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1.

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is characterized by the association of gastrointestinal (GI) polyposis, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and cancer predisposition. PJS-type hamartomatous polyps are most common in the small intestine (in order of prevalence: jejunum, ileum, and duodenum) but can also occur in the stomach, large bowel, and extraintestinal sites including the renal pelvis, bronchus, gall bladder, nasal passages, urinary bladder, and ureters. GI polyps can result in chronic bleeding, anemia, and recurrent obstruction and intussusception requiring repeated laparotomy and bowel resection. Mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation presents in childhood as dark blue to dark brown macules around the mouth, eyes, and nostrils, in the perianal area, and on the buccal mucosa. Hyperpigmented macules on the fingers are common. The macules may fade in puberty and adulthood. Recognition of the distinctive skin manifestations is important especially in individuals who have PJS as the result of a de novo pathogenic variant as these skin findings often predate GI signs and symptoms. Individuals with PJS are at increased risk for a wide variety of epithelial malignancies (colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, breast, and ovarian cancers). Females are at risk for sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTAT), a benign neoplasm of the ovaries, and adenoma malignum of the cervix, a rare aggressive cancer. Males occasionally develop large calcifying Sertoli cell tumors of the testes, which secrete estrogen and can lead to gynecomastia, advanced skeletal age, and ultimately short stature, if untreated. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18404
Concept ID:
C0031269
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Telangiectasia, hereditary hemorrhagic, type 1

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are characteristically found on the lips, tongue, buccal and gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, face, and fingers. The appearance of telangiectases is generally later than epistaxis but may be during childhood. Large AVMs occur most often in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. A minority of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which is rarely seen before age 50 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1643786
Concept ID:
C4551861
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Juvenile polyposis syndrome

Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is characterized by predisposition to hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, specifically in the stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The term "juvenile" refers to the type of polyp rather than to the age of onset of polyps. Most individuals with JPS have some polyps by age 20 years; some may have only four or five polyps over their lifetime, whereas others in the same family may have more than 100. If the polyps are left untreated, they may cause bleeding and anemia. Most juvenile polyps are benign; however, malignant transformation can occur. Risk for GI cancers ranges from 11% to 86%. Most of this increased risk is attributed to colon cancer, but cancers of the stomach, upper GI tract, and pancreas have also been reported. A combined syndrome of JPS and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is present in most individuals with an SMAD4 pathogenic variant. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87518
Concept ID:
C0345893
Neoplastic Process
4.

Telangiectasia, hereditary hemorrhagic, type 2

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are characteristically found on the lips, tongue, buccal and gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, face, and fingers. The appearance of telangiectases is generally later than epistaxis but may be during childhood. Large AVMs occur most often in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. A minority of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which is rarely seen before age 50 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
324960
Concept ID:
C1838163
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Sarcoidosis, susceptibility to, 1

Any sarcoidosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the HLA-DRB1 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
394568
Concept ID:
C2697310
Finding
6.

Juvenile polyposis/hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome

Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) that lack intervening capillaries and result in direct connections between arteries and veins. The most common clinical manifestation is spontaneous and recurrent nosebleeds (epistaxis) beginning on average at age 12 years. Telangiectases (small AVMs) are characteristically found on the lips, tongue, buccal and gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa, face, and fingers. The appearance of telangiectases is generally later than epistaxis but may be during childhood. Large AVMs occur most often in the lungs, liver, or brain; complications from bleeding or shunting may be sudden and catastrophic. A minority of individuals with HHT have GI bleeding, which is rarely seen before age 50 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
331400
Concept ID:
C1832942
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Atelosteogenesis type I

The FLNB disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild to severe. At the mild end are spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) syndrome and Larsen syndrome; at the severe end are the phenotypic continuum of atelosteogenesis types I (AOI) and III (AOIII) and Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD). SCT syndrome is characterized by postnatal disproportionate short stature, scoliosis and lordosis, clubfeet, hearing loss, dental enamel hypoplasia, carpal and tarsal synostosis, and vertebral fusions. Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; clubfeet (equinovarus or equinovalgus foot deformities); scoliosis and cervical kyphosis, which can be associated with a cervical myelopathy; short, broad, spatulate distal phalanges; distinctive craniofacies (prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge, malar flattening, and widely spaced eyes); vertebral anomalies; and supernumerary carpal and tarsal bone ossification centers. Individuals with SCT syndrome and Larsen syndrome can have midline cleft palate and hearing loss. AOI and AOIII are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and clubfeet. AOI is lethal in the perinatal period. In individuals with AOIII, survival beyond the neonatal period is possible with intensive and invasive respiratory support. Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD) is a perinatal-lethal micromelic dwarfism characterized by flipper-like limbs (polysyndactyly with complete syndactyly of all fingers and toes, hypoplastic or absent first digits, and duplicated intermediate and distal phalanges), macrobrachycephaly, prominant forehead, hypertelorism, and exophthalmos. Occasional features include cleft palate, omphalocele, and cardiac and genitourinary anomalies. The radiographic features at mid-gestation are characteristic. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82701
Concept ID:
C0265283
Congenital Abnormality
8.

Pitt-Hopkins syndrome

Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS) is characterized by significant developmental delays with moderate-to-severe intellectual disability and behavioral differences, characteristic facial features, and episodic hyperventilation and/or breath-holding while awake. Speech is significantly delayed and most individuals are nonverbal with receptive language often stronger than expressive language. Other common findings are autism spectrum disorder symptoms, sleep disturbance, stereotypic hand movements, seizures, constipation, and severe myopia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
370910
Concept ID:
C1970431
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Surfactant metabolism dysfunction, pulmonary, 1

Inborn errors of pulmonary surfactant metabolism are genetically heterogeneous disorders resulting in severe respiratory insufficiency or failure in full-term neonates or infants. These disorders are associated with various pathologic entities, including pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), desquamative interstitial pneumonitis (DIP), or cellular nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP) (Clark and Clark, 2005). A clinically similar disorder characterized by respiratory distress (267450) can affect preterm infants, who show developmental deficiency of surfactant. Acquired PAP (610910) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the presence of autoantibodies to CSF2 (138960). Genetic Heterogeneity of Pulmonary Surfactant Metabolism Dysfunction See also SMDP2 (610913), caused by mutation in the SPTPC gene (178620) on 8p21; SMDP3 (610921), caused by mutation in the ABCA3 gene (601615) on 16p13; SMDP4 (300770), caused by mutation in the CSF2RA gene (306250) on Xp22; and SMDP5 (614370), caused by mutation in the CSF2RB gene (138981) on 22q12. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
368844
Concept ID:
C1968602
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 4A

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) encompasses several forms of nonsyndromic ichthyosis. Although most neonates with ARCI are collodion babies, the clinical presentation and severity of ARCI may vary significantly, ranging from harlequin ichthyosis, the most severe and often fatal form, to lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and (nonbullous) congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (CIE). These phenotypes are now recognized to fall on a continuum; however, the phenotypic descriptions are clinically useful for clarification of prognosis and management. Infants with harlequin ichthyosis are usually born prematurely and are encased in thick, hard, armor-like plates of cornified skin that severely restrict movement. Life-threatening complications in the immediate postnatal period include respiratory distress, feeding problems, and systemic infection. Collodion babies are born with a taut, shiny, translucent or opaque membrane that encases the entire body and lasts for days to weeks. LI and CIE are seemingly distinct phenotypes: classic, severe LI with dark brown, plate-like scale with no erythroderma and CIE with finer whiter scale and underlying generalized redness of the skin. Affected individuals with severe involvement can have ectropion, eclabium, scarring alopecia involving the scalp and eyebrows, and palmar and plantar keratoderma. Besides these major forms of nonsyndromic ichthyosis, a few rare subtypes have been recognized, such as bathing suit ichthyosis, self-improving collodion ichthyosis, or ichthyosis-prematurity syndrome. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
371355
Concept ID:
C1832550
Congenital Abnormality
11.

Surfactant metabolism dysfunction, pulmonary, 2

Pulmonary surfactant metabolism dysfunction-2 (SMDP2) is a rare autosomal dominant disease associated with progressive respiratory insufficiency and lung disease with a variable clinical course. The pathophysiology of the disorder is postulated to involve intracellular accumulation of a structurally defective SPC protein (Thomas et al., 2002). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of pulmonary surfactant metabolism dysfunction, see SMDP1 (265120). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
410078
Concept ID:
C1970470
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Sarcoidosis, susceptibility to, 2

Any sarcoidosis in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the BTNL2 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
436694
Concept ID:
C2676468
Finding
13.

Interstitial lung disease due to ABCA3 deficiency

For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of pulmonary surfactant metabolism dysfunction, see SMDP1 (265120). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
410074
Concept ID:
C1970456
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, primary, autosomal recessive, 1

Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy-1 (PHOAR1) is a rare familial disorder characterized by digital clubbing, osteoarthropathy, and acroosteolysis, with variable features of pachydermia, delayed closure of the fontanels, and congenital heart disease (summary by Uppal et al., 2008; Radhakrishnan et al., 2020). Secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, or pulmonary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, is a different disorder characterized by digital clubbing secondary to acquired diseases, most commonly intrathoracic neoplasm (Uppal et al., 2008). Touraine et al. (1935) recognized pachydermoperiostosis as a familial disorder with 3 clinical presentations or forms: a complete form characterized by periostosis and pachydermia; an incomplete form with bone changes but without pachydermia; and a 'forme fruste' with pachydermia and minimal skeletal changes. Genetic Heterogeneity Autosomal recessive primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy-2-enteropathy syndrome (PHOAR2E; 614441) is caused by mutation in the SLCO2A1 gene (601460) on chromosome 3q22. Families with an autosomal dominant form of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, in which patients may also experience gastrointestinal symptoms, have been reported (PHOAD; 167100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1641972
Concept ID:
C4551679
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome 1

Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bowing of the long bones and other skeletal anomalies, episodic hyperthermia, respiratory distress, and feeding difficulties usually resulting in early death (Dagoneau et al., 2004). See also 'classic' Schwartz-Jampel syndrome type 1 (SJS1; 255800), a phenotypically similar but genetically distinct disorder caused by mutation in the HSPG2 gene (142461) on chromosome 1p36. Genetic Heterogeneity of Stuve-Wiedemann Syndrome Stuve-Wiedemann syndrome-2 (STWS2; 619751) is caused by mutation in the IL6ST gene (600694) on chromosome 5q11. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1803541
Concept ID:
C5676888
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Severe early-onset pulmonary alveolar proteinosis due to MARS deficiency

Interstitial lung and liver disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of respiratory insufficiency and progressive liver disease in infancy or early childhood. Pathologic examination of lung lavage is consistent with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (summary by Hadchouel et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
895551
Concept ID:
C4225400
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Meier-Gorlin syndrome 7

Any Meier-Gorlin syndrome in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the CDC45 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
934705
Concept ID:
C4310738
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, primary, autosomal recessive, 2

PHOAR2-enteropathy syndrome (PHOAR2E) is characterized by primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) and/or chronic nonspecific ulcers (CNSU) of the small intestine. The cardinal features of PHO are digital clubbing, pachydermia, and periostosis; other manifestations include swelling and pain of the large joints, hyperhidrosis, seborrhea, and acne. CNSU often presents with chronic unexplained anemia and abdominal pain, and patients may exhibit edema due to hypoalbuminemia. Radiologic imaging or endoscopy shows multiple small ulcers, predominantly in the ileum, although the stomach, duodenum, and jejunum are often involved. PHO is more frequent and more severe in male patients, who often also report watery diarrhea, whereas CNSU is more often diagnosed in female patients, who may also show features of PHO such as digital clubbing or arthralgias and swelling of the joints. The same mutations in the SLCO2A1 gene have been reported in patients presenting with either diagnosis, and presumed sex-related modifiers of the manifestations of disease or other genotype/phenotype correlates have yet to be elucidated (Li et al., 2017; Umeno et al., 2018; Hong et al., 2022; Kimball et al., 2024). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PHO, see PHOAR1 (259100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482430
Concept ID:
C3280800
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Adermatoglyphia

Isolated congenital adermatoglyphia is a rare, genetic developmental defect during embryogenesis disorder characterized by the lack of epidermal ridges on the palms and soles, resulting in the absence of fingerprints, with no other associated manifestations. It is associated with a reduced number of sweat gland openings and reduced transpiration of palms and soles. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
338875
Concept ID:
C1852150
Finding
20.

X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder

X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder shows more severe manifestations in hemizygous males compared to heterozygous females. Affected males have early onset of recurrent respiratory infections and failure to thrive resulting from inflammatory gastroenteritis or colitis. Patients also show reticular pigmentation abnormalities of the skin and may develop corneal scarring. Carrier females may be unaffected or have only pigmentary abnormalities along the lines of Blaschko (summary by Starokadomskyy et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
336844
Concept ID:
C1845050
Disease or Syndrome
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