U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 7

1.

Familial isolated deficiency of vitamin E

Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) generally manifests in late childhood or early teens between ages five and 15 years. The first symptoms include progressive ataxia, clumsiness of the hands, loss of proprioception, and areflexia. Other features often observed are dysdiadochokinesia, dysarthria, positive Romberg sign, head titubation, decreased visual acuity, and positive Babinski sign. The phenotype and disease severity vary widely among families with different pathogenic variants; age of onset and disease course are more uniform within a given family, but symptoms and disease severity can vary even among sibs. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
341248
Concept ID:
C1848533
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia 1

Individuals with biallelic APOB-related familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (APOB-FHBL) may present from infancy through to adulthood with a range of clinical symptoms including deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins and gastrointestinal and neurologic dysfunction. Affected individuals typically have plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and apo B levels below the fifth centile for age and sex. Acanthocytosis, elevated liver enzymes, and hyperbilirubinemia may also be found. The most common clinical findings are hepatomegaly, steatorrhea, and failure to thrive / growth deficiency. In the absence of treatment, affected individuals can develop atypical pigmentation of the retina; progressive loss of deep tendon reflexes, vibratory sense, and proprioception; muscle pain or weakness; dysarthria; ataxia; tremors; and steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and rarely, cirrhosis of the liver. Individuals with a heterozygous, typically truncating pathogenic variant in APOB are usually asymptomatic with mild liver dysfunction and hepatic steatosis. However, about 5%-10% of individuals with heterozygous APOB-FHBL develop relatively more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis requiring medical attention and occasionally progressing to cirrhosis, albeit very rarely. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1639219
Concept ID:
C4551990
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Congenital bile acid synthesis defect 4

Congenital bile acid synthesis defect type 4 (BAS defect type 4) is an anomaly of bile acid synthesis (see this term) characterized by mild cholestatic liver disease, fat malabsorption and/or neurological disease. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
388039
Concept ID:
C1858328
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Bone marrow failure syndrome 3

Bone marrow failure syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by onset of pancytopenia in early childhood. Patients may have additional variable nonspecific somatic abnormalities, including poor growth, microcephaly, and skin anomalies (summary by Tummala et al., 2016). BMFS3 has a distinct phenotype and may include features that overlap with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS1; 260400), such as pancreatic insufficiency and short stature, and with dyskeratosis congenita (see, e.g., DKCA1, 127550), such as dental and hair abnormalities and shortened telomeres. In addition, some patients may have joint and skeletal abnormalities, impaired development, and retinal dysplasia (summary by D'Amours et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BMFS, see BMFS1 (614675). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934711
Concept ID:
C4310744
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Bile acid malabsorption, primary, 2

Primary bile acid malabsorption-2 (PBAM2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by chronic diarrhea, severe fat-soluble vitamin deficiency, and features of cholestatic liver disease (Sultan et al., 2018). For discussion of genetic heterogeneity of primary bile acid malabsorption, see PBAM1 (613291). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794172
Concept ID:
C5561962
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Liver disease, severe congenital

Severe congenital liver disease (SCOLIV) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the onset of progressive hepatic dysfunction usually in the first years of life. Affected individuals show feeding difficulties with failure to thrive and features such as jaundice, hepatomegaly, and abdominal distension. Laboratory workup is consistent with hepatic insufficiency and may also show coagulation defects, anemia, or metabolic disturbances. Cirrhosis and hypernodularity are commonly observed on liver biopsy. Many patients die of liver failure in early childhood (Moreno Traspas et al., 2022). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1823968
Concept ID:
C5774195
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Decreased circulating vitamin E concentration

A reduced concentration of vitamin E in the blood circulation. Vitamin E is a lipophilic vitamin that is also known as alpha-tocopherol. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
21881
Concept ID:
C0042875
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...