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1.

Thrombophilia due to thrombin defect

Prothrombin thrombophilia is characterized by venous thromboembolism (VTE) manifest most commonly in adults as deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in the legs or pulmonary embolism. The clinical expression of prothrombin thrombophilia is variable; many individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the 20210G>A F2 variant never develop thrombosis, and while most heterozygotes who develop thrombotic complications remain asymptomatic until adulthood, some have recurrent thromboembolism before age 30 years. The relative risk for DVT in adults heterozygous for the 20210G>A variant is two- to fivefold increased; in children, the relative risk for thrombosis is three- to fourfold increased. Heterozygosity for 20210G>A has at most a modest effect on recurrence risk after a first episode. Although prothrombin thrombophilia may increase the risk for pregnancy loss, its association with preeclampsia and other complications of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction and placental abruption remains controversial. Factors that predispose to thrombosis in prothrombin thrombophilia include: the number of 20210G>A alleles; presence of coexisting genetic abnormalities including factor V Leiden; and acquired thrombophilic disorders (e.g., antiphospholipid antibodies). Circumstantial risk factors for thrombosis include pregnancy and oral contraceptive use. Some evidence suggests that the risk for VTE in 20210G>A heterozygotes increases after air travel. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
463623
Concept ID:
C3160733
Finding
2.

Thrombophilia due to protein C deficiency, autosomal dominant

Heterozygous protein C deficiency is characterized by recurrent venous thrombosis. However, many adults with heterozygous disease may be asymptomatic (Millar et al., 2000). Individuals with decreased amounts of protein C are classically referred to as having type I deficiency and those with normal amounts of a functionally defective protein as having type II deficiency (Bertina et al., 1984). Acquired protein C deficiency is a clinically similar disorder caused by development of an antibody against protein C. Clouse and Comp (1986) reviewed the structural and functional properties of protein C and discussed both hereditary and acquired deficiency of protein C. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
436138
Concept ID:
C2674321
Disease or Syndrome
3.

PGM1-congenital disorder of glycosylation

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type It (CDG1T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and severity. The most common features include cleft lip and bifid uvula, apparent at birth, followed by hepatopathy, intermittent hypoglycemia, short stature, and exercise intolerance, often accompanied by increased serum creatine kinase. Less common features include rhabdomyolysis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (summary by Tegtmeyer et al., 2014). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
414536
Concept ID:
C2752015
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hereditary antithrombin deficiency

Deficiency of antithrombin III is a major risk factor for venous thromboembolic disease. Two categories of AT-III deficiency have been defined on the basis of AT-III antigen levels in the plasma of affected individuals. The majority of AT-III deficiency families belong in the type I (classic) deficiency group and have a quantitatively abnormal phenotype in which antigen and heparin cofactor levels are both reduced to about 50% of normal. The second category of AT-III deficiency has been termed type II (functional) deficiency. Affected individuals from these kindreds produce dysfunctional AT-III molecules; they have reduced heparin cofactor activity levels (about 50% of normal) but levels of AT-III antigen are often normal or nearly normal (summary by Bock and Prochownik, 1987). The 2 categories of antithrombmin III deficiency have been classified further. Type I (low functional and immunologic antithrombin) has been subdivided into subtype Ia (reduced levels of normal antithrombin), and type Ib (reduced levels of antithrombin and the presence of low levels of a variant). Type II (low functional but normal immunologic antithrombin) has been subdivided into subtype IIa (functional abnormalities affecting both the reactive site and the heparin-binding site of AT3); subtype IIb (functional abnormalities limited to the reactive site); and subtype IIc (functional abnormalities limited to the heparin-binding site) (summary by Lane et al., 1992). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75781
Concept ID:
C0272375
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency, autosomal dominant

Heterozygous protein S deficiency, like protein C deficiency (176860), is characterized by recurrent venous thrombosis. Bertina (1990) classified protein S deficiency into 3 clinical subtypes based on laboratory findings. Type I refers to deficiency of both free and total protein S as well as decreased protein S activity; type II shows normal plasma values, but decreased protein S activity; and type III shows decreased free protein S levels and activity, but normal total protein S levels. Approximately 40% of protein S circulates as a free active form, whereas the remaining 60% circulates as an inactive form bound to C4BPA (120830). Zoller et al. (1995) observed coexistence of type I and type III PROS1-deficient phenotypes within a single family and determined that the subtypes are allelic. Under normal conditions, the concentration of protein S exceeds that of C4BPA by approximately 30 to 40%. Thus, free protein S is the molar surplus of protein S over C4BPA. Mild protein S deficiency will thus present with selective deficiency of free protein S, whereas more pronounced protein S deficiency will also decrease the complexed protein S and consequently the total protein S level. These findings explained why assays for free protein S have a higher predictive value for protein S deficiency. See also autosomal recessive thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency (THPH6; 614514), which is a more severe disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
479841
Concept ID:
C3278211
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency, autosomal recessive

Autosomal recessive thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency is a very rare and severe hematologic disorder resulting in thrombosis and secondary hemorrhage usually beginning in early infancy. Some affected individuals develop neonatal purpura fulminans, multifocal thrombosis, or intracranial hemorrhage (Pung-amritt et al., 1999; Fischer et al., 2010), whereas others have recurrent thromboses later in childhood (Comp et al., 1984). See also autosomal dominant thrombophilia due to protein S deficiency (THPH5; 612336), a less severe disorder caused by heterozygous mutation in the PROS1 gene. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482722
Concept ID:
C3281092
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Cerebral venous thrombosis

Formation of a blood clot (thrombus) inside a cerebral vein, causing the obstruction of blood flow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
57743
Concept ID:
C0151945
Disease or Syndrome
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