U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 6

1.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis 1

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis-1 (EHK1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of cornification. The disorder usually presents at birth with erythema and blistering and is characterized in adulthood by warty flexural hyperkeratosis with fewer erosions and blisters. Ultrastructural analysis reveals clumping of the intermediate filaments within keratinocytes of the spinous and granular layers (summary by Whittock et al., 2001). A form of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis that is limited to the palms and soles, designated palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK; 144200), can also be caused by mutation in KRT1, as well KRT9 (607606). Genetic Heterogeneity of Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis Mutation in the KRT10 gene (148080) results in both autosomal dominant (EHK2A; 620150) and autosomal recessive (EHK2B; 620707) forms of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1826137
Concept ID:
C5781874
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Annular epidermolytic ichthyosis

A rare clinical variant of epidermolytic ichthyosis, with manifestations of blistering phenotype at birth and the development from early infancy of annular polycyclic erythematous scales on the trunk and extremities. It has been reported in less than 10 families. The disease is caused by mutations in the KRT1 (12q11-q13) and KRT10 (17q21-q23) genes, encoding keratins 1 and 10 respectively. These mutations impair keratin filament formation and weaken the structural stability of the keratinocyte cytoskeleton. Transmission is autosomal dominant. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
334410
Concept ID:
C1843463
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens

Ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS) is an autosomal dominant congenital bullous ichthyosis without erythroderma. Blistering occurs in response to mild physical trauma and results in superficial erosion ('molting') of the outer skin, particularly on flexures, shins, and the periumbilical region. Keratin filament aggregates are seen by electron microscopy in the granular and upper spinous layers of the epidermis (summary by McLean et al., 1994). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
98153
Concept ID:
C0432306
Congenital Abnormality
4.

Palmoplantar keratoderma, nonepidermolytic, focal 1

Focal nonepidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma-1 (FNEPPK1) is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by large, hard, compact, painful masses of keratin that develop at sites of recurrent friction, principally on the feet, though also on the palms and other sites, without evidence of epidermolysis (summary by Kelsell et al., 1995). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1644485
Concept ID:
C4552049
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Ectodermal dysplasia-cutaneous syndactyly syndrome

MedGen UID:
462159
Concept ID:
C3150809
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a skin disorder that is present at birth. Affected babies may have very red skin (erythroderma) and severe blisters. Because newborns with this disorder are missing the protection provided by normal skin, they are at risk of becoming dehydrated and developing infections in the skin or throughout the body (sepsis).

As affected individuals get older, blistering is less frequent, erythroderma becomes less evident, and the skin becomes thick (hyperkeratotic), especially over joints, on areas of skin that come into contact with each other, or on the scalp or neck. This thickened skin is usually darker than normal. Bacteria can grow in the thick skin, often causing a distinct odor.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis can be categorized into two types. People with PS-type epidermolytic hyperkeratosis have thick skin on the palms of their hands and soles of their feet (palmoplantar or palm/sole hyperkeratosis) in addition to other areas of the body. People with the other type, NPS-type, do not have extensive palmoplantar hyperkeratosis but do have hyperkeratosis on other areas of the body.

Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is part of a group of conditions called ichthyoses, which refers to the scaly skin seen in individuals with related disorders. However, in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, the skin is thick but not scaly as in some of the other conditions in the group. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
38179
Concept ID:
C0079153
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...