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1.

Severe combined immunodeficiency, autosomal recessive, T cell-negative, B cell-negative, NK cell-negative, due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a systemic purine metabolic disorder that primarily affects lymphocyte development, viability, and function. The clinical phenotypic spectrum includes: Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), often diagnosed by age six months and usually by age 12 months; Less severe "delayed" onset combined immune deficiency (CID), usually diagnosed between age one and ten years; "Late/adult onset" CID, diagnosed in the second to fourth decades; Benign "partial ADA deficiency" (very low or absent ADA activity in erythrocytes but greater ADA activity in nucleated cells), which is compatible with normal immune function. Infants with typical early-onset ADA-deficient SCID have failure to thrive and opportunistic infections associated with marked depletion of T, B, and NK lymphocytes, and an absence of both humoral and cellular immune function. If immune function is not restored, children with ADA-deficient SCID rarely survive beyond age one to two years. Infections in delayed- and late-onset types (commonly, recurrent otitis, sinusitis, and upper respiratory) may initially be less severe than those in individuals with ADA-deficient SCID; however, by the time of diagnosis these individuals often have chronic pulmonary insufficiency and may have autoimmune phenomena (cytopenias, anti-thyroid antibodies), allergies, and elevated serum concentration of IgE. The longer the disorder goes unrecognized, the more immune function deteriorates and the more likely are chronic sequelae of recurrent infection. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
354935
Concept ID:
C1863236
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome, type 1

Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I (APS1) is characterized by the presence of 2 of 3 major clinical symptoms: Addison disease, and/or hypoparathyroidism, and/or chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (Neufeld et al., 1981). However, variable APS1 phenotypes have been observed, even among sibs. In addition, some patients may exhibit apparent isolated hypoparathyroidism, an early manifestation of APS1 with peak incidence at around age 5 years; over long-term follow-up, the development of additional features of APS1 may be observed (Cranston et al., 2022). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
39125
Concept ID:
C0085859
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 1, autosomal dominant

STAT3 hyper IgE syndrome (STAT3-HIES) is a primary immune deficiency syndrome characterized by elevated serum IgE, eczema, and recurrent skin and respiratory tract infections, together with several nonimmune features. This disorder typically manifests in the newborn period with a rash (often diagnosed as eosinophilic pustulosis) that subsequently evolves into an eczematoid dermatitis. Recurrent staphylococcal skin boils and bacterial pneumonias usually manifest in the first years of life. Pneumatoceles and bronchiectasis often result from aberrant healing of pneumonias. Mucocutaneous candidiasis is common. Nonimmune features may include retained primary teeth, scoliosis, bone fractures following minimal trauma, joint hyperextensibility, and characteristic facial appearance, which typically emerges in adolescence. Vascular abnormalities have been described and include middle-sized artery tortuosity and aneurysms, with infrequent clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal dysmotility, and spontaneous intestinal perforations (some of which are associated with diverticuli). Fungal infections of the GI tract (typically histoplasmosis, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides) also occur infrequently. Survival is typically into adulthood, with most individuals now living into or past the sixth decade. Most deaths are associated with gram-negative (Pseudomonas) or filamentous fungal pneumonias resulting in hemoptysis. Lymphomas occur at an increased frequency. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1648470
Concept ID:
C4721531
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency 1

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of neutrophil function resulting from a deficiency of the beta-2 integrin subunit of the leukocyte cell adhesion molecule. The leukocyte cell adhesion molecule is present on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and granulocytes and mediates cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. LAD is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections; impaired pus formation and wound healing; abnormalities of a wide variety of adhesion-dependent functions of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes; and a lack of beta-2/alpha-L, beta-2/alpha-M, and beta-2/alpha-X expression. Genetic Heterogeneity of Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Also see LAD2 (266265), caused by mutation in the SLC35C1 gene (605881), and LAD3 (612840), caused by mutation in the FERMT3 gene (607901). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
98310
Concept ID:
C0398738
Disease or Syndrome
5.

MHC class II deficiency

A rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by absence of HLA class II molecules on the surface of immune cells, leading to severely impaired cellular and humoral immune response to foreign antigens, severe CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. The disease clinically manifests with early onset of severe and recurrent infections mainly of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, protracted diarrhea with failure to thrive, and autoimmune disease, and is frequently fatal in childhood. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
444051
Concept ID:
C2931418
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Immunodeficiency 104

Immunodeficiency-104 (IMD104) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of recurrent infections in early infancy. Manifestations may include oral thrush, fever, and failure to thrive. Some patients have lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly, whereas others have absence of lymph nodes and lack a thymic shadow. Laboratory studies show decreased or absent numbers of nonfunctional T cells, normal or increased levels of B cells, variable hypogammaglobulinemia, and normal NK cells. The disorder is caused by a defect in IL7 (146660) signaling due to a mutant IL7 receptor. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be curative (Roifman et al., 2000 and Giliani et al., 2005). Giliani et al. (2005) provided a detailed review of IL7R deficiency, including discussion of the IL7R gene and its function in the immune system, clinical features of the disorder, and experiences with hematopoietic stem cell transplant as treatment. For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive SCID, see 601457. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1801019
Concept ID:
C5676890
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Vici syndrome

With the current widespread use of multigene panels and comprehensive genomic testing, it has become apparent that the phenotypic spectrum of EPG5-related disorder represents a continuum. At the most severe end of the spectrum is classic Vici syndrome (defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystem involvement characterized by the combination of agenesis of the corpus callosum, cataracts, hypopigmentation, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and failure to thrive); at the milder end of the spectrum are attenuated neurodevelopmental phenotypes with variable multisystem involvement. Median survival in classic Vici syndrome appears to be 24 months, with only 10% of children surviving longer than age five years; the most common causes of death are respiratory infections as a result of primary immunodeficiency and/or cardiac insufficiency resulting from progressive cardiac failure. No data are available on life span in individuals at the milder end of the spectrum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
340962
Concept ID:
C1855772
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Immunodeficiency 23

IMD23 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by onset of recurrent infections, usually respiratory or cutaneous, in early childhood. Immune workup usually shows neutropenia, lymphopenia, eosinophilia, and increased serum IgE or IgA. Neutrophil chemotactic defects have also been reported. Infectious agents include bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Many patients develop atopic dermatitis, eczema, and other signs of autoinflammation. Affected individuals may also show developmental delay or cognitive impairment of varying severity (summary by Bjorksten and Lundmark, 1976 and Zhang et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
862808
Concept ID:
C4014371
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Autoimmune enteropathy and endocrinopathy - susceptibility to chronic infections syndrome

IMD31C is a disorder of immunologic dysregulation with highly variable manifestations resulting from autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in STAT1 (600555). Most patients present in infancy or early childhood with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). Other highly variable features include recurrent bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycoplasmal infections, disseminated dimorphic fungal infections, enteropathy with villous atrophy, and autoimmune disorders, such as hypothyroidism or diabetes mellitus. A subset of patients show apparently nonimmunologic features, including osteopenia, delayed puberty, and intracranial aneurysms. Laboratory studies show increased activation of gamma-interferon (IFNG; 147570)-mediated inflammation (summary by Uzel et al., 2013 and Sampaio et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
481620
Concept ID:
C3279990
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Combined immunodeficiency due to STK4 deficiency

Immunodeficiency-110 (IMD110) is an autosomal recessive primary T-cell immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by progressive loss of naive T cells, recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, warts, and abscesses, and autoimmune manifestations. Patients are at risk for developing lymphoproliferative disorders or lymphoma, particularly associated with EBV. Some patients may show cardiac malformations, including atrial septal defect (Abdollahpour et al., 2012; Nehme et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766857
Concept ID:
C3553943
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Immunodeficiency 51

Immunodeficiency-51 (IMD51) is an autosomal recessive primary immune deficiency that is usually characterized by onset of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in the first years of life. Most patients also show recurrent Staphylococcal skin infections, and may show increased susceptibility to chronic bacterial respiratory infections. Patient cells show a lack of cellular responses to stimulation with certain IL17 isoforms, including IL17A (603149), IL17F (606496), IL17A/F, and IL17E (IL25; 605658) (summary by Levy et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934770
Concept ID:
C4310803
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Severe combined immunodeficiency due to CARMIL2 deficiency

Immunodeficiency-58 is an autosomal recessive primary immunologic disorder characterized by early-onset skin lesions, including eczematous dermatitis, infectious abscesses, and warts, recurrent respiratory infections or allergies, and chronic persistent infections with candida, Molluscum contagiosum, mycobacteria, EBV, bacteria, and viruses. Some patients may have gastrointestinal involvement, including inflammatory bowel disease, EBV+ smooth muscle tumors, and esophagitis. Immunologic analysis shows defective T-cell function with decreased Treg cells and deficient CD3/CD28 costimulation responses in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. B-cell function may also be impaired (summary by Wang et al., 2016 and Alazami et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648422
Concept ID:
C4748304
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Candidiasis, familial, 6

Any familial chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the IL17F gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
462755
Concept ID:
C3151405
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome, type 2

Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type II (APS2), or Schmidt syndrome, is characterized by the presence of autoimmune Addison disease in association with either autoimmune thyroid disease or type I diabetes mellitus, or both. Chronic candidiasis is not present. APS2 may occur at any age and in both sexes, but is most common in middle-aged females and is very rare in childhood (summary by Betterle et al., 2004). See 240300 for a phenotypic description of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS1). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
39126
Concept ID:
C0085860
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Immunodeficiency 15a

Immunodeficiency 15A (IMD15A) is an autosomal dominant primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by relatively late onset of recurrent respiratory tract infections and lymphopenia, combined with immune activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. One patient presented with inflammatory disease and possible ectodermal defect. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648385
Concept ID:
C4748694
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hyper-IgE recurrent infection syndrome 3, autosomal recessive

Hyper-IgE syndrome-3 with recurrent infections (HIES3) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by childhood onset of atopic dermatitis, skin infections particularly with Staphylococcus aureus, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and increased serum IgE and IgG. Patients are susceptible to bacterial and fungal infections, including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Immunologic workup shows impaired differentiation of CD4+ T cells into T-helper 17 cells, decreased memory B cells, and often decreased NK cells (summary by Beziat et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hyper-IgE syndrome, see HIES1 (147060). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648483
Concept ID:
C4748969
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia

Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD) is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by onset in infancy of a panepithelial defect involving the oral, nasal, conjunctival, vaginal, cervical, perineal, urethral, and bladder mucosa. Patients develop cataracts, blindness, nonscarring alopecia, perineal psoriasiform lesions, and follicular keratoses (Witkop et al., 1982). Although 1 family was reported to have progressive severe interstitial lung disease (Witkop et al., 1979), this feature has not been reported in other families and is not considered a criterion for diagnosis. However, the clinical triad of nonscarring alopecia, well-demarcated fiery red mucosa, and psoriasiform perineal involvement has been consistently observed (review by Boralevi et al., 2005). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
220887
Concept ID:
C1274795
Congenital Abnormality
18.

Candidiasis, familial, 9

Any chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the IL17RC gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
906897
Concept ID:
C4225324
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Candidiasis, familial, 1

Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) includes a group of rare disorders with altered immune responses, selective against Candida, characterized by persistent and/or recurrent infections of the skin, nails, and mucous membranes, caused by organisms of the genus Candida, mainly Candida albicans (Zuccarello et al., 2002). Isolated familial chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is distinct from candidiasis with endocrinopathy (240300). In myeloperoxidase deficiency (254600), susceptibility to candidiasis may be increased. Genetic Heterogeneity of Candidiasis Familial candidiasis-1 (CANDF1) maps to chromosome 2p. CANDF2 (212050) is caused by mutation in the CARD9 gene (607212) on chromosome 9q34.3. CANDF3 (607644), a form restricted to nails of the hands and feet, maps to chromosome 11. CANDF4 (613108) is caused by mutation in the CLEC7A gene (606264) on chromosome 12p13. CANDF6 (613956) is caused by mutation in the IL17F gene (606496) on chromosome 6p12. CANDF7 (614162) is caused by mutation in the STAT1 gene (600555) on chromosome 2q32. CANDF8 (615527) is caused by mutation in the TRAF3IP2 gene (607043) on chromosome 6q21. CANDF9 (616445) is caused by mutation in the IL17RC gene (610925) on chromosome 3p25. A form of familial candidiasis, previously thought to be isolated and designated CANDF5, has been found to be part of a primary immune deficiency (IMD51; 613953) that includes Staphylococcal skin infections and increased susceptibility to chronic bacterial respiratory infections. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
414015
Concept ID:
C2751429
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Immunodeficiency 112

Immunodeficiency-112 (IMD112) is an autosomal recessive primary immunologic disorder with variable manifestations beginning in early childhood. Some patients have recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, including disseminated bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-related infections, whereas at least 1 patient only presented with BCG-related infections. Immunologic workup shows variable abnormalities affecting lymphoid immunity, including hypogammaglobulinemia, lymphopenia or paradoxical lymphocytosis, and defects in B, T, and NK cell differentiation and function mainly due to disruption of the noncanonical NFKB (see 164011) signaling pathway (Willmann et al., 2014; Schlechter et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1841269
Concept ID:
C5830633
Disease or Syndrome
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