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LEOPARD syndrome 1(LPRD1)

MedGen UID:
1631694
Concept ID:
C4551484
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: LENTIGINOSIS, CARDIOMYOPATHIC; LPRD1; MULTIPLE LENTIGINES SYNDROME; PTPN11-Related LEOPARD Syndrome
 
Gene (location): PTPN11 (12q24.13)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0100082
OMIM®: 151100

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Noonan Syndrome with Multiple Lentigines
Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) is a condition in which the cardinal features consist of lentigines, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, short stature, pectus deformity, and dysmorphic facial features including widely spaced eyes and ptosis. Multiple lentigines present as dispersed flat, black-brown macules, mostly on the face, neck, and upper part of the trunk with sparing of the mucosa. In general, lentigines do not appear until age four to five years but then increase to the thousands by puberty. Some individuals with NSML do not exhibit lentigines. Approximately 85% of affected individuals have heart defects, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (typically appearing during infancy and sometimes progressive) and pulmonary valve stenosis. Postnatal growth restriction resulting in short stature occurs in fewer than 50% of affected persons, although most affected individuals have a height that is less than the 25th centile for age. Sensorineural hearing deficits, present in approximately 20% of affected individuals, are poorly characterized. Intellectual disability, typically mild, is observed in approximately 30% of persons with NSML. [from GeneReviews]
Authors:
Bruce D Gelb  |  Marco Tartaglia   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
LEOPARD is an acronym for the manifestations of this syndrome as listed by Gorlin et al. (1969): multiple lentigines, electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, ocular hypertelorism, pulmonic stenosis, abnormal genitalia, retardation of growth, and sensorineural deafness. Genetic Heterogeneity of LEOPARD Syndrome LEOPARD syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. See also LEOPARD syndrome-2 (LPRD2; 611554), caused by mutation in the RAF1 gene (164760), and LEOPARD syndrome-3 (LPRD3; 613707), caused by mutation in the BRAF gene (164757).  http://www.omim.org/entry/151100
From MedlinePlus Genetics
Other signs and symptoms of Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines include hearing loss caused by abnormalities in the inner ear (sensorineural deafness), mild intellectual disability, and extra folds of skin on the back of the neck. Affected males often have genital abnormalities, which can include undescended testes (cryptorchidism) and a urethra that opens on the underside of the penis (hypospadias). These abnormalities may reduce the ability to have biological children (decreased fertility). Females with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines may have poorly developed ovaries and delayed puberty.

Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines is one of a group of related conditions collectively known as RASopathies. These conditions all have similar signs and symptoms and are caused by changes in the same cell signaling pathway. In addition to Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, the RASopathies include Noonan syndrome, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, Costello syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, and Legius syndrome.

At birth, people with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines are typically of normal weight and height, but in some, growth slows over time. This slow growth results in affected individuals being shorter than average, although less than half of people with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines have significantly short stature.

Of the people with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines who have heart defects, about 80 percent have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which is a thickening of the heart muscle that forces the heart to work harder to pump blood. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy most often affects the lower left chamber of the heart (the left ventricle). Up to 20 percent of people with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines who have heart problems have a narrowing of the artery from the heart to the lungs (pulmonary stenosis).

People with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines can have a distinctive facial appearance. In addition to ocular hypertelorism, affected individuals may have droopy eyelids (ptosis), thick lips, and low-set ears. Affected individuals also usually have an abnormal appearance of the chest; they either have pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum.

The lentigines seen in Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines typically first appear in mid-childhood, mostly on the face, neck, and upper body. Affected individuals may have thousands of small dark brown skin spots by the time they reach puberty. Unlike freckles, the appearance of lentigines has nothing to do with sun exposure. In addition to lentigines, people with this condition may have lighter brown skin spots called café-au-lait spots. Café-au-lait spots tend to develop before the lentigines, appearing within the first year of life in most affected people.

Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (formerly called LEOPARD syndrome) is a condition that affects many areas of the body. As the condition name suggests, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines is very similar to a condition called Noonan syndrome, and it can be difficult to tell the two disorders apart in early childhood. However, the features of these two conditions differ later in life. The characteristic features of Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines include brown skin spots called lentigines that are similar to freckles, heart defects, widely spaced eyes (ocular hypertelorism), a sunken chest (pectus excavatum) or protruding chest (pectus carinatum), and short stature. These features vary, however, even among affected individuals in the same family. Not all individuals with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines have all the characteristic features of this condition.  https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines

Clinical features

From HPO
Cryptorchidism
MedGen UID:
8192
Concept ID:
C0010417
Congenital Abnormality
Cryptorchidism, or failure of testicular descent, is a common human congenital abnormality with a multifactorial etiology that likely reflects the involvement of endocrine, environmental, and hereditary factors. Cryptorchidism can result in infertility and increases risk for testicular tumors. Testicular descent from abdomen to scrotum occurs in 2 distinct phases: the transabdominal phase and the inguinoscrotal phase (summary by Gorlov et al., 2002).
Unilateral renal agenesis
MedGen UID:
75607
Concept ID:
C0266294
Congenital Abnormality
A unilateral form of agenesis of the kidney.
Aplasia of the ovary
MedGen UID:
452348
Concept ID:
C0266368
Congenital Abnormality
Aplasia, that is failure to develop, of the ovary.
Hypoplasia of the ovary
MedGen UID:
672766
Concept ID:
C0685840
Congenital Abnormality
Developmental hypoplasia of the ovary.
Hypospadias
MedGen UID:
163083
Concept ID:
C0848558
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormal position of urethral meatus on the ventral penile shaft (underside) characterized by displacement of the urethral meatus from the tip of the glans penis to the ventral surface of the penis, scrotum, or perineum.
Micropenis
MedGen UID:
1633603
Concept ID:
C4551492
Congenital Abnormality
Abnormally small penis. At birth, the normal penis is about 3 cm (stretched length from pubic tubercle to tip of penis) with micropenis less than 2.0-2.5 cm.
Cubitus valgus
MedGen UID:
490152
Concept ID:
C0158465
Acquired Abnormality
Abnormal positioning in which the elbows are turned out.
Scapular winging
MedGen UID:
66822
Concept ID:
C0240953
Anatomical Abnormality
Abnormal protrusion of the scapula away from the surface of the back.
Limited elbow movement
MedGen UID:
337930
Concept ID:
C1849955
Finding
Bundle branch block
MedGen UID:
2752
Concept ID:
C0006384
Finding
Block of conduction of electrical impulses along the Bundle of His or along one of its bundle branches.
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
MedGen UID:
2881
Concept ID:
C0007194
Disease or Syndrome
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of increased ventricular wall thickness or mass in the absence of loading conditions (hypertension, valve disease) sufficient to cause the observed abnormality.
Mitral valve prolapse
MedGen UID:
7671
Concept ID:
C0026267
Disease or Syndrome
One or both of the leaflets (cusps) of the mitral valve bulges back into the left atrium upon contraction of the left ventricle.
Third degree atrioventricular block
MedGen UID:
56230
Concept ID:
C0151517
Disease or Syndrome
Third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block (also referred to as complete heart block) is the complete dissociation of the atria and the ventricles. Third-degree AV block exists when more P waves than QRS complexes exist and no relationship (no conduction) exists between them.
Complete atrioventricular canal
MedGen UID:
65132
Concept ID:
C0221215
Congenital Abnormality
A congenital heart defect characterized by a specific combination of heart defects with a common atrioventricular valve, primum atrial septal defect and inlet ventricular septal defect.
Subvalvular aortic stenosis
MedGen UID:
90950
Concept ID:
C0340375
Disease or Syndrome
A fixed form of obstruction to blood flow across the left-ventricular outflow tract related to stenosis (narrowing) below the level of the aortic valve.
Pulmonic stenosis
MedGen UID:
408291
Concept ID:
C1956257
Disease or Syndrome
A narrowing of the right ventricular outflow tract that can occur at the pulmonary valve (valvular stenosis), below the pulmonary valve (infundibular stenosis), or above the pulmonary valve (supravalvar stenosis).
Short stature
MedGen UID:
87607
Concept ID:
C0349588
Finding
A height below that which is expected according to age and gender norms. Although there is no universally accepted definition of short stature, many refer to "short stature" as height more than 2 standard deviations below the mean for age and gender (or below the 3rd percentile for age and gender dependent norms).
Sensorineural hearing impairment
MedGen UID:
9164
Concept ID:
C0018784
Disease or Syndrome
A type of hearing impairment in one or both ears related to an abnormal functionality of the cochlear nerve.
Low-set ears
MedGen UID:
65980
Concept ID:
C0239234
Congenital Abnormality
Upper insertion of the ear to the scalp below an imaginary horizontal line drawn between the inner canthi of the eye and extending posteriorly to the ear.
Posteriorly rotated ears
MedGen UID:
96566
Concept ID:
C0431478
Congenital Abnormality
A type of abnormal location of the ears in which the position of the ears is characterized by posterior rotation (the superior part of the ears is rotated towards the back of the head, and the inferior part of the ears towards the front).
Protruding ear
MedGen UID:
343309
Concept ID:
C1855285
Finding
Angle formed by the plane of the ear and the mastoid bone greater than the 97th centile for age (objective); or, outer edge of the helix more than 2 cm from the mastoid at the point of maximum distance (objective).
Intellectual disability, mild
MedGen UID:
10044
Concept ID:
C0026106
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Mild intellectual disability is defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) in the range of 50-69.
Spina bifida occulta
MedGen UID:
36380
Concept ID:
C0080174
Congenital Abnormality
The closed form of spina bifida with incomplete closure of a vertebral body with intact overlying skin.
Hyposmia
MedGen UID:
473584
Concept ID:
C2364082
Finding
A decreased sensitivity to odorants (that is, a decreased ability to perceive odors).
Pectus carinatum
MedGen UID:
57643
Concept ID:
C0158731
Finding
A deformity of the chest caused by overgrowth of the ribs and characterized by protrusion of the sternum.
Missing ribs
MedGen UID:
98093
Concept ID:
C0426816
Finding
A developmental anomaly with absence of one or more ribs.
Kyphoscoliosis
MedGen UID:
154361
Concept ID:
C0575158
Anatomical Abnormality
An abnormal curvature of the spine in both a coronal (lateral) and sagittal (back-to-front) plane.
Parietal bossing
MedGen UID:
347377
Concept ID:
C1857126
Finding
Parietal bossing is a marked prominence in the parietal region.
Pectus excavatum
MedGen UID:
781174
Concept ID:
C2051831
Finding
A defect of the chest wall characterized by a depression of the sternum, giving the chest ("pectus") a caved-in ("excavatum") appearance.
Macrocephaly
MedGen UID:
745757
Concept ID:
C2243051
Finding
Occipitofrontal (head) circumference greater than 97th centile compared to appropriate, age matched, sex-matched normal standards. Alternatively, a apparently increased size of the cranium.
Webbed neck
MedGen UID:
113154
Concept ID:
C0221217
Congenital Abnormality
Pterygium colli is a congenital skin fold that runs along the sides of the neck down to the shoulders. It involves an ectopic fibrotic facial band superficial to the trapezius muscle. Excess hair-bearing skin is also present and extends down the cervical region well beyond the normal hairline.
Mandibular prognathia
MedGen UID:
98316
Concept ID:
C0399526
Finding
Abnormal prominence of the chin related to increased length of the mandible.
Short neck
MedGen UID:
99267
Concept ID:
C0521525
Finding
Diminished length of the neck.
Epicanthus
MedGen UID:
151862
Concept ID:
C0678230
Congenital Abnormality
Epicanthus is a condition in which a fold of skin stretches from the upper to the lower eyelid, partially covering the inner canthus. Usher (1935) noted that epicanthus is a normal finding in the fetus of all races. Epicanthus also occurs in association with hereditary ptosis (110100).
Triangular face
MedGen UID:
324383
Concept ID:
C1835884
Finding
Facial contour, as viewed from the front, triangular in shape, with breadth at the temples and tapering to a narrow chin.
Depressed nasal ridge
MedGen UID:
334631
Concept ID:
C1842876
Finding
Lack of prominence of the nose resulting from a posteriorly-placed nasal ridge.
Cleft palate
MedGen UID:
756015
Concept ID:
C2981150
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Cafe-au-lait spot
MedGen UID:
113157
Concept ID:
C0221263
Finding
Cafe-au-lait spots are hyperpigmented lesions that can vary in color from light brown to dark brown with smooth borders and having a size of 1.5 cm or more in adults and 0.5 cm or more in children.
Multiple lentigines
MedGen UID:
272242
Concept ID:
C1328931
Disease or Syndrome
Presence of an unusually high number of lentigines (singular
Delayed puberty
MedGen UID:
46203
Concept ID:
C0034012
Pathologic Function
Passing the age when puberty normally occurs with no physical or hormonal signs of the onset of puberty.
Delayed menarche
MedGen UID:
184929
Concept ID:
C0949173
Disease or Syndrome
First period after the age of 15 years.
Ptosis
MedGen UID:
2287
Concept ID:
C0005745
Disease or Syndrome
The upper eyelid margin is positioned 3 mm or more lower than usual and covers the superior portion of the iris (objective); or, the upper lid margin obscures at least part of the pupil (subjective).
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (see 300000), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Kavamura MI, Leoni C, Neri G
Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2022 Dec;190(4):452-458. Epub 2022 Dec 21 doi: 10.1002/ajmg.c.32027. PMID: 36541891
Lioncino M, Monda E, Verrillo F, Moscarella E, Calcagni G, Drago F, Marino B, Digilio MC, Putotto C, Calabrò P, Russo MG, Roberts AE, Gelb BD, Tartaglia M, Limongelli G
Heart Fail Clin 2022 Jan;18(1):19-29. Epub 2021 Oct 25 doi: 10.1016/j.hfc.2021.07.004. PMID: 34776080Free PMC Article
Chan W, Fang-tian D, Hua Z, You-xin C, Rong-ping D, Ke T
Chin Med Sci J 2011 Dec;26(4):231-6. doi: 10.1016/s1001-9294(12)60006-6. PMID: 22218051

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