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1.

Cholestanol storage disease

Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a lipid storage disease characterized by infantile-onset diarrhea, childhood-onset cataract, adolescent- to young adult-onset tendon xanthomas, and adult-onset progressive neurologic dysfunction (dementia, psychiatric disturbances, pyramidal and/or cerebellar signs, dystonia, atypical parkinsonism, peripheral neuropathy, and seizures). Chronic diarrhea from infancy and/or neonatal cholestasis may be the earliest clinical manifestation. In approximately 75% of affected individuals, cataracts are the first finding, often appearing in the first decade of life. Xanthomas appear in the second or third decade; they occur on the Achilles tendon, the extensor tendons of the elbow and hand, the patellar tendon, and the neck tendons. Xanthomas have been reported in the lung, bones, and central nervous system. Some individuals show cognitive impairment from early infancy, whereas the majority have normal or only slightly impaired intellectual function until puberty; dementia with slow deterioration in intellectual abilities occurs in the third decade in more than 50% of individuals. Neuropsychiatric symptoms such as behavioral changes, hallucinations, agitation, aggression, depression, and suicide attempts may be prominent. Pyramidal signs (i.e., spasticity) and/or cerebellar signs almost invariably become evident between ages 20 and 30 years. The biochemical abnormalities that distinguish CTX from other conditions with xanthomas include high plasma and tissue cholestanol concentration, normal-to-low plasma cholesterol concentration, decreased chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), increased concentration of bile alcohols and their glyconjugates, and increased concentrations of cholestanol and apolipoprotein B in cerebrospinal fluid. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
116041
Concept ID:
C0238052
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hyper-IgM syndrome type 1

X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM1), a disorder of abnormal T- and B-cell function, is characterized by low serum concentrations of IgG, IgA, and IgE with normal or elevated serum concentrations of IgM. Mitogen proliferation may be normal, but NK- and T-cell cytotoxicity can be impaired. Antigen-specific responses are usually decreased or absent. Total numbers of B cells are normal but there is a marked reduction of class-switched memory B cells. Defective oxidative burst of both neutrophils and macrophages has been reported. The range of clinical findings varies, even within the same family. More than 50% of males with HIGM1 develop symptoms by age one year, and more than 90% are symptomatic by age four years. HIGM1 usually presents in infancy with recurrent upper- and lower-respiratory tract bacterial infections, opportunistic infections including Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, and recurrent or protracted diarrhea that can be infectious or noninfectious and is associated with failure to thrive. Neutropenia is common; thrombocytopenia and anemia are less commonly seen. Autoimmune and/or inflammatory disorders (such as sclerosing cholangitis) as well as increased risk for neoplasms have been reported as medical complications of this disorder. Significant neurologic complications, often the result of a CNS infection, are seen in 5%-15% of affected males. Liver disease, a serious complication of HIGM1 once observed in more than 80% of affected males by age 20 years, may be decreasing with adequate screening and treatment of Cryptosporidium infection. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
96019
Concept ID:
C0398689
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 35

Fatty acid hydroxylase-associated neurodegeneration (FAHN) is characterized early in the disease course by central nervous system involvement including corticospinal tract involvement (spasticity), mixed movement disorder (ataxia/dystonia), and eye findings (optic atrophy, oculomotor abnormalities), and later in the disease course by progressive intellectual impairment and seizures. With disease progression, dystonia and spasticity compromise the ability to ambulate, leading to wheelchair dependence. Life expectancy is variable. FAHN is considered to be a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
501249
Concept ID:
C3496228
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 11

Spastic paraplegia 11 (SPG11) is characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs frequently associated with the following: mild intellectual disability with learning difficulties in childhood and/or progressive cognitive decline; peripheral neuropathy; pseudobulbar involvement; and increased reflexes in the upper limbs. Less frequent findings include: cerebellar signs (ataxia, nystagmus, saccadic pursuit); retinal degeneration; pes cavus; scoliosis; and parkinsonism with characteristic brain MRI features that include thinning of the corpus callosum. Onset occurs mainly during infancy or adolescence (range: age 1-31 years) and in rare cases as late as age 60 years. Most affected individuals become wheelchair bound one or two decades after disease onset. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
388073
Concept ID:
C1858479
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6

Frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-6 (FTDALS6) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder with highly variable manifestations. Some patients present in adulthood with progressive FTD, often classified as the 'behavioral variant,' which is characterized by reduced empathy, impulsive behavior, personality changes, and reduced verbal output. Other patients present with features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), which is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction resulting in rapidly progressive paralysis and death from respiratory failure. The pathologic hallmarks of this disease include pallor of the corticospinal tract due to loss of motor neurons (in ALS). In both ALS and FTD, there are ubiquitin-positive inclusions within surviving neurons as well as deposition of pathologic TDP43 (TARDBP; 605078) or p62 (SQSTM1; 601530) aggregates. Patients with a D395G mutation (601023.0014) have been shown to develop pathologic tau (MAPT; 157140) aggregates. Some patients with the disorder may have features of both diseases, and there is significant interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (summary by Johnson et al., 2010; Wong et al., 2018; Al-Obeidi et al., 2018; Darwich et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of FTDALS, see FTDALS1 (105550). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1759760
Concept ID:
C5436279
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Autosomal recessive Parkinson disease 14

Parkinson's disease can also affect emotions and thinking ability (cognition). Some affected individuals develop psychiatric conditions such as depression and visual hallucinations. People with Parkinson's disease also have an increased risk of developing dementia, which is a decline in intellectual functions including judgment and memory.

Generally, Parkinson's disease that begins after age 50 is called late-onset disease. The condition is described as early-onset disease if signs and symptoms begin before age 50. Early-onset cases that begin before age 20 are sometimes referred to as juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease.

Often the first symptom of Parkinson's disease is trembling or shaking (tremor) of a limb, especially when the body is at rest. Typically, the tremor begins on one side of the body, usually in one hand. Tremors can also affect the arms, legs, feet, and face. Other characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease include rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and torso, slow movement (bradykinesia) or an inability to move (akinesia), and impaired balance and coordination (postural instability). These symptoms worsen slowly over time.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects several regions of the brain, especially an area called the substantia nigra that controls balance and movement. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
414488
Concept ID:
C2751842
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria

Complex cortical dysplasia with other brain malformations-14A (CDCBM14A) is an autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by global developmental delay with impaired intellectual development, motor delay, poor speech development, and early-onset seizures, often focal or atypical absence. Additional features may include strabismus, nystagmus, exo- or esotropia, axial hypotonia, and spasticity. Brain imaging shows bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria, a frontal-predominant cobblestone malformation of the cortex, scalloping of the cortical/white matter junction, enlarged ventricles, and hypoplasia of the pons, brainstem, and cerebellum. The disorder can be classified as a malformation of cortical development (summary by Parrini et al., 2009; Luo et al., 2011; Zulfiqar et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CDCBM, see CDCBM1 (614039). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
376107
Concept ID:
C1847352
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Troyer syndrome

Troyer syndrome is characterized by progressive spastic paraparesis, dysarthria, pseudobulbar palsy, distal amyotrophy, short stature, and subtle skeletal abnormalities. Most affected children exhibit delays in walking and speech and difficulty in managing oral secretions, followed by increased lower-limb spasticity and slow deterioration in both gait and speech. Mild cerebellar signs are common. The most severely affected individuals have choreoathetosis. Emotional lability / difficulty in controlling emotions and affective disorders, such as inappropriate euphoria and/or crying, are frequently described. Life expectancy is normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
97950
Concept ID:
C0393559
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 10

Spastic paraplegia-10 (SPG10) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder with variable manifestations. Some patients have onset of a 'pure' spastic paraplegia, with lower limb spasticity, hyperreflexia, extensor plantar responses, and variable involvement of the upper limbs beginning in childhood or young adulthood. Some patients show distal sensory impairment, which can be part of the 'pure' phenotype. However, some patients also show an axonal sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with distal sensory impairment and distal muscle atrophy reminiscent of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (see, e.g., CMT2A, 118210). Rarely, patients with KIF5A mutations may have additional neurologic features, including parkinsonism or cognitive decline, consistent with a 'complicated' phenotype. Spastic paraplegia and peripheral neuropathy in isolation may represent extreme ends of the phenotypic spectrum of KIF5A mutations (summary by Goizet et al., 2009 and Crimella et al., 2012). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
349003
Concept ID:
C1858712
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Warburg micro syndrome 3

RAB18 deficiency is the molecular deficit underlying both Warburg micro syndrome (characterized by eye, nervous system, and endocrine abnormalities) and Martsolf syndrome (characterized by similar – but milder – findings). To date Warburg micro syndrome comprises >96% of reported individuals with genetically defined RAB18 deficiency. The hallmark ophthalmologic findings are bilateral congenital cataracts, usually accompanied by microphthalmia, microcornea (diameter <10), and small atonic pupils. Poor vision despite early cataract surgery likely results from progressive optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment. Individuals with Warburg micro syndrome have severe to profound intellectual disability (ID); those with Martsolf syndrome have mild to moderate ID. Some individuals with RAB18 deficiency also have epilepsy. In Warburg micro syndrome, a progressive ascending spastic paraplegia typically begins with spastic diplegia and contractures during the first year, followed by upper-limb involvement leading to spastic quadriplegia after about age five years, often eventually causing breathing difficulties. In Martsolf syndrome infantile hypotonia is followed primarily by slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity. Hypogonadism – when present – manifests in both syndromes, in males as micropenis and/or cryptorchidism and in females as hypoplastic labia minora, clitoral hypoplasia, and small introitus. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
481833
Concept ID:
C3280203
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Brown-Vialetto-van Laere syndrome 1

Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurologic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and a variety of cranial nerve palsies, usually involving the motor components of the seventh and ninth to twelfth (more rarely the third, fifth, and sixth) cranial nerves. Spinal motor nerves and, less commonly, upper motor neurons are sometimes affected, giving a picture resembling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; 105400). The onset of the disease is usually in the second decade, but earlier and later onset have been reported. Hearing loss tends to precede the onset of neurologic signs, mostly progressive muscle weakness causing respiratory compromise. However, patients with very early onset may present with bulbar palsy and may not develop hearing loss until later. The symptoms, severity, and disease duration are variable (summary by Green et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome See also BVVLS2 (614707), caused by mutation in the SLC52A2 gene (607882) on chromosome 8q. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
163239
Concept ID:
C0796274
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 30

Spastic paraplegia-30A (SPG30A) is a neurologic disorder characterized by onset of slowly progressive spastic paraplegia in the first or second decades of life. Affected individuals have unsteady spastic gait and hyperreflexia of the lower limbs. Most patients have a 'pure' form of the disorder, limited to spastic paraplegia, whereas some may have a 'complicated' form that includes mild cognitive dysfunction, learning disabilities, or behavioral abnormalities, peripheral axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, and urinary sphincter problems. The phenotypic features represent a spectrum of abnormalities of the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous system (summary by Pennings et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1710020
Concept ID:
C5235139
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 8B

The overlapping phenotypes of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum disease (IRD) represent the milder manifestations of the Zellweger syndrome spectrum (ZSS) of peroxisome biogenesis disorders. The clinical course of patients with the NALD and IRD presentation is variable and may include developmental delay, hypotonia, liver dysfunction, sensorineural hearing loss, retinal dystrophy, and visual impairment. Children with the NALD presentation may reach their teens, and those with the IRD presentation may reach adulthood (summary by Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a complete phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PBD(NALD/IRD), see 601539. Individuals with mutations in the PEX16 gene have cells of complementation group 9 (CG9, equivalent to CGD). For information on the history of PBD complementation groups, see 214100. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766874
Concept ID:
C3553960
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 31

Spastic paraplegia-31 (SPG31) is an autosomal dominant neurologic disorder characterized primarily by spasticity of the lower limbs, resulting in gait abnormalities and muscle weakness. There is a bimodal age at onset with a peak in the second and fourth decades of life. Most affected individuals have a 'pure' form of the disorder with gait difficulties and hyperreflexia of the lower limbs. However, there is phenotypic heterogeneity, and some patients have a 'complex' form of the disorder with additional signs and symptoms, such as peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, postural tremor, or urinary symptoms. The disorder is slowly progressive, and there is intrafamilial variability and incomplete penetrance (summary by Goizet et al., 2011 and Toft et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
377858
Concept ID:
C1853247
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5

For a general discussion of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), see SCA1 (164400). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
155705
Concept ID:
C0752123
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Ataxia-pancytopenia syndrome

SAMD9L ataxia-pancytopenia (ATXPC) syndrome is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, variable hematologic cytopenias, and predisposition to marrow failure, myelodysplasia, and myeloid leukemia, sometimes associated with monosomy 7. The onset of hematologic abnormalities has been reported as early as age three months. The cytopenias in all cell lineages range from mild to very severe. Onset of neurologic impairment is variable. Nystagmus, dysmetria, increased deep tendon reflexes, and clonus are common. Gait impairment and other neurologic abnormalities are slowly progressive. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
230896
Concept ID:
C1327919
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hypermanganesemia with dystonia 2

SLC39A14 deficiency is characterized by evidence between ages six months and three years of delay or loss of motor developmental milestones (e.g., delayed walking, gait disturbance). Early in the disease course, children show axial hypotonia followed by dystonia, spasticity, dysarthria, bulbar dysfunction, and signs of parkinsonism including bradykinesia, hypomimia, and tremor. By the end of the first decade they develop severe, generalized, pharmaco-resistant dystonia, limb contractures, and scoliosis, and lose independent ambulation. Cognitive impairment appears to be less prominent than motor disability. Some affected children have succumbed in their first decade due to secondary complications such as respiratory infections. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
934732
Concept ID:
C4310765
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 3

Multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, lack of psychomotor development, seizures, dysmorphic features, and variable congenital anomalies involving the cardiac, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems. Most affected individuals die before 3 years of age (summary by Maydan et al., 2011). The disorder is caused by a defect in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis. For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of MCAHS, see MCAHS1 (614080). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of GPI biosynthesis defects, see GPIBD1 (610293). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
815686
Concept ID:
C3809356
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia 12

Spastic paraplegia-12 (SPG12) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by lower limb spasticity and hyperreflexia, resulting in walking difficulties. Some patients may have urinary symptoms and distal sensory impairment. Age at onset ranges from childhood to adulthood (summary by Montenegro et al., 2012). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant spastic paraplegia, see SPG3A (182600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
347618
Concept ID:
C1858106
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Early-onset progressive neurodegeneration-blindness-ataxia-spasticity syndrome

Spastic paraplegia-79B (SPG79B) is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder characterized by onset of spastic paraplegia and optic atrophy in the first decade of life. Additional features are variable, but may include peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar ataxia, and cognitive impairment (summary by Rydning et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, see SPG5A (270800). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
815995
Concept ID:
C3809665
Disease or Syndrome
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