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Items: 19

1.
2.

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, type 4

Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is characterized by arterial, intestinal, and/or uterine fragility; thin, translucent skin; easy bruising; characteristic facial appearance (thin vermilion of the lips, micrognathia, narrow nose, prominent eyes); and an aged appearance to the extremities, particularly the hands. Vascular dissection or rupture, gastrointestinal perforation, or organ rupture are the presenting signs in most adults with vEDS. Arterial rupture may be preceded by aneurysm, arteriovenous fistulae, or dissection but also may occur spontaneously. The majority (60%) of individuals with vEDS who are diagnosed before age 18 years are identified because of a positive family history. Neonates may present with clubfoot, hip dislocation, limb deficiency, and/or amniotic bands. Approximately half of children tested for vEDS in the absence of a positive family history present with a major complication at an average age of 11 years. Four minor diagnostic features – distal joint hypermobility, easy bruising, thin skin, and clubfeet – are most often present in those children ascertained without a major complication. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82790
Concept ID:
C0268338
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 2

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
382398
Concept ID:
C2674574
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Loeys-Dietz syndrome 1

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1646567
Concept ID:
C4551955
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Aneurysm-osteoarthritis syndrome

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
462437
Concept ID:
C3151087
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Weill-Marchesani syndrome 2, dominant

Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by abnormalities of the lens of the eye, short stature, brachydactyly, joint stiffness, and cardiovascular defects. The ocular problems, typically recognized in childhood, include microspherophakia (small spherical lens), myopia secondary to the abnormal shape of the lens, ectopia lentis (abnormal position of the lens), and glaucoma, which can lead to blindness. Height of adult males is 142-169 cm; height of adult females is 130-157 cm. Autosomal recessive WMS cannot be distinguished from autosomal dominant WMS by clinical findings alone. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
358388
Concept ID:
C1869115
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Rienhoff syndrome

Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is characterized by vascular findings (cerebral, thoracic, and abdominal arterial aneurysms and/or dissections), skeletal manifestations (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum, scoliosis, joint laxity, arachnodactyly, talipes equinovarus, cervical spine malformation and/or instability), craniofacial features (widely spaced eyes, strabismus, bifid uvula / cleft palate, and craniosynostosis that can involve any sutures), and cutaneous findings (velvety and translucent skin, easy bruising, and dystrophic scars). Individuals with LDS are predisposed to widespread and aggressive arterial aneurysms and pregnancy-related complications including uterine rupture and death. Individuals with LDS can show a strong predisposition for allergic/inflammatory disease including asthma, eczema, and reactions to food or environmental allergens. There is also an increased incidence of gastrointestinal inflammation including eosinophilic esophagitis and gastritis or inflammatory bowel disease. Wide variation in the distribution and severity of clinical features can be seen in individuals with LDS, even among affected individuals within a family who have the same pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
816342
Concept ID:
C3810012
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 6

Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the ACTA2 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
435866
Concept ID:
C2673186
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 7

MedGen UID:
462427
Concept ID:
C3151077
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 4

Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MYH11 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
338704
Concept ID:
C1851504
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 8

Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the PRKG1 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
815843
Concept ID:
C3809513
Disease or Syndrome
12.

MASS syndrome

A genetic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Connective tissue is the material between the cells of the body that gives tissues form and strength. Symptoms include mitral valve prolapse, nearsightedness, borderline and non-progressive aortic enlargement, and skin and skeletal findings that overlap with those seen in Marfan syndrome. Treatment is based on the individuals symptoms. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
346932
Concept ID:
C1858556
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 10

Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the LOX gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
924785
Concept ID:
C4284414
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 9

Any familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the MFAP5 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
863805
Concept ID:
C4015368
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Aortic valve disease 2

Any aortic valve disease in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the SMAD6 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
762200
Concept ID:
C3542024
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Aortic valve disease 3

Aortic valve disease-3 (AOVD3) is characterized by aortic stenosis and/or bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), associated in some patients with aneurysm of the aortic root and/or ascending aorta. Atrial septal defect (ASD) has also been observed in some individuals (Gould et al., 2019). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of aortic valve disease, see AOVD1 (109730). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1681142
Concept ID:
C5193127
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Neuronopathy, distal hereditary motor, autosomal dominant 10

Autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy-10 (HMND10) is a neurologic disorder of the peripheral nerves characterized clinically by length-dependent motor neuropathy primarily affecting the lower limbs. Affected individuals have onset of distal muscle weakness and atrophy in early childhood that results in walking difficulties and gait abnormalities. Some have pyramidal signs, including hyperreflexia, suggesting the involvement of upper motor neurons. Electrophysiologic studies are consistent with a neurogenic process. More variable features may include mild intellectual disability, minor gyration defects on brain imaging, foot deformities, and connective tissue defects (1 family) (Capuano et al., 2016; Iacomino et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant distal HMN, see HMND1 (182960). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1824007
Concept ID:
C5774234
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 12

Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm-12 (AAT12) is characterized by dilation of the arterial wall associated with a progressive loss of its ability to withstand the wall tension generated by high intraluminal pressure, which can lead to intramural or complete acute vessel wall rupture. Some patients have dolichostenomelia (summary by Elbitar et al., 2021). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of thoracic aortic aneurysm, see AAT1 (607086). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1802657
Concept ID:
C5676959
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Ascending aortic dissection

A separation of the layers within the wall of the ascending aorta. Tears in the intimal layer result in the propagation of dissection (proximally or distally) secondary to blood entering the intima-media space. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
322966
Concept ID:
C1836653
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
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