); characteristic facial features, strabismus, and scoliosis are often present.
Sialuria
MedGen UID:
137980
Concept ID:
C0342853
Disease or Syndrome
Sialuria is a rare inborn error of metabolism in which excessive free sialic acid is synthesized. Clinical features include hepatosplenomegaly, coarse facial features, and varying degrees of developmental delay (summary by Enns et al., 2001).
Apnea, central sleep
MedGen UID:
99249
Concept ID:
C0520680
Disease or Syndrome
Sleep apnea results from a temporary loss of the central drive to the muscles responsible for breathing.
Glaucoma-sleep apnea syndrome
MedGen UID:
330749
Concept ID:
C1842025
Disease or Syndrome
Glaucoma-sleep apnea syndrome is characterized by sleep apnoea associated with glaucoma. It has been described in five members of a family (the mother and four of her children).
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1
MedGen UID:
400169
Concept ID:
C1862939
Disease or Syndrome
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the death of motor neurons in the brain, brainstem, and spinal cord, resulting in fatal paralysis. ALS usually begins with asymmetric involvement of the muscles in middle adult life. Approximately 10% of ALS cases are familial (Siddique and Deng, 1996). ALS is sometimes referred to as 'Lou Gehrig disease' after the famous American baseball player who was diagnosed with the disorder. Rowland and Shneider (2001) and Kunst (2004) provided extensive reviews of ALS. Some forms of ALS occur with frontotemporal dementia (FTD); see 105500. Ranganathan et al. (2020) provided a detailed review of the genes involved in different forms of ALS with FTD, noting that common disease pathways involve disturbances in RNA processing, autophagy, the ubiquitin proteasome system, the unfolded protein response, and intracellular trafficking. The current understanding of ALS and FTD is that some forms of these disorders represent a spectrum of disease with converging mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Familial ALS is distinct from a form of ALS with dementia reported in cases on Guam (105500) (Espinosa et al., 1962; Husquinet and Franck, 1980), in which the histology is different and dementia and parkinsonism complicate the clinical picture. Genetic Heterogeneity of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ALS is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, with several causative genes and mapped loci. ALS6 (608030) is caused by mutation in the FUS gene (137070) on chromosome 16p11; ALS8 (608627) is caused by mutation in the VAPB gene (605704) on chromosome 13; ALS9 (611895) is caused by mutation in the ANG gene (105850) on chromosome 14q11; ALS10 (612069) is caused by mutation in the TARDBP gene (605078) on 1p36; ALS11 (612577) is caused by mutation in the FIG4 gene (609390) on chromosome 6q21; ALS12 (613435) is caused by mutation in the OPTN gene (602432) on chromosome 10p13; ALS15 (300857) is caused by mutation in the UBQLN2 gene (300264) on chromosome Xp11; ALS18 (614808) is caused by mutation in the PFN1 gene (176610) on chromosome 17p13; ALS19 (615515) is caused by mutation in the ERBB4 gene (600543) on chromosome 2q34; ALS20 (615426) is caused by mutation in the HNRNPA1 gene (164017) on chromosome 12q13; ALS21 (606070) is caused by mutation in the MATR3 gene (164015) on chromosome 5q31; ALS22 (616208) is caused by mutation in the TUBA4A gene (191110) on chromosome 2q35; ALS23 (617839) is caused by mutation in the ANXA11 gene (602572) on chromosome 10q23; ALS26 (619133) is caused by mutation in the TIA1 gene (603518) on chromosome 2p13; ALS27 (620285) is caused by mutation in the SPTLC1 gene (605712) on chromosome 9q22; and ALS28 (620452) is caused by mutation in the LRP12 gene (618299) on chromosome 8q22. Loci associated with ALS have been found on chromosomes 18q21 (ALS3; 606640) and 20p13 (ALS7; 608031). Intermediate-length polyglutamine repeat expansions in the ATXN2 gene (601517) contribute to susceptibility to ALS (ALS13; 183090). Susceptibility to ALS24 (617892) is conferred by mutation in the NEK1 gene (604588) on chromosome 4q33, and susceptibility to ALS25 (617921) is conferred by mutation in the KIF5A gene (602821) on chromosome 12q13. Susceptibility to ALS has been associated with mutations in other genes, including deletions or insertions in the gene encoding the heavy neurofilament subunit (NEFH; 162230); deletions in the gene encoding peripherin (PRPH; 170710); and mutations in the dynactin gene (DCTN1; 601143). Some forms of ALS show juvenile onset. See juvenile-onset ALS2 (205100), caused by mutation in the alsin (606352) gene on 2q33; ALS4 (602433), caused by mutation in the senataxin gene (SETX; 608465) on 9q34; ALS5 (602099), caused by mutation in the SPG11 gene (610844) on 15q21; and ALS16 (614373), caused by mutation in the SIGMAR1 gene (601978) on 9p13.
Potocki-Lupski syndrome
MedGen UID:
444010
Concept ID:
C2931246
Disease or Syndrome
Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) is characterized by cognitive, behavioral, and medical manifestations. Cognitively, most individuals present with developmental delay, later meeting criteria for moderate intellectual disability. Behaviorally, issues with attention, hyperactivity, withdrawal, and anxiety may be seen. Some individuals meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder. Medically, hypotonia, oropharyngeal dysphagia leading to failure to thrive, congenital heart disease, hypoglycemia associated with growth hormone deficiency, and mildly dysmorphic facial features are observed. Medical manifestations typically lead to identification of PTLS in infancy; however, those with only behavioral and cognitive manifestations may be identified in later childhood.
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481473
Concept ID:
C3279843
Disease or Syndrome
Mosaic variegated aneuploidy syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by poor growth and variable phenotypic manifestations, such as facial dysmorphism and congenital heart defects, associated with mosaic aneuploidies resulting from defects in cell division (summary by Snape et al., 2011). See also MVA1 (257300), caused by mutation in the BUB1B gene (602860) on chromosome 15q15.
Dysmorphism-conductive hearing loss-heart defect syndrome
MedGen UID:
767688
Concept ID:
C3554774
Disease or Syndrome
A rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with characteristics of distinctive facial appearance (low frontal hairline, bilateral ptosis, prominent eyes, flat midface, broad, ?at nares, Cupid''s bow upper lip vermilion and small, low-set, posteriorly rotated ears), cleft palate, conductive hearing loss, heart defects (atrial or ventricular septal defect) and mild developmental delay/intellectual disability.
Congenital microcephaly - severe encephalopathy - progressive cerebral atrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
816301
Concept ID:
C3809971
Disease or Syndrome
Asparagine synthetase deficiency (ASD) mainly presents as a triad of congenital microcephaly, severe developmental delay, and axial hypotonia followed by spastic quadriplegia. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine level can help the clinician in differentiating this disorder from others. In most cases age of onset of apnea, excessive irritability, and seizures is soon after birth. Affected individuals typically do not acquire any developmental milestones. Spastic quadriplegia can lead to severe contractures of the limbs and neurogenic scoliosis. Feeding difficulties (gastroesophageal reflux disease, frequent vomiting, swallowing dysfunction, and gastroesophageal incoordination) are a significant problem in most affected individuals. A majority have cortical blindness. MRI findings are nonspecific but may include generalized atrophy and simplified gyral pattern.
X-linked acrogigantism due to Xq26 microduplication
MedGen UID:
856021
Concept ID:
C3891556
Disease or Syndrome
X-linked acrogigantism is the occurrence of pituitary gigantism in an individual heterozygous or hemizygous for a germline or somatic duplication of GPR101. X-linked acrogigantism is characterized by acceleration of linear growth in early childhood – in most cases during the first two years of life – due to growth hormone (GH) excess. Most individuals with X-linked acrogigantism present with associated hyperprolactinemia due to a mixed GH- and prolactin-secreting pituitary adenoma with or without associated hyperplasia; less commonly they develop diffuse hyperplasia of the GH- and prolactin-secreting pituitary cells without a pituitary adenoma. Most affected individuals are females. Growth acceleration is the main presenting feature; other frequently observed clinical features include enlargement of hands and feet, coarsening of the facial features, and increased appetite. Neurologic signs or symptoms are rarely present. Untreated X-linked acrogigantism can lead to markedly increased stature, with obvious severe physical and psychological sequelae.
Cognitive impairment - coarse facies - heart defects - obesity - pulmonary involvement - short stature - skeletal dysplasia syndrome
MedGen UID:
894554
Concept ID:
C4085597
Disease or Syndrome
CHOPS syndrome is a disorder involving multiple abnormalities that are present from birth (congenital). The name "CHOPS" is an abbreviation for a list of features of the disorder including cognitive impairment, coarse facial features, heart defects, obesity, lung (pulmonary) involvement, short stature, and skeletal abnormalities.\n\nChildren with CHOPS syndrome have intellectual disability and delayed development of skills such as sitting and walking. Characteristic facial features include a round face; thick hair; thick eyebrows that grow together in the middle (synophrys); wide-set, bulging eyes with long eyelashes; a short nose; and down-turned corners of the mouth.\n\nMost affected individuals are born with a heart defect called patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The ductus arteriosus is a connection between two major arteries, the aorta and the pulmonary artery. This connection is open during fetal development and normally closes shortly after birth. However, the ductus arteriosus remains open, or patent, in babies with PDA. If untreated, this heart defect causes infants to breathe rapidly, feed poorly, and gain weight slowly; in severe cases, it can lead to heart failure. Multiple heart abnormalities have sometimes been found in children with CHOPS syndrome. In addition to PDA, affected individuals may have ventricular septal defect, which is a defect in the muscular wall (septum) that separates the right and left sides of the heart's lower chamber.\n\nPeople with CHOPS syndrome have abnormalities of the throat and airways that cause momentary cessation of breathing while asleep (obstructive sleep apnea). These abnormalities can also cause affected individuals to breathe food or fluids into the lungs accidentally, which can lead to a potentially life-threatening bacterial lung infection (aspiration pneumonia) and chronic lung disease. Affected individuals are shorter than more than 97 percent of their peers and are overweight for their height. They also have skeletal differences including unusually short fingers and toes (brachydactyly) and abnormally-shaped spinal bones (vertebrae).\n\nOther features that can occur in CHOPS syndrome include a small head size (microcephaly); hearing loss; clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract); a single, horseshoe-shaped kidney; and, in affected males, undescended testes (cryptorchidism).
Seizures-scoliosis-macrocephaly syndrome
MedGen UID:
909039
Concept ID:
C4225248
Disease or Syndrome
Seizures, scoliosis, and macrocephaly/microcephaly syndrome (SSMS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early infancy, impaired intellectual development, behavioral problems, poor or absent speech, seizures, dysmorphic facial features with macro- or microcephaly, and skeletal abnormalities, including scoliosis and delayed bone age. Other features may include hypotonia, gastrointestinal problems, and exostoses (summary by Gentile et al., 2019).
PMP22-RAI1 contiguous gene duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
894862
Concept ID:
C4225255
Disease or Syndrome
Yuan-Harel-Lupski syndrome is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay and early-onset peripheral neuropathy. The disorder comprises features of both demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A; 118220), which results from duplication of the PMP22 gene on 17p12, and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS; 610883), which results from duplication of a slightly proximal region on 17p11.2 that includes the RAI1 gene. These 2 loci are about 2.5 Mb apart. The resultant YUHAL phenotype may be more severe in comparison to the individual contributions of each gene, with particularly early onset of peripheral neuropathy and features of both central and peripheral nervous system involvement (summary by Yuan et al., 2015).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without anomalies of the brain, eye, or heart
MedGen UID:
934739
Concept ID:
C4310772
Disease or Syndrome
RERE-related disorders are characterized by neurodevelopmental problems with or without structural anomalies of the eyes, heart, kidneys, and genitourinary tract and mild sensorineural hearing loss. Hypotonia and feeding problems are common among affected individuals. Developmental delay and intellectual disability range from mild to profound. Behavior problems may include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, self-injurious behavior, and autism spectrum disorder. A variety of eye anomalies (coloboma, optic nerve anomalies, microphthalmia, and/or Peter's anomaly) and vision issues (myopia, anisometropia, astigmatism, exotropia, esotropia) have been reported. Congenital heart defects, most commonly septal defects, have also been described. Genitourinary abnormalities include vesicoureteral reflux, and cryptorchidism and hypospadias in males. Sensorineural hearing loss can be unilateral or bilateral.
SIN3A-related intellectual disability syndrome due to a point mutation
MedGen UID:
934771
Concept ID:
C4310804
Disease or Syndrome
Witteveen-Kolk syndrome (WITKOS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with characteristic distinctive facial features, microcephaly, short stature, and mildly impaired intellectual development with delayed cognitive and motor development and subtle anomalies on MRI-brain imaging (summary by Balasubramanian et al., 2021).
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency 32
MedGen UID:
1617600
Concept ID:
C4540029
Disease or Syndrome
Combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency-32 is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by onset of delayed psychomotor development and developmental regression in infancy. Affected individuals have multiple variable symptoms, including poor or absent speech, inability to walk, and abnormal movements. Brain imaging shows T2-weighted abnormalities in the basal ganglia and brainstem consistent with Leigh syndrome (256000). Patient cells showed decreased activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, I, III, and IV, as well as impaired mitochondrial translation (summary by Lake et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of combined oxidative phosphorylation deficiency, see COXPD1 (609060).
Geleophysic dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
1615724
Concept ID:
C4540511
Congenital Abnormality
Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with ADAMTSL2-related geleophysic dysplasia.
Joubert syndrome 35
MedGen UID:
1648453
Concept ID:
C4748442
Disease or Syndrome
Joubert syndrome-35 (JBTS35) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brain malformations that result in developmental delay, oculomotor apraxia, and hypotonia. Some patients have renal and retinal involvement (Alkanderi et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Joubert syndrome, see JBTS1 (213300).
Infantile hypotonia-oculomotor anomalies-hyperkinetic movements-developmental delay syndrome
MedGen UID:
1648431
Concept ID:
C4748715
Disease or Syndrome
Baker-Gordon syndrome (BAGOS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by infantile hypotonia, ophthalmic abnormalities, moderate to profound global developmental delay, poor or absent speech, behavioral abnormalities, hyperkinetic movements, and EEG abnormalities in the absence of overt seizures (summary by Baker et al., 2018).
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 6
MedGen UID:
1648496
Concept ID:
C4748759
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex 1 deficiency, nuclear type 10
MedGen UID:
1648426
Concept ID:
C4748768
Disease or Syndrome
Khan-Khan-Katsanis syndrome
MedGen UID:
1682553
Concept ID:
C5193110
Disease or Syndrome
Khan-Khan-Katsanis syndrome (3KS) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder with variable involvement of the ocular, renal, skeletal, and sometimes cardiac systems. Affected individuals present at birth with multiple congenital anomalies, defects in urogenital and limb morphogenesis, poor overall growth with microcephaly, and global developmental delay (summary by Khan et al., 2019).
Hypotonia, hypoventilation, impaired intellectual development, dysautonomia, epilepsy, and eye abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1672905
Concept ID:
C5193124
Disease or Syndrome
Hypotonia, hypoventilation, impaired intellectual development, dysautonomia, epilepsy, and eye abnormalities (HIDEA) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by global developmental delay, poor or absent speech, hypotonia, variable ocular movement and visual abnormalities, and respiratory difficulties, including hypoventilation, and sleep apnea. Patients may have significant breathing problems during respiratory infections that may lead to early death (summary by Rahikkala et al., 2019).
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia, type 13
MedGen UID:
1684708
Concept ID:
C5231425
Disease or Syndrome
Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 13 (PCH13) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay, impaired intellectual development with absent speech, microcephaly, and progressive atrophy of the cerebellar vermis and brainstem. Additional features, including seizures and visual impairment, are variable (summary by Uwineza et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PCH, see PCH1A (607596).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with relative macrocephaly and with or without cardiac or endocrine anomalies
MedGen UID:
1714169
Concept ID:
C5394221
Disease or Syndrome
Nabais Sa-de Vries syndrome type 2 (NSDVS2) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from birth and distinctive dysmorphic facial features. Most patients have additional anomalies, including congenital heart defects, sleep disturbances, hypotonia, and variable endocrine abnormalities, such as hypothyroidism (summary by Nabais Sa et al., 2020).
Cleft palate, proliferative retinopathy, and developmental delay
MedGen UID:
1765503
Concept ID:
C5436739
Disease or Syndrome
Cleft palate, proliferative retinopathy, and developmental delay (CPPRDD) is characterized by motor and speech delay, with intellectual disability ranging from mild to severe. Brain imaging shows ventriculomegaly as well as other malformations (Harel et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with spasticity, cataracts, and cerebellar hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
1781371
Concept ID:
C5543306
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with spasticity, cataracts, and cerebellar hypoplasia (NEDSCAC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development. More severely affected individuals are nonverbal and do not achieve independent ambulation, whereas others develop some speech and can walk, or show regression later in childhood. Common features include axial hypotonia, peripheral spasticity, dystonia, cataracts, and seizures. Brain imaging usually shows cerebellar hypoplasia with variable additional abnormalities, such as thin corpus callosum, cerebral atrophy, and hypomyelination (summary by Meng et al., 2021).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy 98
MedGen UID:
1794227
Concept ID:
C5562017
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy-98 (DEE98) is characterized by onset of seizures in the first decade (range infancy to late childhood) associated with variable global developmental delay. Other features may include hypotonia, spasticity, and quadriparesis. Brain imaging may be normal or show nonspecific and variable abnormalities, including polymicrogyria. The severity is variable; some patients may die of refractory status epilepticus (summary by Vetro et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of DEE, see 308350.
Schaaf-Yang syndrome
MedGen UID:
1807366
Concept ID:
C5575066
Disease or Syndrome
Schaaf-Yang syndrome (SYS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder that shares multiple clinical features with the genetically related Prader-Willi syndrome. It usually manifests at birth with muscular hypotonia in all and distal joint contractures in a majority of affected individuals. Gastrointestinal/feeding problems are particularly pronounced in infancy and childhood, but can transition to hyperphagia and obesity in adulthood. Respiratory distress is present in many individuals at birth, with approximately half requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation, and approximately 20% requiring tracheostomy. Skeletal manifestations such as joint contractures, scoliosis, and decreased bone mineral density are frequently observed. All affected individuals show developmental delay, resulting in intellectual disability of variable degree, from low-normal intelligence to severe intellectual disability. Other findings may include short stature, seizures, eye anomalies, and hypogonadism.
Intellectual disability and myopathy syndrome
MedGen UID:
1808193
Concept ID:
C5676904
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual disability and myopathy syndrome (IDMYS) is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with mildly impaired intellectual development, hypotonia, muscle weakness and fatigue, and white matter abnormalities on brain imaging. Variable additional features may include sensorineural hearing loss, dysmorphic facies, and progressive heart disease (summary by Smeland et al., 2019).
Macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, lymphoid hyperplasia, and persistent fetal hemoglobin
MedGen UID:
1802903
Concept ID:
C5676928
Disease or Syndrome
Macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, lymphoid hyperplasia, and persistent fetal hemoglobin (MNDLFH) is characterized by clinically significant pharyngeal lymphoid hypertrophy, with adenoid overgrowth, frequent upper airway infections, and sleep apnea. Macrocephaly without structural brain abnormalities is present, and patients exhibit increased weight for height as well as delayed gross motor and impaired intellectual development; autistic features and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder have also been reported. An increased fraction of fetal hemoglobin has been observed in some patients (Ohishi et al., 2020; von der Lippe et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Joglar JA, Chung MK, Armbruster AL, Benjamin EJ, Chyou JY, Cronin EM, Deswal A, Eckhardt LL, Goldberger ZD, Gopinathannair R, Gorenek B, Hess PL, Hlatky M, Hogan G, Ibeh C, Indik JH, Kido K, Kusumoto F, Link MS, Linta KT, Marcus GM, McCarthy PM, Patel N, Patton KK, Perez MV, Piccini JP, Russo AM, Sanders P, Streur MM, Thomas KL, Times S, Tisdale JE, Valente AM, Van Wagoner DR; Peer Review Committee Members
Circulation 2024 Jan 2;149(1):e1-e156. Epub 2023 Nov 30 doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000001193. PMID: 38033089
Teede HJ, Tay CT, Laven JJE, Dokras A, Moran LJ, Piltonen TT, Costello MF, Boivin J, Redman LM, Boyle JA, Norman RJ, Mousa A, Joham AE
J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2023 Sep 18;108(10):2447-2469. doi: 10.1210/clinem/dgad463. PMID: 37580314Free PMC Article
Guzik A, Bushnell C
Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2017 Feb;23(1, Cerebrovascular Disease):15-39. doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000000416. PMID: 28157742

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Lee JJ, Sundar KM
Lung 2021 Apr;199(2):87-101. Epub 2021 Mar 13 doi: 10.1007/s00408-021-00426-w. PMID: 33713177
Randall DA
J Am Board Fam Med 2020 Nov-Dec;33(6):1025-1030. doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2020.06.200038. PMID: 33219085
Patel SR
Ann Intern Med 2019 Dec 3;171(11):ITC81-ITC96. doi: 10.7326/AITC201912030. PMID: 31791057
Bonsignore MR, Saaresranta T, Riha RL
Eur Respir Rev 2019 Dec 31;28(154) Epub 2019 Nov 6 doi: 10.1183/16000617.0030-2019. PMID: 31694839Free PMC Article
Rundo JV
Cleve Clin J Med 2019 Sep;86(9 Suppl 1):2-9. doi: 10.3949/ccjm.86.s1.02. PMID: 31509498

Diagnosis

Antonaglia C, Passuti G
Sleep Breath 2022 Jun;26(2):513-518. Epub 2021 Jul 29 doi: 10.1007/s11325-021-02412-1. PMID: 34324126Free PMC Article
Kirsch DB
Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2020 Aug;26(4):908-928. doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000000885. PMID: 32756228
Chang HP, Chen YF, Du JK
Kaohsiung J Med Sci 2020 Jan;36(1):7-12. Epub 2019 Sep 12 doi: 10.1002/kjm2.12130. PMID: 31512369
Veasey SC, Rosen IM
N Engl J Med 2019 Apr 11;380(15):1442-1449. doi: 10.1056/NEJMcp1816152. PMID: 30970189
Javaheri S, Barbe F, Campos-Rodriguez F, Dempsey JA, Khayat R, Javaheri S, Malhotra A, Martinez-Garcia MA, Mehra R, Pack AI, Polotsky VY, Redline S, Somers VK
J Am Coll Cardiol 2017 Feb 21;69(7):841-858. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.11.069. PMID: 28209226Free PMC Article

Therapy

Sweetman A, Lack L, McEvoy RD, Smith S, Eckert DJ, Osman A, Carberry JC, Wallace D, Nguyen PD, Catcheside P
Sleep Med Rev 2021 Dec;60:101519. Epub 2021 Jun 23 doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2021.101519. PMID: 34229295
Kuna ST, Reboussin DM, Strotmeyer ES, Millman RP, Zammit G, Walkup MP, Wadden TA, Wing RR, Pi-Sunyer FX, Spira AP, Foster GD; Sleep AHEAD Research Subgroup of the Look AHEAD Research Group
Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2021 Jan 15;203(2):221-229. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201912-2511OC. PMID: 32721163Free PMC Article
Ogilvie RP, Patel SR
Sleep Health 2017 Oct;3(5):383-388. Epub 2017 Aug 15 doi: 10.1016/j.sleh.2017.07.013. PMID: 28923198Free PMC Article
McEvoy RD, Antic NA, Heeley E, Luo Y, Ou Q, Zhang X, Mediano O, Chen R, Drager LF, Liu Z, Chen G, Du B, McArdle N, Mukherjee S, Tripathi M, Billot L, Li Q, Lorenzi-Filho G, Barbe F, Redline S, Wang J, Arima H, Neal B, White DP, Grunstein RR, Zhong N, Anderson CS; SAVE Investigators and Coordinators
N Engl J Med 2016 Sep 8;375(10):919-31. Epub 2016 Aug 28 doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1606599. PMID: 27571048
Garvey WT, Mechanick JI, Brett EM, Garber AJ, Hurley DL, Jastreboff AM, Nadolsky K, Pessah-Pollack R, Plodkowski R; Reviewers of the AACE/ACE Obesity Clinical Practice Guidelines
Endocr Pract 2016 Jul;22 Suppl 3:1-203. Epub 2016 May 24 doi: 10.4158/EP161365.GL. PMID: 27219496

Prognosis

Niranjan N, Sriram KB, Gopalan V
J Gastrointest Cancer 2023 Dec;54(4):1151-1157. Epub 2023 Feb 23 doi: 10.1007/s12029-023-00919-2. PMID: 36813984
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