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1.

Cerebral cavernous malformation

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations in the brain and spinal cord comprising closely clustered, enlarged capillary channels (caverns) with a single layer of endothelium without mature vessel wall elements or normal intervening brain parenchyma. The diameter of CCMs ranges from a few millimeters to several centimeters. CCMs increase or decrease in size and increase in number over time. Hundreds of lesions may be identified, depending on the person's age and the quality and type of brain imaging used. Although CCMs have been reported in infants and children, the majority become evident between the second and fifth decades with findings such as seizures, focal neurologic deficits, nonspecific headaches, and cerebral hemorrhage. Up to 50% of individuals with FCCM remain symptom free throughout their lives. Cutaneous vascular lesions are found in 9% of those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCM; see Diagnosis/testing) and retinal vascular lesions in almost 5%. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
418825
Concept ID:
C2919945
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Tyrosinemia type II

Tyrosinemia type II (TYRSN2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by keratitis, painful palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated serum tyrosine levels. The disorder is caused by deficiency of hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (Natt et al., 1992). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75687
Concept ID:
C0268487
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Megaloblastic anemia, thiamine-responsive, with diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness

Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMA) is characterized by megaloblastic anemia, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and diabetes mellitus. Onset of megaloblastic anemia occurs between infancy and adolescence. The anemia is corrected with thiamine treatment, but the red cells remain macrocytic and anemia can recur if treatment is withdrawn. Progressive sensorineural hearing loss often occurs early and can be detected in toddlers; hearing loss is irreversible and may not be prevented by thiamine treatment. The diabetes mellitus is non-type I in nature, with age of onset from infancy to adolescence. Thiamine treatment may reduce insulin requirement and delay onset of diabetes in some individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
83338
Concept ID:
C0342287
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Freeman-Sheldon syndrome

Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS), or DA2A, is phenotypically similar to DA1. In addition to contractures of the hands and feet, FSS is characterized by oropharyngeal abnormalities, scoliosis, and a distinctive face that includes a very small oral orifice (often only a few millimeters in diameter at birth), puckered lips, and an H-shaped dimple of the chin; hence, FSS has been called 'whistling face syndrome.' The limb phenotypes of DA1 and FSS may be so similar that they can only be distinguished by the differences in facial morphology (summary by Bamshad et al., 2009). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of distal arthrogryposis, see DA1 (108120). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120516
Concept ID:
C0265224
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Vitamin D-dependent rickets type II with alopecia

Vitamin D-dependent rickets type 2A (VDDR2A) is caused by a defect in the vitamin D receptor gene. This defect leads to an increase in the circulating ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Most patients have total alopecia in addition to rickets. VDDR2B (600785) is a form of vitamin D-dependent rickets with a phenotype similar to VDDR2A but a normal vitamin D receptor, in which end-organ resistance to vitamin D has been shown to be caused by a nuclear ribonucleoprotein that interferes with the vitamin D receptor-DNA interaction. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rickets due to disorders in vitamin D metabolism or action, see vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1A (VDDR1A; 264700). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
90989
Concept ID:
C0342646
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Osteogenesis imperfecta type 11

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. OI type XI is an autosomal recessive form of OI (summary by Alanay et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462568
Concept ID:
C3151218
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Multiple self-healing squamous epithelioma

Individuals with multiple self-healing squamous epithelioma (MSSE) develop multiple invasive skin tumors that undergo spontaneous regression leaving pitted scars. Age at onset is highly variable, ranging from 8 to 62 years. The disorder shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and most affected families have originated from western Scotland (Bose et al., 2006). MSSE has been considered to be a variety of multiple keratoacanthoma (Biskind et al., 1957; Haydey et al., 1980). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
154270
Concept ID:
C0546476
Neoplastic Process
8.

Aicardi syndrome

Aicardi syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects primarily females. Initially it was characterized by a typical triad of agenesis of the corpus callosum, central chorioretinal lacunae, and infantile spasms. As more affected individuals have been ascertained, it has become clear that not all affected girls have all three features of the classic triad and that other neurologic and systemic defects are common, including other brain malformations, optic nerve abnormalities, other seizure types, intellectual disability of varying severity, and scoliosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
61236
Concept ID:
C0175713
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Insect Stings, hypersensitivity to

MedGen UID:
327045
Concept ID:
C1840171
Finding
10.

Glomuvenous malformation

Glomuvenous malformations, also known as 'venous malformations with glomus cells' or glomangiomas, are similar to mucocutaneous venous malformations (VMCM; 600195), but clinically are distinguishable: they have a cobble-stone appearance, have a consistency harder than that of venous malformations, and are painful on palpation. Histologically, GVMs are distinguishable by the presence of pathognomonic rounded cells (glomus cells) around the distended vein-like channels. The term glomus (Latin for ball) stems from the morphologically similar contractile cells of the Sucquet-Hoyer arteriovenous anastomoses in glomus bodies that are involved in cutaneous thermoregulation. Glomus cells in GVMs appear to be incompletely or improperly differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells, since they stain positively with smooth muscle cell alpha-actin (102620) and vimentin (193060) (summary by Brouillard et al., 2002). The genetic distinctness of glomuvenous malformations from mucocutaneous venous malformations is indicated by the fact that mutations have been found in the TIE2/TEK gene (600221) in mucocutaneous venous malformations and not in glomuvenous malformations. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
374834
Concept ID:
C1841984
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Plasminogen deficiency, type I

Congenital plasminogen deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by chronic mucosal pseudomembranous lesions consisting of subepithelial fibrin deposition and inflammation. The most common clinical manifestation is ligneous ('wood-like') conjunctivitis, a redness and subsequent formation of pseudomembranes mostly on the palpebral surfaces of the eye that progress to white, yellow-white, or red thick masses with a wood-like consistency that replace the normal mucosa. The lesions may be triggered by local injury and/or infection and often recur after local excision. Pseudomembranous lesions of other mucous membranes often occur in the mouth, nasopharynx, trachea, and female genital tract. Some affected children also have congenital occlusive hydrocephalus. A slightly increased female:male ratio has been observed (1.4:1 to 2:1) (Schuster and Seregard, 2003; Tefs et al., 2006). Type I plasminogen deficiency is characterized by decreased serum plasminogen activity, decreased plasminogen antigen levels, and clinical symptoms, whereas type II plasminogen deficiency, also known as 'dysplasminogenemia,' is characterized by decreased plasminogen activity with normal or slightly reduced antigen levels. Patients with type II deficiency are usually asymptomatic. Ligneous conjunctivitis and pseudomembranous formation has only been associated with type I plasminogen deficiency. Presumably, normal amounts of plasminogen antigen with decreased activity, as seen in type II, is sufficient for normal wound healing (Schuster and Seregard, 2003). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
369859
Concept ID:
C1968804
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Systemic lupus erythematosus, susceptibility to, 6

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease that causes inflammation in connective tissues, such as cartilage and the lining of blood vessels, which provide strength and flexibility to structures throughout the body. The signs and symptoms of SLE vary among affected individuals, and can involve many organs and systems, including the skin, joints, kidneys, lungs, central nervous system, and blood-forming (hematopoietic) system. SLE is one of a large group of conditions called autoimmune disorders that occur when the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs.

SLE may first appear as extreme tiredness (fatigue), a vague feeling of discomfort or illness (malaise), fever, loss of appetite, and weight loss. Most affected individuals also have joint pain, typically affecting the same joints on both sides of the body, and muscle pain and weakness. Skin problems are common in SLE. A characteristic feature is a flat red rash across the cheeks and bridge of the nose, called a "butterfly rash" because of its shape. The rash, which generally does not hurt or itch, often appears or becomes more pronounced when exposed to sunlight. Other skin problems that may occur in SLE include calcium deposits under the skin (calcinosis), damaged blood vessels (vasculitis) in the skin, and tiny red spots called petechiae. Petechiae are caused by a shortage of cells involved in clotting (platelets), which leads to bleeding under the skin. Affected individuals may also have hair loss (alopecia) and open sores (ulcerations) in the moist lining (mucosae) of the mouth, nose, or, less commonly, the genitals.

People with SLE have episodes in which the condition gets worse (exacerbations) and other times when it gets better (remissions). Overall, SLE gradually gets worse over time, and damage to the major organs of the body can be life-threatening.

About a third of people with SLE develop kidney disease (nephritis). Heart problems may also occur in SLE, including inflammation of the sac-like membrane around the heart (pericarditis) and abnormalities of the heart valves, which control blood flow in the heart. Heart disease caused by fatty buildup in the blood vessels (atherosclerosis), which is very common in the general population, is even more common in people with SLE. The inflammation characteristic of SLE can also damage the nervous system, and may result in abnormal sensation and weakness in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy); seizures; stroke; and difficulty processing, learning, and remembering information (cognitive impairment). Anxiety and depression are also common in SLE. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
332086
Concept ID:
C1835919
Finding
13.

Hypotrichosis 7

Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a condition that affects hair growth. People with this condition have sparse hair (hypotrichosis) on the scalp beginning in infancy. This hair is usually coarse, dry, and tightly curled (often described as woolly hair). Scalp hair may also be lighter in color than expected and is fragile and easily broken. Affected individuals often cannot grow hair longer than a few inches. The eyebrows, eyelashes, and other body hair may be sparse as well. Over time, the hair problems can remain stable or progress to complete scalp hair loss (alopecia) and a decrease in body hair.

Rarely, people with autosomal recessive hypotrichosis have skin problems affecting areas with sparse hair, such as redness (erythema), itchiness (pruritus), or missing patches of skin (erosions) on the scalp. In areas of poor hair growth, they may also develop bumps called hyperkeratotic follicular papules that develop around hair follicles, which are specialized structures in the skin where hair growth occurs. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
322969
Concept ID:
C1836672
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Acromial dimples

Acromial dimples are skin depressions overlying the acromial process of the scapula. They are thought to arise from the entrapment of tissue between a bony structure and the uterine wall. The skin and bone become compressed and tethering results when the pressure is released. They are usually bilateral and are an isolated finding warranting no further investigation (summary by Liu and Nanan, 2008). Acromial dimples occur as a virtually consistent feature of 18q deletion (Insley, 1967). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
869278
Concept ID:
C4023704
Finding
15.

Normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis

MedGen UID:
355311
Concept ID:
C1864861
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Amelogenesis imperfecta type 1A

Hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta IA is characterized by enamel that may not develop to normal thickness. The enamel may have pits on the labial or buccal surfaces that are often arranged in rows and columns (see Witkop, 1989). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
859840
Concept ID:
C4011403
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Multiple symmetric lipomatosis

Multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the growth of unencapsulated masses of adipose tissue with predilection for the cervical and thoracic regions. The lipoma growth is striking and disfiguring, and growth around the neck may cause difficulty swallowing or breathing. The age at onset ranges from childhood to young adulthood. Most, but not all, patients develop axonal peripheral neuropathy, which can appear at any age and varies in severity. Laboratory studies in MSL show low leptin (164160), low adiponectin (605441), variably increased lactate, and increased FGF21 (609436). Some patients may have insulin resistance. The disorder is exclusively associated with a particular MFN2 mutation (R707W; 608507.0013), usually in the homozygous state, but sometimes in the compound heterozygous state (Rocha et al., 2017; Capel et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7349
Concept ID:
C0023804
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Hypotrichosis 12

Any hypotrichosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the RPL21 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
863000
Concept ID:
C4014563
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Hypotrichosis 1

Hereditary hypotrichosis simplex (HHS) is a rare form of nonsyndromic hereditary hypotrichosis without characteristic hair shaft anomalies. Affected individuals typically show normal hair at birth, but hair loss and thinning of the hair shaft start during early childhood and progress with age. HHS can be largely divided into 2 forms: the scalp-limited form (e.g., 146520) and the generalized form, such as HYPT1, in which all body hair is affected. HHS is characterized by progressive hair follicle miniaturization, which is a typical feature of androgenetic alopecia (see 109200). HHS can be inherited either as an autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive trait (e.g., HYPT8, 278150) (summary by Shimomura et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Nonsyndromic Hypotrichosis See also HYPT2 (146520), caused by mutation in the CDSN gene (602593) on chromosome 6p21; HYPT3 (613981), caused by mutation in the KRT74 gene (608248) on chromosome 12q13; HYPT4 (146550), caused by mutation in the HRURF gene (619257) on chromosome 8p21; HYPT5 (612841), caused by mutation in the EPS8L3 gene (614989) on chromosome 1p13; HYPT6 (607903), caused by mutation in the DSG4 gene (607892) on chromosome 18q12; HYPT7 (604379), caused by mutation in the LIPH gene (607365) on chromosome 3q27; HYPT8 (278150), caused by mutation in the LPAR6 gene (609239) on chromosome 13q14; HYPT9 (614237), mapped to chromosome 10q11.23-q22.3; HYPT10 (614238), mapped to chromosome 7p22.3-p21.3; HYPT11 (615059), caused by mutation in the SNRPE gene (128260) on chromosome 1q32; HYPT12 (615885), caused by mutation in the RPL21 gene (603636) on chromosome 13q12; HYPT13 (615896), caused by mutation in the KRT71 gene (608245) on chromosome 12q13; HYPT14 (618275), caused by mutation in the LSS gene (600909) on chromosome 21q22; and HYPT15 (620177), caused by mutation in the C3ORF52 gene (611956) on chromosome 3q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1644234
Concept ID:
C4551976
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Ectodermal dysplasia 7, hair/nail type

Some ectodermal dysplasias are here classified as congenital disorders characterized by abnormal development in 2 or more ectodermal structures (hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands) without other systemic findings. Ectodermal dysplasia of the hair/nail type is a rare congenital condition characterized by hypotrichosis and nail dystrophy without nonectodermal or other ectodermal manifestations. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
767031
Concept ID:
C3554117
Disease or Syndrome
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