U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 9

1.

Heterotaxy, visceral, 1, X-linked

Heterotaxy Heterotaxy ('heter' meaning 'other' and 'taxy' meaning 'arrangement'), or situs ambiguus, is a developmental condition characterized by randomization of the placement of visceral organs, including the heart, lungs, liver, spleen, and stomach. The organs are oriented randomly with respect to the left-right axis and with respect to one another (Srivastava, 1997). Heterotaxy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Multiple Types of Congenital Heart Defects Congenital heart defects (CHTD) are among the most common congenital defects, occurring with an incidence of 8/1,000 live births. The etiology of CHTD is complex, with contributions from environmental exposure, chromosomal abnormalities, and gene defects. Some patients with CHTD also have cardiac arrhythmias, which may be due to the anatomic defect itself or to surgical interventions (summary by van de Meerakker et al., 2011). Reviews Obler et al. (2008) reviewed published cases of double-outlet right ventricle and discussed etiology and associations. Genetic Heterogeneity of Visceral Heterotaxy See also HTX2 (605376), caused by mutation in the CFC1 gene (605194) on chromosome 2q21; HTX3 (606325), which maps to chromosome 6q21; HTX4 (613751), caused by mutation in the ACVR2B gene (602730) on chromosome 3p22; HTX5 (270100), caused by mutation in the NODAL gene (601265) on chromosome 10q22; HTX6 (614779), caused by mutation in the CCDC11 gene (614759) on chromosome 18q21; HTX7 (616749), caused by mutation in the MMP21 gene (608416) on chromosome 10q26; HTX8 (617205), caused by mutation in the PKD1L1 gene (609721) on chromosome 7p12; HTX9 (618948), caused by mutation in the MNS1 gene (610766) on chromosome 15q21; HTX10 (619607), caused by mutation in the CFAP52 gene (609804) on chromosome 17p13; HTX11 (619608), caused by mutation in the CFAP45 gene (605152) on chromosome 1q23; and HTX12 (619702), caused by mutation in the CIROP gene (619703) on chromosome 14q11. Genetic Heterogeneity of Multiple Types of Congenital Heart Defects An X-linked form of CHTD, CHTD1, is caused by mutation in the ZIC3 gene on chromosome Xq26. CHTD2 (614980) is caused by mutation in the TAB2 gene (605101) on chromosome 6q25. A form of nonsyndromic congenital heart defects associated with cardiac rhythm and conduction disturbances (CHTD3; 614954) has been mapped to chromosome 9q31. CHTD4 (615779) is caused by mutation in the NR2F2 gene (107773) on chromosome 15q26. CHTD5 (617912) is caused by mutation in the GATA5 gene (611496) on chromosome 20q13. CHTD6 (613854) is caused by mutation in the GDF1 gene (602880) on chromosome 19p13. CHTD7 (618780) is caused by mutation in the FLT4 gene (136352) on chromosome 5q35. CHTD8 (619657) is caused by mutation in the SMAD2 gene (601366) on chromosome 18q21. CHTD9 (620294) is caused by mutation in the PLXND1 gene (604282) on chromosome 3q22. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
336609
Concept ID:
C1844020
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Neural tube defects, susceptibility to

Neural tube defects are the second most common type of birth defect after congenital heart defects. The 2 most common NTDs are open spina bifida, also known as spina bifida cystica (SBC) or myelomeningocele, and anencephaly (see 206500) (Detrait et al., 2005). Spina bifida occulta (SBO), a bony defect of the spine covered by normal skin, is a mild form of spina bifida that is often asymptomatic. The term 'spinal dysraphia' refers to both SBC and SBO (Botto et al., 1999; Fineman et al., 1982). The most severe neural tube defect, craniorachischisis (CRN), leaves the neural tube open from the midbrain or rostral hindbrain to the base of the spine (summary by Robinson et al., 2012). Neural tube defects represent a complex trait with multifactorial etiology encompassing both genetic and environmental components (summary by Bartsch et al., 2012 and Lei et al., 2014). An X-linked form of spina bifida has been suggested; see 301410. See also folate-sensitive neural tube defects (601634), which are caused by genes involved in folate metabolism. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
856010
Concept ID:
C3891448
Finding
3.

Currarino triad

The Currarino syndrome is an autosomal dominant form of hereditary sacral dysgenesis that classically consists of the triad of sacral malformation, presacral mass, and anorectal malformations. However, other features include neonatal-onset bowel obstruction, chronic constipation, recurrent perianal sepsis, renal/urinary tract anomalies, female internal genital anomalies, tethered spinal cord, and anterior meningocele. There is marked inter- and intrafamilial variability, and up to 33% of patients are asymptomatic (summary by Wang et al., 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
323460
Concept ID:
C1531773
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Heterotaxy, visceral, 5, autosomal

Heterotaxy ('heter' meaning 'other' and 'taxy' meaning 'arrangement'), or situs ambiguus, is a developmental condition characterized by randomization of the placement of visceral organs, including the heart, lungs, liver, spleen, and stomach. The organs are oriented randomly with respect to the left-right axis and with respect to one another (Srivastava, 1997). Heterotaxy is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of visceral heterotaxy, see HTX1 (306955). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
501198
Concept ID:
C3495537
Congenital Abnormality
5.

Sacral defect with anterior meningocele

Sacral defect with anterior meningocele (SDAM) is a form of caudal dysgenesis. It is present at birth and becomes symptomatic later in life, usually because of obstructive labor in females, chronic constipation, or meningitis. Inheritance is autosomal dominant (Chatkupt et al., 1994). Welch and Aterman (1984) gave a population frequency of 0.14%. Caudal dysgenesis syndrome and caudal regression syndrome are broad terms that refer to a heterogeneous constellation of congenital caudal anomalies affecting the caudal spine and spinal cord, the hindgut, the urogenital system, and the lower limbs. Approximately 15 to 25% of mothers of children with caudal dysgenesis have insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (222100) (Lynch et al., 2000). See also Currarino syndrome (176450), a similar disorder caused by mutation in the HLXB9 gene (142994) on chromosome 7q36. Currarino syndrome classically comprises the triad of hemisacrum, anorectal malformation, and presacral mass. However, Currarino syndrome also shows phenotypic variability: Lynch et al. (2000) stated that there is variable expressivity of clinical features and that some patients with Currarino syndrome are asymptomatic. Kochling et al. (2001) found the complete triad of Currarino syndrome in only 8 of 23 patients with mutations in the HLXB9 gene, These reports suggest that some patients previously reported as having forms of sacral agenesis, including SDAM, may have had Currarino syndrome and vice versa. See also spina bifida (182940), which can be seen in some patients with sacral agenesis or caudal regression syndrome and may be etiologically related. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
325455
Concept ID:
C1838568
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Exstrophy-epispadias complex

Carey et al. (1978) gave the name OEIS complex to a combination of defects comprising omphalocele, exstrophy of the cloaca, imperforate anus, and spinal defects. This rare complex is thought to represent the most severe end of a spectrum of birth defects, the exstrophy-epispadias sequence, which, in order of increasing severity, includes phallic separation with epispadias, pubic diastasis, exstrophy of the bladder (600057), cloacal exstrophy, and OEIS complex. Very few instances of recurrence of anomalies in this cluster have been reported. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
338020
Concept ID:
C1850321
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Vertebral, cardiac, renal, and limb defects syndrome 1

Vertebral, cardiac, renal, and limb defects syndrome-1 (VCRL1) is an autosomal recessive congenital malformation syndrome characterized by vertebral segmentation abnormalities, congenital cardiac defects, renal defects, and mild distal limb defects. Additional features are variable (summary by Shi et al., 2017). Genetic Heterogeneity of Vertebral, Cardiac, Renal, and Limb Defects Syndrome See also VCRL2 (617661), caused by mutation in the KYNU gene (605197) on chromosome 2q22, and VCRL3 (618845), caused by mutation in the NADSYN1 gene (608285) on chromosome 11q13. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1621146
Concept ID:
C4540004
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Sacral agenesis-abnormal ossification of the vertebral bodies-persistent notochordal canal syndrome

Sacral agenesis-abnormal ossification of the vertebral bodies-persistent notochordal canal syndrome is a rare, genetic, neural tube defect malformation syndrome characterized by sacral agenesis and abnormal vertebral body ossification with normal vertebral arches associated with notochord canal persistence on ultrasonography. Additional findings include bilateral clubfoot, oligohydramnios, single umbilical artery and, in some, increased nuchal translucency. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
816673
Concept ID:
C3810343
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Absence of the sacrum

Absence (aplasia) of the sacrum. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
83373
Concept ID:
C0344490
Congenital Abnormality
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity