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1.

Familial Mediterranean fever

Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is divided into two phenotypes: type 1 and type 2. FMF type 1 is characterized by recurrent short episodes of inflammation and serositis including fever, peritonitis, synovitis, pleuritis, and, rarely, pericarditis and meningitis. The symptoms and severity vary among affected individuals, sometimes even among members of the same family. Amyloidosis, which can lead to renal failure, is the most severe complication, if untreated. FMF type 2 is characterized by amyloidosis as the first clinical manifestation of FMF in an otherwise asymptomatic individual. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
45811
Concept ID:
C0031069
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease, primarily of the joints, with autoimmune features and a complex genetic component. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
2078
Concept ID:
C0003873
Disease or Syndrome
3.

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease due to SH2D1A deficiency

X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) has two recognizable subtypes, XLP1 and XLP2. XLP1 is characterized predominantly by one of three commonly recognized phenotypes: Inappropriate immune response to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) or severe mononucleosis. Dysgammaglobulinemia. Lymphoproliferative disease (malignant lymphoma). XLP2 is most often characterized by HLH (often associated with EBV), dysgammaglobulinemia, and inflammatory bowel disease. HLH resulting from EBV infection is associated with an unregulated and exaggerated immune response with widespread proliferation of cytotoxic T cells, EBV-infected B cells, and macrophages. Dysgammaglobulinemia is typically hypogammaglobulinemia of one or more immunoglobulin subclasses. The malignant lymphomas are typically B-cell lymphomas, non-Hodgkin type, often extranodal, and in particular involving the intestine. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1770239
Concept ID:
C5399825
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency 1

Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of neutrophil function resulting from a deficiency of the beta-2 integrin subunit of the leukocyte cell adhesion molecule. The leukocyte cell adhesion molecule is present on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and granulocytes and mediates cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. LAD is characterized by recurrent bacterial infections; impaired pus formation and wound healing; abnormalities of a wide variety of adhesion-dependent functions of granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes; and a lack of beta-2/alpha-L, beta-2/alpha-M, and beta-2/alpha-X expression. Genetic Heterogeneity of Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Also see LAD2 (266265), caused by mutation in the SLC35C1 gene (605881), and LAD3 (612840), caused by mutation in the FERMT3 gene (607901). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
98310
Concept ID:
C0398738
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Mevalonic aciduria

Mevalonic aciduria (MEVA), the first recognized defect in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and isoprenoids, is a consequence of a deficiency of mevalonate kinase (ATP:mevalonate 5-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.36). Mevalonic acid accumulates because of failure of conversion to 5-phosphomevalonic acid, which is catalyzed by mevalonate kinase. Mevalonic acid is synthesized from 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, a reaction catalyzed by HMG-CoA reductase (142910). Mevalonic aciduria is characterized by dysmorphology, psychomotor retardation, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and recurrent febrile crises, usually manifesting in early infancy, accompanied by hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, arthralgia, and skin rash. The febrile crises are similar to those observed in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and to periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; 260920), which is also caused by mutation in the MVK gene (summary by Prietsch et al., 2003). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
368373
Concept ID:
C1959626
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Familial amyloid nephropathy with urticaria AND deafness

Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) is characterized by episodic skin rash, arthralgias, and fever associated with late-onset sensorineural deafness and renal amyloidosis (Dode et al., 2002). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120634
Concept ID:
C0268390
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 1

Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are a group of conditions that have overlapping signs and symptoms and the same genetic cause. The group includes three conditions known as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome type 1 (FCAS1), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disorder (NOMID). These conditions were once thought to be distinct disorders but are now considered to be part of the same condition spectrum. FCAS1 is the least severe form of CAPS, MWS is intermediate in severity, and NOMID is the most severe form.

The signs and symptoms of CAPS affect multiple body systems. Generally, CAPS are characterized by periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain. These episodes can be triggered by exposure to cold temperatures, fatigue, other stressors, or they may arise spontaneously. Episodes can last from a few hours to several days. These episodes typically begin in infancy or early childhood and persist throughout life.

In people with NOMID, the signs and symptoms of the condition are usually present from birth and persists throughout life. In addition to skin rash and fever, affected individuals may have joint inflammation, swelling, and joint deformities called contractures that may restrict movement. People with NOMID typically have headaches, seizures, and cognitive impairment resulting from chronic meningitis, which is inflammation of the tissue that covers and protects the brain and spinal cord (meninges). Other features of NOMID include eye problems, short stature, distinctive facial features, and kidney damage caused by amyloidosis.

While the CAPS spectrum shares similar signs and symptoms, the individual conditions tend to have distinct patterns of features. People with FCAS1 are particularly sensitive to the cold, and exposure to cold temperatures can trigger a painful or burning rash. The rash usually affects the torso and limbs but may spread to the rest of the body. In addition to fever and joint pain, other possible symptoms include muscle aches, chills, drowsiness, eye redness, headache, and nausea.

Individuals with MWS develop the typical periodic episodes of skin rash, fever, and joint pain after cold exposure, although episodes may occur spontaneously or all the time. Additionally, they can develop progressive hearing loss in their teenage years. Other features of MWS include skin lesions or kidney damage from abnormal deposits of a protein called amyloid (amyloidosis). [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
1647324
Concept ID:
C4551895
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous and articular syndrome

Chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular syndrome (CINCA) is an early-onset, severe, chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by cutaneous symptoms, central nervous system involvement, and arthropathy (Feldmann et al., 2002). See also familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-1 (FCAS1, CAPS1; 120100), an allelic disorder with a less severe phenotype. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
98370
Concept ID:
C0409818
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Granulomatous disease, chronic, autosomal recessive, cytochrome b-positive, type 3

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder of phagocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and eosinophils) resulting from impaired killing of bacteria and fungi. CGD is characterized by severe recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and dysregulated inflammatory responses resulting in granuloma formation and other inflammatory disorders such as colitis. Infections typically involve the lung (pneumonia), lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), liver (abscess), bone (osteomyelitis), and skin (abscesses or cellulitis). Granulomas typically involve the genitourinary system (bladder) and gastrointestinal tract (often the pylorus initially, and later the esophagus, jejunum, ileum, cecum, rectum, and perirectal area). Some males with X-linked CGD have McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome as the result of a contiguous gene deletion. While CGD may present anytime from infancy to late adulthood, the vast majority of affected individuals are diagnosed before age five years. Use of antimicrobial prophylaxis and therapy has greatly improved overall survival. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
462759
Concept ID:
C3151409
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Vasculitis due to ADA2 deficiency

Adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency (DADA2) is a complex systemic autoinflammatory disorder in which vasculopathy/vasculitis, dysregulated immune function, and/or hematologic abnormalities may predominate. Inflammatory features include intermittent fevers, rash (often livedo racemosa/reticularis), and musculoskeletal involvement (myalgia/arthralgia, arthritis, myositis). Vasculitis, which usually begins before age ten years, may manifest as early-onset ischemic (lacunar) and/or hemorrhagic strokes, or as cutaneous or systemic polyarteritis nodosa. Hypertension and hepatosplenomegaly are often found. More severe involvement may lead to progressive central neurologic deficits (dysarthria, ataxia, cranial nerve palsies, cognitive impairment) or to ischemic injury to the kidney, intestine, and/or digits. Dysregulation of immune function can lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity of varying severity; lymphadenopathy may be present and some affected individuals have had lymphoproliferative disease. Hematologic disorders may begin early in life or in late adulthood, and can include lymphopenia, neutropenia, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. Of note, both interfamilial and intrafamilial phenotypic variability (e.g., in age of onset, frequency and severity of manifestations) can be observed; also, individuals with biallelic ADA2 pathogenic variants may remain asymptomatic until adulthood or may never develop clinical manifestations of DADA2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
854497
Concept ID:
C3887654
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Lymphoproliferative syndrome 1

Lymphoproliferative syndrome-1 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by onset in early childhood of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated immune dysregulation, manifest as lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, Hodgkin disease, and/or hypogammaglobulinemia. Autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia or renal disease, may also occur. Patients show a high EBV viral load and decreased invariant natural killer T cells. It is unknown whether patients with ITK mutations are intrinsically susceptible to development of lymphoma or dysgammaglobulinemia in the absence of EBV infection (summary by Stepensky et al., 2011; Linka et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of lymphoproliferative syndrome, see XLP1 (308240). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
765548
Concept ID:
C3552634
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome 2

Familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (FCAS2) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by episodic and recurrent rash, urticaria, arthralgia, myalgia, and headache. In most patients, these episodes are accompanied by fever and serologic evidence of inflammation. Most, but not all, patients report exposure to cold as a trigger for the episodes. Additional features may include abdominal pain, thoracic pain, and sensorineural deafness. The age at onset is variable, ranging from the first year of life to middle age, and the severity and clinical manifestations are heterogeneous (summary by Shen et al., 2017). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, see FCAS1 (120100). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
435869
Concept ID:
C2673198
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 1

This autosomal recessive systemic autoinflammatory disorder is characterized by early childhood onset of annular erythematous plaques on the face and extremities with subsequent development of partial lipodystrophy and laboratory evidence of immune dysregulation. More variable features include recurrent fever, severe joint contractures, muscle weakness and atrophy, hepatosplenomegaly, basal ganglia calcifications, and microcytic anemia (summary by Agarwal et al., 2010; Kitamura et al., 2011; Arima et al., 2011). This disorder encompasses Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome (NKJO); joint contractures, muscular atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP syndrome); and chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature syndrome (CANDLE). Among Japanese patients, this disorder is best described as Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, since both Nakajo (1939) and Nishimura et al. (1950) contributed to the original phenotypic descriptions. Genetic Heterogeneity of Proteasome-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome See also PRAAS2 (618048), caused by mutation in the POMP gene (613386) on chromosome 13q12; PRAAS3 (617591), caused by mutation in the PSMB4 gene (602177) on chromosome 1q21; PRAAS4 (619183), caused by mutation in the PSMG2 gene (609702) on chromosome 18p11; and PRAAS5 (619175), caused by mutation in the PSMB10 gene (176847) on chromosome 16q22. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648310
Concept ID:
C4746851
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Pyogenic arthritis-pyoderma gangrenosum-acne syndrome

A rare pleiotropic auto-inflammatory disorder of childhood, primarily affecting the joints and skin. The first affected family contained ten affected members from three generations and manifested variable expression of a pauciarticular, nonaxial, arthritis that began in childhood; pyoderma gangrenosum; and severe cystic acne in adolescence and beyond. Recurrent sterile arthritis usually occurs after minor trauma, but can also occur spontaneously. PAPA syndrome is a self-limiting disease, but it can lead to severe joint destruction. The gene responsible for the syndrome is the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1). [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
346801
Concept ID:
C1858361
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Sterile multifocal osteomyelitis with periostitis and pustulosis

Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis-2 with periostitis and pustulosis (CRMO2) is an autosomal recessive multisystemic autoinflammatory disorder characterized by onset of symptoms in early infancy. Affected individuals present with joint swelling and pain, pustular rash, oral mucosal lesions, and fetal distress. The disorder progresses in severity to generalized severe pustulosis or ichthyosiform lesions and diffuse bone lesions. Radiographic studies show widening of the anterior rib ends, periosteal elevation along multiple long bones, multifocal osteolytic lesions, heterotopic ossification, and metaphyseal erosions of the long bones. Laboratory studies show elevation of inflammatory markers. The disorder results from unopposed activation of the IL1 inflammatory signaling pathway. Treatment with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra may result in clinical improvement (Aksentijevich et al., 2009). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of CRMO, see 609628. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
411230
Concept ID:
C2748507
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome, type III caused by mutation in PRKCD

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation. The phenotype is variable, but most patients have significant lymphadenopathy associated with variable autoimmune manifestations. Some patients may have recurrent infections. Lymphocyte accumulation results from a combination of impaired apoptosis and excessive proliferation (summary by Oliveira, 2013). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ALPS, see 601859. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
816258
Concept ID:
C3809928
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Periodic fever-infantile enterocolitis-autoinflammatory syndrome

Autoinflammation with infantile enterocolitis is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of recurrent flares of autoinflammation in early infancy. Affected individuals tend to have poor overall growth and gastrointestinal symptoms in infancy associated with laboratory evidence of activated inflammation. This initial presentation is followed by recurrent febrile episodes with splenomegaly and sometimes hematologic disturbances, arthralgias, or myalgias. The disorder results from overactivation of an arm of the immune response system (Romberg et al., 2014; Canna et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
863504
Concept ID:
C4015067
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis

Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (AFND) is an autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by onset of recurrent fever and dermatologic abnormalities in childhood. Laboratory studies show elevated acute-phase reactants and activation of the inflammatory response, particularly IL1B (147720). Additional more variable features may include myalgia and arthralgia (summary by Masters et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
43097
Concept ID:
C0085077
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Platelet abnormalities with eosinophilia and immune-mediated inflammatory disease

Immunodeficiency-71 with inflammatory disease and congenital thrombocytopenia (IMD71) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by the onset of recurrent infections and inflammatory features such as vasculitis and eczema in infancy or early childhood. Infectious agents include bacteria and viruses. Laboratory findings are variable, but usually show thrombocytopenia, sometimes with abnormal platelet morphology, increased serum IgE, IgA, or IgM, leukocytosis, decreased or increased T lymphocytes, and increased eosinophils. Detailed studies show impaired neutrophil and T-cell chemotaxis, as well as impaired T-cell activation due to defects in F-actin (see 102610) polymerization (summary by Brigida et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1618052
Concept ID:
C4540232
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Autoimmune interstitial lung disease-arthritis syndrome

Autoimmune interstitial lung, joint, and kidney disease is an autosomal dominant systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by interstitial lung disease, inflammatory arthritis, and immune complex-mediated renal disease. Laboratory studies show high-titer autoantibodies. Symptoms appear in the first 2 decades of life, but there is incomplete penetrance (summary by Watkin et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1800821
Concept ID:
C5243948
Disease or Syndrome
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