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Compulsive behaviors

MedGen UID:
109373
Concept ID:
C0600104
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Synonym: Obsessive-compulsive behavior
SNOMED CT: Obsessive compulsive behavior (12479006); Compulsive behavior (12479006)
 
HPO: HP:0000722

Definition

Behavior that consists of repetitive acts, characterized by the feeling that one "has to" perform them, while being aware that these acts are not in line with one's overall goal. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Obsessive-compulsive disorder
MedGen UID:
14445
Concept ID:
C0028768
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by recurring obsessions and/or compulsions and has been estimated to affect nearly 5 million people in the United States (Karno et al., 1988). Evidence for a strong genetic component in OCD comes from twin studies, family genetics studies, and segregation analyses, as reviewed by Alsobrook et al. (2002). Zhang et al. (2002) suggested that hoarding is likely to be an evolutionarily conserved trait that, in times of adversity, was associated with increased survival and reproductive fitness. However, extreme forms of this trait are associated with marked disability and poor response to treatment (Black et al., 1998; Mataix-Cols et al., 1999).
Phenylketonuria
MedGen UID:
19244
Concept ID:
C0031485
Disease or Syndrome
Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency results in intolerance to the dietary intake of the essential amino acid phenylalanine and produces a spectrum of disorders. The risk of adverse outcome varies based on the degree of PAH deficiency. Without effective therapy, most individuals with severe PAH deficiency, known as classic PKU, develop profound and irreversible intellectual disability. Affected individuals on an unrestricted diet who have phenylalanine levels above normal but below 1,200 µmol/L (20 mg/dL) are at much lower risk for impaired cognitive development in the absence of treatment.
Tourette syndrome
MedGen UID:
21219
Concept ID:
C0040517
Disease or Syndrome
Tourette syndrome is a neurobehavioral disorder manifest particularly by motor and vocal tics and associated with behavioral abnormalities. Tics are sudden, brief, intermittent, involuntary or semi-voluntary movements (motor tics) or sounds (phonic or vocal tics). They typically consist of simple, coordinated, repetitive movements, gestures, or utterances that mimic fragments of normal behavior. Motor tics may range from simple blinking, nose twitching, and head jerking to more complex throwing, hitting, or making rude gestures. Phonic tics include sniffling, throat clearing, blowing, coughing, echolalia, or coprolalia. Males are affected about 3 times more often than females, and onset usually occurs between 3 and 8 years of age. By age 18 years, more than half of affected individuals are free of tics, but they may persist into adulthood (review by Jankovic, 2001).
Trichotillomania
MedGen UID:
21654
Concept ID:
C0040953
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Trichotillomania (TTM) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic, repetitive, or compulsive hair pulling resulting in noticeable hair loss. The activity causes distress to the individual and often interferes with functioning. Affected individuals may develop physical complications and often have overlapping psychologic disorders, such as Tourette syndrome (GTS; 137580) or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; 164230) (review by Novak et al., 2009).
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome
MedGen UID:
140765
Concept ID:
C0398568
Disease or Syndrome
McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome (designated as MLS throughout this review) is a multisystem disorder with central nervous system (CNS), neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and hematologic manifestations in males: CNS manifestations are a neurodegenerative basal ganglia disease including movement disorders, cognitive alterations, and psychiatric symptoms. Neuromuscular manifestations include a (mostly subclinical) sensorimotor axonopathy and muscle weakness or atrophy of different degrees. Cardiac manifestations include dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and tachyarrhythmia. Hematologically, MLS is defined as a specific blood group phenotype (named after the first proband, Hugh McLeod) that results from absent expression of the Kx erythrocyte antigen and weakened expression of Kell blood group antigens. The hematologic manifestations are red blood cell acanthocytosis and compensated hemolysis. Alloantibodies in the Kell and Kx blood group system can cause strong reactions to transfusions of incompatible blood and severe anemia in affected male newborns of Kell-negative mothers. Females heterozygous for XK pathogenic variants have mosaicism for the Kell and Kx blood group antigens. Although they usually lack CNS and neuromuscular manifestations, some heterozygous females may develop clinical manifestations including chorea or late-onset cognitive decline.
Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II
MedGen UID:
96022
Concept ID:
C0398739
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG2C) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe psychomotor retardation, mild dysmorphism, and impaired neutrophil motility. It is a member of a group of disorders with a defect in the processing of protein-bound glycans. For a general overview of congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs), see CDG1A (212065) and CDG2A (212066). Frydman (1996) contended that the neutrophil defect in CDG2C, which has been referred to as 'leukocyte adhesion deficiency type II' (LAD2), is a manifestation of the disorder and that there are no cases of 'primary' LAD II. Etzioni and Harlan (1999) provided a comprehensive review of both leukocyte adhesion deficiency-1 (LAD1; 116920) and LAD2. While the functional neutrophil studies are similar in the 2 LADs, the clinical course is milder in LAD2. Furthermore, patients with LAD2 present other abnormal features, such as growth and mental retardation, which are related to the primary defect in fucose metabolism. Delayed separation of the umbilical cord occurs in LAD1. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of LAD, see 116920.
FRAXE
MedGen UID:
155512
Concept ID:
C0751157
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder-109 (MRX109) is characterized by mildly to moderately impaired intellectual development associated with learning difficulties, communication deficits, attention problems, hyperactivity, and autistic behavior (summary by Bensaid et al., 2009). The disorder, which is associated with a fragile site on chromosome Xq28 (FRAXE), can be caused either by silencing of the FMR2 gene as a consequence of a CCG expansion located upstream of this gene or by deletion within the gene (Stettner et al., 2011).
Kleefstra syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
208639
Concept ID:
C0795833
Disease or Syndrome
Kleefstra syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability, autistic-like features, childhood hypotonia, and distinctive facial features. The majority of individuals function in the moderate-to-severe spectrum of intellectual disability although a few individuals have mild delay and total IQ within low-normal range. While most have severe expressive speech delay with little speech development, general language development is usually at a higher level, making nonverbal communication possible. A complex pattern of other findings can also be observed; these include heart defects, renal/urologic defects, genital defects in males, severe respiratory infections, epilepsy / febrile seizures, psychiatric disorders, and extreme apathy or catatonic-like features after puberty.
X-linked intellectual disability with marfanoid habitus
MedGen UID:
167096
Concept ID:
C0796022
Disease or Syndrome
MED12-related disorders include the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1), Lujan syndrome (LS), X-linked Ohdo syndrome (XLOS), Hardikar syndrome (HS), and nonspecific intellectual disability (NSID). FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, prominent nasal bridge, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. XLOS is characterized by intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and facial coarsening. HS has been described in females with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, biliary and liver anomalies, intestinal malrotation, pigmentary retinopathy, and coarctation of the aorta. Developmental and cognitive concerns have not been reported in females with HS. Pathogenic variants in MED12 have been reported in an increasing number of males and females with NSID, with affected individuals often having clinical features identified in other MED12-related disorders.
Intellectual disability, X-linked 49
MedGen UID:
923000
Concept ID:
C0796221
Disease or Syndrome
CLCN4-related neurodevelopmental disorder (CLCN4-NDD), an X-linked disorder, is characterized in the 36 males reported to date by developmental delay or intellectual disability, behavioral/mental health issues (e.g., autism spectrum disorder, anxiety, hyperactivity, and bipolar disorder), epilepsy, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. The five heterozygous females with a de novo CLCN4 variant reported to date had findings very similar to those of affected males. Twenty-two of 25 heterozygous females identified in family studies following identification of an affected male were unaffected or had only mild specific learning difficulties and/or mental health concerns, whereas three were more severely affected.
Myoclonic dystonia 11
MedGen UID:
331778
Concept ID:
C1834570
Disease or Syndrome
SGCE myoclonus-dystonia (SGCE-M-D) is a movement disorder characterized by a combination of rapid, brief muscle contractions (myoclonus) and/or sustained twisting and repetitive movements that result in abnormal postures (dystonia). The myoclonic jerks typical of SGCE-M-D most often affect the neck, trunk, and upper limbs with less common involvement of the legs. Approximately 50% of affected individuals have additional focal or segmental dystonia, presenting as cervical dystonia and/or writer's cramp. Non-motor features may include alcohol abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety disorders. Symptom onset is usually in the first decade of life and almost always by age 20 years, but ranges from age six months to 80 years. Most affected adults report a dramatic reduction in myoclonus in response to alcohol ingestion. SGCE-M-D is compatible with an active life of normal span.
Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, intellectual disability, and obesity syndrome
MedGen UID:
382718
Concept ID:
C2675904
Disease or Syndrome
For a detailed discussion of the WAGR syndrome, see 194072. In a subgroup of individuals with the WAGR syndrome, obesity develops. The phenotype in this subset is associated with haploinsufficiency for the BDNF gene.
Chromosome 5p13 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
416385
Concept ID:
C2750805
Disease or Syndrome
A rare partial autosomal trisomy/tetrasomy characterized by global developmental delay, intellectual disability, autistic behavior, muscular hypotonia, macrocephaly and facial dysmorphism (frontal bossing, short palpebral fissures, low set, dysplastic ears, short or shallow philtrum, high arched or narrow palate, micrognathia). Other associated clinical features include sleep disturbances, seizures, aplasia/hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, skeletal abnormalities (large hands and feet, long fingers and toes, talipes).
Chromosome 15q11.2 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
467404
Concept ID:
C3180937
Disease or Syndrome
A heterozygous deletion of chromosome 15q11.2 may increase the susceptibility to neuropsychiatric or neurodevelopmental problems, including delayed psychomotor development, speech delay, autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and possibly seizures (summary by Doornbos et al., 2009 and Burnside et al., 2011). See also chromosome 15q11.2 duplication syndrome (608636).
Developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, 13
MedGen UID:
482821
Concept ID:
C3281191
Disease or Syndrome
SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy is characterized by developmental delay, seizure onset in the first 18 months of life (mean 4 months), and intractable epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types (generalized tonic-clonic seizures, infantile spasms, and absence and focal seizures). Epilepsy syndromes can include Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, West syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathies (e.g., Dravet syndrome). Hypotonia and movement disorders including dystonia, ataxia, and choreoathetosis are common. Psychomotor development varies from normal prior to seizure onset (with subsequent slowing or regression after seizure onset) to abnormal from birth. Intellectual disability, present in all, ranges from mild to severe (in ~50% of affected individuals). Autistic features are noted in some. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) of unknown cause has been reported in approximately 10% of published cases. To date SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy has been reported in the literature in about 50 individuals.
Coffin-Siris syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
482831
Concept ID:
C3281201
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Microcephaly 9, primary, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
766800
Concept ID:
C3553886
Disease or Syndrome
Primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a clinical diagnosis made when an individual has a head circumference more than 3 standard deviations below the age- and sex-matched population mean and mental retardation, with no other associated malformations and with no apparent etiology. Most cases of primary microcephaly show an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (Woods et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary microcephaly, see MCPH1 (251200).
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 2
MedGen UID:
767519
Concept ID:
C3554605
Disease or Syndrome
Mitochondrial complex III deficiency nuclear type 2 is an autosomal recessive severe neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in childhood, but may show later onset, even in adulthood. Affected individuals have motor disability, with ataxia, apraxia, dystonia, and dysarthria, associated with necrotic lesions throughout the brain. Most patients also have cognitive impairment and axonal neuropathy and become severely disabled later in life (summary by Ghezzi et al., 2011). The disorder may present clinically as spinocerebellar ataxia or Leigh syndrome, or with psychiatric disturbances (Morino et al., 2014; Atwal, 2014; Nogueira et al., 2013). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of mitochondrial complex III deficiency, see MC3DN1 (124000).
Intellectual disability, X-linked 99
MedGen UID:
813076
Concept ID:
C3806746
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Any non-syndromic X-linked intellectual disability in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the USP9X gene.
Bosch-Boonstra-Schaaf optic atrophy syndrome
MedGen UID:
816693
Concept ID:
C3810363
Disease or Syndrome
Bosch-Boonstra-Schaaf optic atrophy syndrome (BBSOAS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed development, moderately impaired intellectual development, and optic atrophy. Most patients also have evidence of cerebral visual impairment. Dysmorphic facial features are variable and nonspecific (summary by Bosch et al., 2014).
Intellectual disability-facial dysmorphism syndrome due to SETD5 haploinsufficiency
MedGen UID:
816736
Concept ID:
C3810406
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability-facial dysmorphism syndrome due to SETD5 haploinsufficiency is a rare, syndromic intellectual disability characterized by intellectual disability of various severity, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, dysmorphic features, autism and behavioral issues. Growth retardation, congenital heart anomalies, gastrointestinal and genitourinary defects have been rarely associated.
Intellectual disability-severe speech delay-mild dysmorphism syndrome
MedGen UID:
862201
Concept ID:
C4013764
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual developmental disorder with language impairment and with or without autistic features is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with moderate to severe speech delay that particularly affects expressive speech. Most patients have articulation defects, but frank verbal dyspraxia is not observed. Common dysmorphic features include broad forehead, downslanting palpebral fissures, short nose with broad tip, relative macrocephaly, frontal hair upsweep, and prominent digit pads. Gross motor skills are also delayed. Some patients have autistic features and/or behavioral problems. All reported cases have occurred de novo (review by Le Fevre et al., 2013).
ADNP-related multiple congenital anomalies - intellectual disability - autism spectrum disorder
MedGen UID:
862975
Concept ID:
C4014538
Disease or Syndrome
ADNP-related disorder is characterized by hypotonia, severe speech and motor delay, mild-to-severe intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features (prominent forehead, high anterior hairline, wide and depressed nasal bridge, and short nose with full, upturned nasal tip) based on a cohort of 78 individuals. Features of autism spectrum disorder are common (stereotypic behavior, impaired social interaction). Other common findings include additional behavioral problems, sleep disturbance, brain abnormalities, seizures, feeding issues, gastrointestinal problems, visual dysfunction (hypermetropia, strabismus, cortical visual impairment), musculoskeletal anomalies, endocrine issues including short stature and hormonal deficiencies, cardiac and urinary tract anomalies, and hearing loss.
Micrognathia-recurrent infections-behavioral abnormalities-mild intellectual disability syndrome
MedGen UID:
934707
Concept ID:
C4310740
Disease or Syndrome
TRIO-related intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by delay in acquisition of motor and language skills, mild to borderline intellectual disability, and neurobehavioral problems (including autistic traits or autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and/or aggression). Neonatal or infantile feeding difficulties including poor suck, impaired bottle feeding, and failure to thrive are common and are often the presenting finding. Other findings can include microcephaly, variable hand and dental abnormalities, and suggestive facial features. Only ten of the 20 individuals with a TRIO pathogenic variant reported to date had sufficient information to make preliminary generalizations about clinical manifestations; it is anticipated that the phenotype of this newly described disorder will continue to evolve.
Intellectual disability, X-linked, syndromic, Bain type
MedGen UID:
934781
Concept ID:
C4310814
Disease or Syndrome
Most individuals with HNRNPH2-related neurodevelopmental disorder (HNRNPH2-NDD) have symptoms early in life, before age 12 months. The major features of HNRNPH2-NDD are developmental delay / intellectual disability, motor and language delays, behavioral and psychiatric disorders, and growth and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Minor features include dysmorphic facies, gastrointestinal disturbances, epilepsy, and visual defects. Although HNRNPH2-NDD is an X-linked condition, there is not enough information on affected females versus affected males to make any generalizations about phenotypic differences between the two sexes.
Intellectual developmental disorder with gastrointestinal difficulties and high pain threshold
MedGen UID:
1385744
Concept ID:
C4479517
Disease or Syndrome
Jansen-de Vries syndrome (JDVS) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, intellectual disability with speech delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Most patients have variable additional features, including feeding and gastrointestinal difficulties, high pain threshold and/or hypersensitivity to sound, and dysmorphic features, including mild facial abnormalities, strabismus, and small hands and feet (summary by Jansen et al., 2017).
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation 6
MedGen UID:
1387791
Concept ID:
C4517377
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation refers to a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motor and cognitive dysfunction beginning in childhood or young adulthood. Patients show extrapyramidal motor signs, such as spasticity, dystonia, and parkinsonism. Brain imaging shows iron accumulation in the basal ganglia (summary by Dusi et al., 2014). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of NBIA, see NBIA1 (234200).
Coffin-Siris syndrome 7
MedGen UID:
1648281
Concept ID:
C4747954
Disease or Syndrome
Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is classically characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the distal phalanx or nail of the fifth and additional digits, developmental or cognitive delay of varying degree, distinctive facial features, hypotonia, hirsutism/hypertrichosis, and sparse scalp hair. Congenital anomalies can include malformations of the cardiac, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and/or central nervous systems. Other findings commonly include feeding difficulties, slow growth, ophthalmologic abnormalities, and hearing impairment.
Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 57
MedGen UID:
1648280
Concept ID:
C4748003
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
MRD57 is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder with a highly variable phenotype. Most affected individuals have delayed psychomotor development apparent in infancy or early childhood, language delay, and behavioral abnormalities. Additional features may include hypotonia, feeding problems, gastrointestinal issues, and dysmorphic facial features (summary by Reijnders et al., 2018).
Developmental delay with variable intellectual impairment and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1676192
Concept ID:
C5193092
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with variable intellectual impairment and behavioral abnormalities (DDVIBA) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder. Most patients have impaired intellectual development with speech difficulties, and many have behavioral abnormalities, most commonly autism spectrum disorder (ASD), defects in attention, and/or hyperactivity. Many patients have dysmorphic features, although there is not a consistent gestalt. Additional more variable features may include hypotonia, somatic overgrowth with macrocephaly, mild distal skeletal anomalies, sleep disturbances, movement disorders, and gastrointestinal issues, such as constipation. The phenotype is highly variable (summary by Vetrini et al., 2019 and Torti et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without variable brain abnormalities; NEDBA
MedGen UID:
1675664
Concept ID:
C5193102
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with or without variable brain abnormalities (NEDBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy or early childhood, resulting in mildly delayed walking, variably impaired intellectual development, and poor or absent speech. Additional features may include hypotonia, spasticity, or ataxia. About half of patients have abnormal findings on brain imaging, including cerebral or cerebellar atrophy, loss of white matter volume, thin corpus callosum, and perisylvian polymicrogyria. Seizures are not a prominent finding, and although some patients may have nonspecific dysmorphic facial features, there is no common or consistent gestalt (summary by Platzer et al., 2019).
Developmental delay with or without dysmorphic facies and autism
MedGen UID:
1679263
Concept ID:
C5193106
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with or without dysmorphic facies and autism (DEDDFA) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder apparent from infancy or early childhood and associated with variably impaired intellectual development. Some patients may be severely affected with no speech and inability to walk, whereas others may be able to attend special schools or have normal intellectual function associated with autism spectrum disorder and mild speech delay. Genetic analysis has suggested that the phenotype can be broadly categorized into 2 main groups. Patients with TRRAP mutations affecting residues 1031-1159 have a more severe disorder, often with multisystem involvement, including renal, cardiac, and genitourinary systems, as well as structural brain abnormalities. Patients with mutations outside of that region tend to have a less severe phenotype with a higher incidence of autism and usually no systemic involvement. Patients in both groups usually have somewhat similar dysmorphic facial features, such as upslanting palpebral fissures, hypertelorism, low-set ears, and broad or depressed nasal bridge, although these features are highly variable (summary by Cogne et al., 2019).
Autism, susceptibility to, 20
MedGen UID:
1717195
Concept ID:
C5394226
Finding
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome
MedGen UID:
1718781
Concept ID:
C5394425
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly, developmental delay, and brittle hair syndrome (MDBH) is a multisystem disorder with clinical variability. Affected individuals show cognitive and motor disabilities, as well as some degree of fine, brittle hair with microscopic shaft abnormalities. Other shared features include failure to thrive in early childhood and short stature, with some patients exhibiting feeding difficulties and hepatic steatosis (Kuo et al., 2019).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with language impairment and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1708389
Concept ID:
C5394502
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with speech impairment and behavioral abnormalities (NEDLIB) is characterized by impaired intellectual development or developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities including autistic features, and language impairment. Other features include seizures and developmental regression (Salpietro et al., 2019).
Periventricular nodular heterotopia 9
MedGen UID:
1718470
Concept ID:
C5394503
Disease or Syndrome
Periventricular nodular heterotopia-9 (PVNH9) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized as a malformation of cortical development. Anterior predominant PVNH, thin corpus callosum, and decreased white matter volume are found on brain imaging, but the clinical effects are variable. Most patients have impaired intellectual development and cognitive defects associated with low IQ (range 50 to 80), learning disabilities, and behavior abnormalities. Some patients develop seizures that tend to have a focal origin. However, some mutation carriers may be less severely affected with borderline or even normal IQ, suggesting incomplete penetrance of the phenotype (summary by Heinzen et al., 2018, Walters et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of periventricular nodular heterotopia, see 300049.
Dystonia 30
MedGen UID:
1785079
Concept ID:
C5543312
Disease or Syndrome
Dystonia-30 (DYT30) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized by the onset of symptoms in the first decades of life. Patients present with oromandibular, cervical, bulbar, or upper limb dystonia, and usually show slow progression to generalized dystonia. Some patients may lose ambulation. A subset of patients may also have neurocognitive impairment, including mild intellectual disability or psychiatric manifestations (summary by Steel et al., 2020). In a review of the pathogenesis of disorders with prominent dystonia, Monfrini et al. (2021) classified DYT30 as belonging to a group of neurologic disorders termed 'HOPS-associated neurologic disorders' (HOPSANDs), which are caused by mutations in genes encoding various components of the autophagic/endolysosomal system, including VPS16.
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 65
MedGen UID:
1787923
Concept ID:
C5543371
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-65 (MRD65) is characterized by delayed motor and speech acquisition, variably impaired intellectual development, and behavioral abnormalities. Affected individuals also have dysmorphic facial features. Brain imaging may be normal or may show abnormalities, including cerebellar hypoplasia, poor development of the corpus callosum, dysmorphic hippocampus, and polymicrogyria. Feeding difficulties, hypotonia, and seizures may also be observed (Duncan et al., 2020).
Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 30
MedGen UID:
1778853
Concept ID:
C5543620
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia-30 (SCAR30) is a progressive neurologic disorder characterized by childhood-onset global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development, motor dysfunction, and cerebellar ataxia. Affected individuals may also have psychiatric abnormalities, such as obsessive behavior, psychotic episodes, or hallucinations. Brain imaging usually shows cerebellar atrophy, although this may be an age-dependent feature (summary by Langer et al., 2018).
Usmani-Riazuddin syndrome, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
1794162
Concept ID:
C5561952
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant Usmani-Riazzudin syndrome (USRISD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development and speech delay, hypotonia, and behavioral abnormalities, most commonly aggressive behavior. More variable additional features may include seizures and distal limb anomalies (summary by Usmani et al., 2021).
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794167
Concept ID:
C5561957
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay, impaired speech, and behavioral abnormalities (DDISBA) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from early childhood. Intellectual disability can range from mild to severe. Additional variable features may include dysmorphic facial features, seizures, hypotonia, motor abnormalities such as Tourette syndrome or dystonia, and hearing loss (summary by Cousin et al., 2021).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and brain abnormalities
MedGen UID:
1794187
Concept ID:
C5561977
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia and brain abnormalities (NEDHYBA) is characterized by impaired development of motor skills, cognitive function, and speech acquisition beginning in infancy or early childhood. Some affected individuals may have feeding difficulties, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, and nonspecific dysmorphic facial features. Brain imaging shows variable abnormalities, including corpus callosum defects, cerebellar defects, and decreased white matter volume. There is significant phenotypic variability (summary by Duncan et al., 2021).
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hyperkinetic movements and dyskinesia
MedGen UID:
1794248
Concept ID:
C5562038
Disease or Syndrome
Neurodevelopmental disorder with hyperkinetic movements and dyskinesia (NEDHYD) is an autosomal recessive complex neurologic disorder characterized by severe global developmental delay with axial hypotonia, impaired intellectual development, poor overall growth, and abnormal involuntary hyperkinetic movements, including dystonia, myoclonus, spasticity, and orofacial dyskinesia. It is the most severe manifestation of ADCY5-related dyskinetic disorders (summary by Okamoto et al., 2021 and Kaiyrzhanov et al., 2021).
Parenti-mignot neurodevelopmental syndrome
MedGen UID:
1808333
Concept ID:
C5676984
Disease or Syndrome
Parenti-Mignot neurodevelopmental syndrome (PMNDS) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder frequently characterized by impaired intellectual development, speech delay, motor delay, behavioral problems, and epilepsy (Parenti et al., 2021).
Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 67
MedGen UID:
1805690
Concept ID:
C5677006
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-67 (MRD67) is characterized by global developmental delay with variably impaired intellectual development apparent from infancy or early childhood. Additional features may include behavioral abnormalities, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ADHD, as well as language and sleeping difficulties. Brain imaging is normal (Ismail et al., 2022).
Transketolase deficiency
MedGen UID:
1814561
Concept ID:
C5700245
Disease or Syndrome
A rare disorder of pentose phosphate metabolism with characteristics of developmental delay and intellectual disability, delayed or absent speech, short stature and congenital heart defects (such as ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale). Additional reported features include hypotonia, hyperactivity, stereotypic behaviour, ophthalmologic abnormalities (bilateral cataract, uveitis, strabismus), hearing impairment and variable facial dysmorphism among others. Laboratory analysis shows elevated plasma and urinary polyols (erythritol, arabitol and ribitol) and urinary sugar-phosphates (ribose-5-phosphate and xylulose/ribulose-5-phosphate).
Intellectual developmental disorder with autism and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1823979
Concept ID:
C5774206
Disease or Syndrome
Intellectual developmental disorder with autism and dysmorphic facies (IDDADF) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by moderate to severely impaired cognitive development associated with behavioral abnormalities, including autism spectrum disorder. Affected individuals have variable dysmorphic facial features (Al-Amri et al., 2022)
Developmental delay with variable intellectual disability and dysmorphic facies
MedGen UID:
1824015
Concept ID:
C5774242
Disease or Syndrome
Developmental delay with variable intellectual disability and dysmorphic facies (DIDDF) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by neurologic deficits and characteristic dysmorphic facial features apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals usually show impaired intellectual development, speech delay, learning difficulties, and/or behavioral problems. Additional features may include hypotonia, hand or foot deformities, and palatal defects (Verberne et al., 2021; Verberne et al., 2022).
Intellectual developmental disorder, X-linked 111
MedGen UID:
1840204
Concept ID:
C5829568
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
X-linked intellectual developmental disorder-111 (XLID111) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by different degrees of impaired intellectual development associated with motor, speech, and behavioral impairments (El Chehadeh et al., 2022).

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Lee DK, Lipner SR
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 May 24;19(11) doi: 10.3390/ijerph19116370. PMID: 35681955Free PMC Article
Castinetti F, Albarel F, Amodru V, Cuny T, Dufour H, Graillon T, Morange I, Brue T
Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2021 Feb;82(1):15-19. Epub 2020 Dec 26 doi: 10.1016/j.ando.2020.12.008. PMID: 33373604
Politi C, Ciccacci C, Novelli G, Borgiani P
Neuromolecular Med 2018 Mar;20(1):1-17. Epub 2018 Jan 5 doi: 10.1007/s12017-017-8473-7. PMID: 29305687

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Grant JE, Chesivoir E, Valle S, Ehsan D, Chamberlain SR
Am J Psychiatry 2023 May 1;180(5):348-356. Epub 2023 Feb 22 doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.20220737. PMID: 36856701
Lee DK, Lipner SR
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 May 24;19(11) doi: 10.3390/ijerph19116370. PMID: 35681955Free PMC Article
Goslar M, Leibetseder M, Muench HM, Hofmann SG, Laireiter AR
J Behav Addict 2020 Apr 1;9(1):14-43. doi: 10.1556/2006.2020.00005. PMID: 32359229Free PMC Article
Erga AH, Alves G, Tysnes OB, Pedersen KF
J Neurol 2020 Jan;267(1):259-266. Epub 2019 Oct 18 doi: 10.1007/s00415-019-09584-7. PMID: 31628533Free PMC Article
Grant JE, Chamberlain SR, Redden SA, Leppink EW, Odlaug BL, Kim SW
JAMA Psychiatry 2016 May 1;73(5):490-6. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0060. PMID: 27007062

Diagnosis

Bellanti JA
Allergy Asthma Proc 2023 Sep 1;44(5):296-305. doi: 10.2500/aap.2023.44.230029. PMID: 37641225
Grant JE, Chesivoir E, Valle S, Ehsan D, Chamberlain SR
Am J Psychiatry 2023 May 1;180(5):348-356. Epub 2023 Feb 22 doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.20220737. PMID: 36856701
Cardoso F
Int Rev Neurobiol 2017;134:1397-1408. Epub 2017 Jun 1 doi: 10.1016/bs.irn.2017.05.004. PMID: 28805577
Grant JE, Chamberlain SR, Redden SA, Leppink EW, Odlaug BL, Kim SW
JAMA Psychiatry 2016 May 1;73(5):490-6. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0060. PMID: 27007062
Volkow ND, Fowler JS, Wang GJ, Baler R, Telang F
Neuropharmacology 2009;56 Suppl 1(Suppl 1):3-8. Epub 2008 Jun 3 doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2008.05.022. PMID: 18617195Free PMC Article

Therapy

Grant JE, Chesivoir E, Valle S, Ehsan D, Chamberlain SR
Am J Psychiatry 2023 May 1;180(5):348-356. Epub 2023 Feb 22 doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.20220737. PMID: 36856701
Lee DK, Lipner SR
Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 May 24;19(11) doi: 10.3390/ijerph19116370. PMID: 35681955Free PMC Article
Castinetti F, Albarel F, Amodru V, Cuny T, Dufour H, Graillon T, Morange I, Brue T
Ann Endocrinol (Paris) 2021 Feb;82(1):15-19. Epub 2020 Dec 26 doi: 10.1016/j.ando.2020.12.008. PMID: 33373604
Grant JE, Chamberlain SR, Redden SA, Leppink EW, Odlaug BL, Kim SW
JAMA Psychiatry 2016 May 1;73(5):490-6. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0060. PMID: 27007062
Evans AH, Strafella AP, Weintraub D, Stacy M
Mov Disord 2009 Aug 15;24(11):1561-70. doi: 10.1002/mds.22505. PMID: 19526584

Prognosis

Cavanna AE, Purpura G, Riva A, Nacinovich R, Seri S
J Neurol Sci 2023 Aug 15;451:120725. Epub 2023 Jun 29 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2023.120725. PMID: 37421881
Grassi G, Albani G, Terenzi F, Razzolini L, Ramat S
Neurol Sci 2021 Jul;42(7):2673-2682. Epub 2021 Apr 14 doi: 10.1007/s10072-021-05237-8. PMID: 33852081
Erga AH, Alves G, Tysnes OB, Pedersen KF
J Neurol 2020 Jan;267(1):259-266. Epub 2019 Oct 18 doi: 10.1007/s00415-019-09584-7. PMID: 31628533Free PMC Article
Oosterloo M, Craufurd D, Nijsten H, van Duijn E
J Huntingtons Dis 2019;8(1):1-7. doi: 10.3233/JHD-180335. PMID: 30714966Free PMC Article
Yang XW, Lu XH
Curr Opin Neurol 2011 Apr;24(2):114-8. doi: 10.1097/WCO.0b013e32834451fb. PMID: 21386675

Clinical prediction guides

Cavanna AE, Purpura G, Riva A, Nacinovich R, Seri S
J Neurol Sci 2023 Aug 15;451:120725. Epub 2023 Jun 29 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2023.120725. PMID: 37421881
Grant JE, Chesivoir E, Valle S, Ehsan D, Chamberlain SR
Am J Psychiatry 2023 May 1;180(5):348-356. Epub 2023 Feb 22 doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.20220737. PMID: 36856701
Lin CR, Amokrane N, Chen S, Chen TX, Lai RY, Trinh P, Minyetty MJ, Emmerich H, Pan MK, Claassen DO, Kuo SH
Ann Clin Transl Neurol 2023 Jan;10(1):48-57. Epub 2022 Nov 19 doi: 10.1002/acn3.51698. PMID: 36401598Free PMC Article
Brauer L, Storch EA, Lewin AB, Grant JE
Ann Clin Psychiatry 2021 May;33(2):e2-e7. doi: 10.12788/acp.0030. PMID: 33878289
Grant JE, Chamberlain SR, Redden SA, Leppink EW, Odlaug BL, Kim SW
JAMA Psychiatry 2016 May 1;73(5):490-6. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.0060. PMID: 27007062

Recent systematic reviews

Akbari M, Jamshidi S, Sheikhi S, Alijani F, Kafshchi P, Taylor D
Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2024 Feb;241(2):209-223. Epub 2024 Jan 16 doi: 10.1007/s00213-024-06529-5. PMID: 38227009
Valenciano-Mendoza E, Mora-Maltas B, Mestre-Bach G, Munguía L, Richard J, Derevensky JL, Potenza MN, Jiménez-Murcia S
J Gambl Stud 2023 Jun;39(2):579-624. Epub 2023 Apr 1 doi: 10.1007/s10899-023-10196-0. PMID: 37004597Free PMC Article
Pruneti C, Coscioni G, Guidotti S
Nutrients 2023 Feb 2;15(3) doi: 10.3390/nu15030755. PMID: 36771463Free PMC Article
Lee RSC, Hoppenbrouwers S, Franken I
Neuropsychol Rev 2019 Mar;29(1):14-26. Epub 2019 Mar 30 doi: 10.1007/s11065-019-09402-x. PMID: 30927147
Thorsen AL, Hagland P, Radua J, Mataix-Cols D, Kvale G, Hansen B, van den Heuvel OA
Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging 2018 Jun;3(6):563-571. Epub 2018 Feb 3 doi: 10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.01.009. PMID: 29550459Free PMC Article

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    Clinical resources

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