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Items: 6

1.

Thrombocytopenia 1

The WAS-related disorders, which include Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT), and X-linked congenital neutropenia (XLN), are a spectrum of disorders of hematopoietic cells, with predominant defects of platelets and lymphocytes caused by pathogenic variants in WAS. WAS-related disorders usually present in infancy. Affected males have thrombocytopenia with intermittent mucosal bleeding, bloody diarrhea, and intermittent or chronic petechiae and purpura; eczema; and recurrent bacterial and viral infections, particularly of the ear. At least 40% of those who survive the early complications develop one or more autoimmune conditions including hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, immune-mediated neutropenia, rheumatoid arthritis, vasculitis, and immune-mediated damage to the kidneys and liver. Individuals with a WAS-related disorder, particularly those who have been exposed to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are at increased risk of developing lymphomas, which often occur in unusual, extranodal locations including the brain, lung, or gastrointestinal tract. Males with XLT have thrombocytopenia with small platelets; other complications of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, including eczema and immune dysfunction, are usually mild or absent. Males with XLN have congenital neutropenia, myeloid dysplasia, and lymphoid cell abnormalities. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
326416
Concept ID:
C1839163
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Thrombocytopenia, X-linked, with or without dyserythropoietic anemia

GATA1-related cytopenia is characterized by thrombocytopenia and/or anemia ranging from mild to severe. One or more of the following may also be present: platelet dysfunction, mild ß-thalassemia, neutropenia, and congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) in males. Thrombocytopenia typically presents in infancy as a bleeding disorder with easy bruising and mucosal bleeding (e.g., epistaxis). Anemia ranges from minimal (mild dyserythropoiesis) to severe (hydrops fetalis requiring in utero transfusion). At the extreme end of the clinical spectrum, severe hemorrhage and/or erythrocyte transfusion dependence are life long; at the milder end, anemia and the risk for bleeding may decrease spontaneously with age. Heterozygous females may have mild-to-moderate symptoms such as menorrhagia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
763703
Concept ID:
C3550789
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia 1

Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (RUSAT) is characterized by thrombocytopenia that progresses to pancytopenia, in association with congenital proximal fusion of the radius and ulna that results in extremely limited pronation and supination of the forearm (summary by Niihori et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Radioulnar Synostosis with Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia-2 (RUSAT2; 616738) is caused by heterozygous mutation in the MECOM gene (165215) on chromosome 3q26. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1637913
Concept ID:
C4551975
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia 2

Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (RUSAT) is characterized by thrombocytopenia that progresses to pancytopenia, in association with congenital proximal fusion of the radius and ulna that results in extremely limited pronation and supination of the forearm (summary by Niihori et al., 2015). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, see RUSAT1 (605432). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
901732
Concept ID:
C4225221
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Pseudo-TORCH syndrome 3

Pseudo-TORCH syndrome-3 (PTORCH3) is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation and neuroinflammation apparent from early infancy. Affected individuals have developmental delay with acute episodes of fever and multisystemic organ involvement, including coagulopathy, elevated liver enzymes, and proteinuria, often associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Brain imaging shows progressive intracranial calcifications, white matter abnormalities, and sometimes cerebral or cerebellar atrophy. Laboratory studies show abnormal elevation of interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) transcripts consistent with a type I interferonopathy. The phenotype resembles the sequelae of intrauterine infection, but there is usually no evidence of an infectious agent. The disorder results from defects in negative regulation of the interferon immunologic pathway. Death in early childhood is common (summary by Duncan et al., 2019 and Gruber et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PTORCH, see PTORCH1 (251290). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1708513
Concept ID:
C5394391
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Congenital thrombocytopenia

Thrombocytopenia with congenital onset. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
124422
Concept ID:
C0272278
Disease or Syndrome
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