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1.

Acrocephalosyndactyly type I

Apert syndrome is characterized by the presence of multisuture craniosynostosis, midface retrusion, and syndactyly of the hands with fusion of the second through fourth nails. Almost all affected individuals have coronal craniosynostosis, and a majority also have involvement of the sagittal and lambdoid sutures. The midface in Apert syndrome is underdeveloped as well as retruded; a subset of affected individuals have cleft palate. The hand in Apert syndrome always includes fusion of the middle three digits; the thumb and fifth finger are sometimes also involved. Feeding issues, dental abnormalities, hearing loss, hyperhidrosis, and progressive synostosis of multiple bones (skull, hands, feet, carpus, tarsus, and cervical vertebrae) are also common. Multilevel airway obstruction may be present and can be due to narrowing of the nasal passages, tongue-based airway obstruction, and/or tracheal anomalies. Nonprogressive ventriculomegaly is present in a majority of individuals, with a small subset having true hydrocephalus. Most individuals with Apert syndrome have normal intelligence or mild intellectual disability; moderate-to-severe intellectual disability has been reported in some individuals. A minority of affected individuals have structural cardiac abnormalities, true gastrointestinal malformations, and anomalies of the genitourinary tract. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
7858
Concept ID:
C0001193
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Timothy syndrome

The first identified CACNA1C-related disorder, referred to as Timothy syndrome, consists of the combination of prolonged QT interval, autism, and cardiovascular malformation with syndactyly of the fingers and toes. Infrequent findings also include developmental and speech delay, seizures, and recurrent infections. With increased availability of molecular genetic testing, a wider spectrum of pathogenic variants and clinical findings associated with CACNA1C-related disorders has been recognized. Because CACNA1C is associated with calcium channel function, all individuals with a pathogenic variant in this gene are at risk for cardiac arrhythmia of a specific type. The clinical manifestations of a CACNA1C-related disorder include three phenotypes: Timothy syndrome with or without syndactyly. QT prolongation (QTc >480 ms) and arrhythmias in the absence of other syndromic features. Short QT syndrome (QTc <350 ms) or Brugada syndrome with short QT interval. These three phenotypes can be separated into two broad categories on the basis of the functional consequences of the pathogenic variants in CACNA1C: QT prolongation with or without a Timothy syndrome-associated phenotype associated with pathogenic variants inducing a gain of function at the cellular level (i.e., increased calcium current). Short QT interval with or without Brugada syndrome EKG pattern associated with pathogenic variants causing loss of function (i.e., reduced calcium current). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
331395
Concept ID:
C1832916
Disease or Syndrome
3.

KBG syndrome

KBG syndrome is typically characterized by macrodontia (especially of the upper central incisors), characteristic facial features (triangular face, brachycephaly, synophrys, widely spaced eyes, broad or bushy eyebrows, prominent ears, prominent nasal bridge, bulbous nose, anteverted nares, long philtrum, and thin vermilion of the upper lip), short stature, developmental delay / intellectual disability, and behavioral issues. Affected individuals may have feeding difficulties (particularly in infancy), skeletal anomalies (brachydactyly, large anterior fontanelle with delayed closure, scoliosis), hearing loss (conductive, mixed, and sensorineural), seizure disorder, and brain malformations. There is significant variability in the clinical findings, even between affected members of the same family. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
66317
Concept ID:
C0220687
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Yunis-Varon syndrome

Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS) is a severe autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal defects, including cleidocranial dysplasia and digital anomalies, and severe neurologic involvement with neuronal loss. Enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles are found in neurons, muscle, and cartilage. The disorder is usually lethal in infancy (summary by Campeau et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
341818
Concept ID:
C1857663
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Blepharocheilodontic syndrome 1

The blepharocheilodontic syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by lower eyelid ectropion, upper eyelid distichiasis, euryblepharon, bilateral cleft lip and palate, and conical teeth. An additional rare manifestation is imperforate anus (summary by Weaver et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1632198
Concept ID:
C4551988
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Desbuquois dysplasia 2

Desbuquois dysplasia, which belongs to the multiple dislocation group of disorders, is characterized by dislocations of large joints, severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation, joint laxity, and flat face with prominent eyes. Radiologic features include short long bones with an exaggerated trochanter that gives a 'monkey wrench' appearance to the proximal femur, and advanced carpal and tarsal ossification (summary by Bui et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Desbuquois dysplasia, see DBQD1 (251450). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
862731
Concept ID:
C4014294
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Fraser syndrome 3

Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fraser syndrome, see 219000. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1621907
Concept ID:
C4540040
Disease or Syndrome
8.

TARP syndrome

The classic features of TARP syndrome are talipes equinovarus, atrial septal defect, Robin sequence (micrognathia, cleft palate, and glossoptosis), and persistent left superior vena cava. Not all patients have all classic features. Some patients have the additional features of central nervous system dysfunction, renal abnormalities, variable cardiac anomalies including hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, and variable distal limb defects including syndactyly. Most patients die in late prenatal or early postnatal stages (summary by Kaeppler et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333324
Concept ID:
C1839463
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Fraser syndrome 2

Fraser syndrome is an autosomal recessive malformation disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and abnormalities of the respiratory and urogenital tract (summary by van Haelst et al., 2008). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fraser syndrome, see 219000. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1624349
Concept ID:
C4540036
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Filippi syndrome

Filippi syndrome is characterized by short stature, microcephaly, syndactyly, intellectual disability, and facial dysmorphism consisting of bulging forehead, broad and prominent nasal bridge, and diminished alar flare. Common features include cryptorchidism, speech impairment, and clinodactyly of the fifth finger, Some patients exhibit visual disturbances, polydactyly, seizures, and/or ectodermal abnormalities, such as nail hypoplasia, long eyelashes, hirsutism, and microdontia (summary by Hussain et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
163197
Concept ID:
C0795940
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Cardiac malformation, cleft lip/palate, microcephaly, and digital anomalies

MedGen UID:
318752
Concept ID:
C1832950
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Syndactyly type 1

A distal limb malformation with manifestation of complete or partial webbing between the third and fourth fingers and/or the second and third toes. Other digits may be involved occasionally. The phenotype varies widely within and between families, sometimes only the hands are affected and sometimes only the feet. Webbing between fingers may be associated with bony fusion of the distal phalanges. Inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
348343
Concept ID:
C1861380
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Camptosynpolydactyly, complex

MedGen UID:
375276
Concept ID:
C1843758
Congenital Abnormality
14.

Multinucleated neurons-anhydramnios-renal dysplasia-cerebellar hypoplasia-hydranencephaly syndrome

MARCH is an autosomal recessive lethal congenital disorder characterized by severe hydranencephaly with almost complete absence of the cerebral hemispheres, which are replaced by fluid, relative preservation of the posterior fossa structures, and renal dysplasia or agenesis. Affected fetuses either die in utero or shortly after birth, and show arthrogryposis and features consistent with anhydramnios. Histologic examination of residual brain tissue shows multinucleated neurons resulting from impaired cytokinesis (summary by Frosk et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
343465
Concept ID:
C1856053
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Alkuraya-Kucinskas syndrome

ALKKUCS is an autosomal recessive severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by arthrogryposis, brain abnormalities associated with cerebral parenchymal underdevelopment, and global developmental delay. Most affected individuals die in utero or soon after birth. Additional abnormalities may include hypotonia, dysmorphic facial features, and involvement of other organ systems, such as cardiac or renal. The few patients who survive have variable intellectual disability and may have seizures (summary by Gueneau et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1634304
Concept ID:
C4693347
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Blepharocheilodontic syndrome 2

Blepharocheilodontic (BCD) syndrome is a disorder that is present at birth. It mainly affects the eyelids (blepharo-), upper lip (-cheilo-), and teeth (-dontic).

People with BCD syndrome have lower eyelids that turn out so that the inner surface is exposed (ectropion). The outside of the lower lid may sag away from the eye (euryblepharon), and the eyelids may not be able to close completely (lagophthalmia). There can be extra eyelashes (distichiasis) on the upper eyelids, ranging from a few extra eyelashes to a full extra set. These eyelashes do not grow along the edge of the eyelid with the normal lashes, but out of its inner lining. When the abnormal eyelashes touch the eyeball, they can cause damage to the clear covering of the eye (cornea). Affected individuals may also have widely spaced eyes (hypertelorism), a flat face, and a high forehead.

Other features of BCD syndrome usually include openings on both sides of the upper lip (bilateral cleft lip) and an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate). Affected individuals may have fewer teeth than normal (oligodontia) and their teeth are often smaller than usual and cone-shaped. The dental abnormalities affect both primary teeth (sometimes called "baby teeth") and secondary (permanent) teeth. Other frequent features include sparse, fine hair and abnormal nails.

Occasionally people with BCD syndrome have additional features, including an obstruction of the anal opening (imperforate anus); malformation or absence of the butterfly-shaped gland in the lower neck called the thyroid, resulting in lack of thyroid gland function; or fused fingers or toes (syndactyly). Very rarely, affected individuals have incompletely formed arms or legs (limb reduction defects) or a spinal cord abnormality known as spina bifida. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
1623594
Concept ID:
C4540127
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Chromosome 13q33-q34 deletion syndrome

Chromosome 13q33-q34 deletion syndrome is associated with developmental delay and/or impaired intellectual development, facial dysmorphism, and an increased risk for epilepsy, cardiac defects and additional anatomic anomalies (summary by Sagi-Dain et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1744234
Concept ID:
C5436890
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, language delay, and skeletal defects with or without seizures

Neurodevelopmental disorder with hypotonia, language delay, and skeletal defects with or without seizures (NEDHLSS) is characterized by global developmental delay apparent from infancy. Affected individuals show severe hypotonia with delayed walking or inability to walk, poor or absent speech, and impaired intellectual development with behavioral abnormalities. Most patients have early-onset seizures, mild skeletal defects that are usually distal, and nonspecific dysmorphic features. More severely affected individuals have additional congenital abnormalities; however, cardiac involvement is rare (summary by Rodan et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1823986
Concept ID:
C5774213
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Intellectual developmental disorder with cardiac defects and dysmorphic facies

IDDCDF is an autosomal recessive syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by globally impaired development with intellectual disability and speech delay, congenital cardiac malformations, and dysmorphic facial features. Additional features, such as distal skeletal anomalies, may also be observed (Stephen et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1675627
Concept ID:
C5193024
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 71, with behavioral abnormalities

Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-71 with behavioral abnormalities (MRD71) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay with hypotonia, speech delay, and variably impaired cognitive development. Almost all affected individuals show marked behavioral manifestations, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), ADHD, hypersensitivity, and aggression. Many have dysmorphic features, although there is not a common gestalt (Harris et al., 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1841073
Concept ID:
C5830437
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
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