U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 5

1.

Autosomal dominant wooly hair

Woolly hair (WH) refers to a group of hair shaft disorders that are characterized by fine and tightly curled hair. Compared to normal curly hair that is observed in some populations, WH grows slowly and stops growing after a few inches. Under light microscopy, WH shows some structural anomalies, including trichorrhexis nodosa and tapered ends. WH can appear as part of several syndromes, such as Naxos disease (601214) and cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (115150) (summary by Petukhova et al., 2009). See 278150 for a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive woolly hair. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
348571
Concept ID:
C1860238
Finding
2.

Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome

Van den Ende-Gupta syndrome (VDEGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe contractual arachnodactyly from birth and distinctive facial dysmorphism, including triangular face, malar hypoplasia, narrow nose, everted lips, and blepharophimosis. Skeletal anomalies include slender ribs, hooked clavicles, and dislocated radial head. There is no neurologic involvement (summary by Patel et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
322127
Concept ID:
C1833136
Disease or Syndrome
3.

DEGCAGS syndrome

DEGCAGS syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, coarse and dysmorphic facial features, and poor growth and feeding apparent from infancy. Affected individuals have variable systemic manifestations often with significant structural defects of the cardiovascular, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and/or skeletal systems. Additional features may include sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, anemia or pancytopenia, and immunodeficiency with recurrent infections. Death in childhood may occur (summary by Bertoli-Avella et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794177
Concept ID:
C5561967
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Rombo syndrome

Rombo syndrome has characteristics of vermiculate atrophoderma, milia, hypotrichosis, trichoepitheliomas, and peripheral vasodilation with cyanosis and basal cell carcinomas. It has been described in four generations of one family and in two additional sporadic cases. The skin lesions become visible between 7 and 10 years of age and are most pronounced on the face. Basal cell carcinomas are frequent and develop at around 35 years of age. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
356704
Concept ID:
C1867147
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Abnormal eyebrow morphology

An abnormality of the eyebrow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
859993
Concept ID:
C4011556
Anatomical Abnormality
Format

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity