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1.

Malignant hyperthermia, susceptibility to, 1

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances cause uncontrolled release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of extracellular calcium into the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some individuals with MHS will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
443948
Concept ID:
C2930980
Finding
2.

Periodic hyperkalemic paralysis

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is characterized by attacks of flaccid limb weakness (which may also include weakness of the muscles of the eyes, throat, breathing muscles, and trunk), hyperkalemia (serum potassium concentration >5 mmol/L) or an increase of serum potassium concentration of at least 1.5 mmol/L during an attack of weakness and/or provoking/worsening of an attack by oral potassium intake, normal serum potassium between attacks, and onset before age 20 years. In approximately half of affected individuals, attacks of flaccid muscle weakness begin in the first decade of life, with 25% reporting their first attack at age ten years or older. Initially infrequent, the attacks then increase in frequency and severity over time until approximately age 50 years, after which the frequency of attacks declines considerably. The major attack trigger is eating potassium-rich foods; other triggers include: cold environment; rest after exercise, stress, or fatigue; alcohol; hunger; and changes in activity level. A spontaneous attack commonly starts in the morning before breakfast, lasts for 15 minutes to one hour, and then passes. Individuals with hyperPP frequently have myotonia (muscle stiffness), especially around the time of an episode of weakness. Paramyotonia (muscle stiffness aggravated by cold and exercise) is present in about 45% of affected individuals. More than 80% of individuals with hyperPP older than age 40 years report permanent muscle weakness and about one third develop a chronic progressive myopathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
68665
Concept ID:
C0238357
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Infantile nephronophthisis

The nephronophthisis (NPH) phenotype is characterized by reduced renal concentrating ability, chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, cystic renal disease, and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) before age 30 years. Three age-based clinical subtypes are recognized: infantile, juvenile, and adolescent/adult. Infantile NPH can present in utero with oligohydramnios sequence (limb contractures, pulmonary hypoplasia, and facial dysmorphisms) or postnatally with renal manifestations that progress to ESRD before age 3 years. Juvenile NPH, the most prevalent subtype, typically presents with polydipsia and polyuria, growth retardation, chronic iron-resistant anemia, or other findings related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is typically absent due to salt wasting. ESRD develops at a median age of 13 years. Ultrasound findings are increased echogenicity, reduced corticomedullary differentiation, and renal cysts (in 50% of affected individuals). Histologic findings include tubulointerstitial fibrosis, thickened and disrupted tubular basement membrane, sporadic corticomedullary cysts, and normal or reduced kidney size. Adolescent/adult NPH is clinically similar to juvenile NPH, but ESRD develops at a median age of 19 years. Within a subtype, inter- and intrafamilial variability in rate of progression to ESRD is considerable. Approximately 80%-90% of individuals with the NPH phenotype have no extrarenal features (i.e., they have isolated NPH); ~10%-20% have extrarenal manifestations that constitute a recognizable syndrome (e.g., Joubert syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Jeune syndrome and related skeletal disorders, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, Senior-Løken syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, COACH syndrome, and oculomotor apraxia, Cogan type). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
355574
Concept ID:
C1865872
Disease or Syndrome
4.

3 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency

Classic 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency is an autosomal recessive form of CAH characterized by a severe impairment of steroid biosynthesis in both the adrenals and the gonads, resulting in decreased excretion of cortisol and aldosterone and of progesterone, androgens, and estrogens by these tissues. Affected newborns exhibit signs and symptoms of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiencies, which may be fatal if not diagnosed and treated early, especially in the severe salt-wasting form. Moreover, male newborns exhibit pseudohermaphroditism with incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia due to an impairment of androgen biosynthesis in the testis. In contrast, affected females exhibit normal sexual differentiation or partial virilization (summary by Rheaume et al., 1992). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
452446
Concept ID:
C0342471
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1

Autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type I, including PHA1B1, is characterized by renal salt wasting and high concentrations of sodium in sweat, stool, and saliva. The disorder involves multiple organ systems and is especially threatening in the neonatal period. Laboratory evaluation shows hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and increased plasma renin activity with high serum aldosterone concentrations. Respiratory tract infections are common in affected children and may be mistaken for cystic fibrosis (CF; 219700). Aggressive salt replacement and control of hyperkalemia results in survival, and the disorder appears to become less severe with age (review by Scheinman et al., 1999). A milder, autosomal dominant form of type I pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA1A; 177735) is caused by mutations in the mineralocorticoid receptor gene (MCR, NR3C2; 600983). Gitelman syndrome (263800), another example of primary renal tubular salt wasting, is due to mutation in the thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (SLC12A3; 600968). Hanukoglu and Hanukoglu (2016) provided a detailed review of the ENaC gene family, including structure, function, tissue distribution, and associated inherited diseases. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1823950
Concept ID:
C5774176
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Antley-Bixler syndrome with genital anomalies and disordered steroidogenesis

Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) is a disorder of steroidogenesis with a broad phenotypic spectrum including cortisol deficiency, altered sex steroid synthesis, disorders of sex development (DSD), and skeletal malformations of the Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) phenotype. Cortisol deficiency is usually partial, with some baseline cortisol production but failure to mount an adequate cortisol response in stress. Mild mineralocorticoid excess can be present and causes arterial hypertension, usually presenting in young adulthood. Manifestations of altered sex steroid synthesis include ambiguous genitalia/DSD in both males and females, large ovarian cysts in females, poor masculinization and delayed puberty in males, and maternal virilization during pregnancy with an affected fetus. Skeletal malformations can manifest as craniosynostosis, mid-face retrusion with proptosis and choanal stenosis or atresia, low-set dysplastic ears with stenotic external auditory canals, hydrocephalus, radiohumeral synostosis, neonatal fractures, congenital bowing of the long bones, joint contractures, arachnodactyly, and clubfeet; other anomalies observed include urinary tract anomalies (renal pelvic dilatation, vesicoureteral reflux). Cognitive impairment is of minor concern and likely associated with the severity of malformations; studies of developmental outcomes are lacking. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
461449
Concept ID:
C3150099
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2C

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
327089
Concept ID:
C1840391
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Isolated hyperchlorhidrosis

Isolated hyperchlorhidrosis (HYCHL) is an autosomal recessive condition in which excessive salt wasting in sweat can result in severe infantile hyponatremic dehydration and hyperkalemia (summary by Muhammad et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333560
Concept ID:
C1840437
Finding
9.

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2B

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
374457
Concept ID:
C1840390
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Myoglobinuria, acute recurrent, autosomal recessive

Recurrent myoglobinuria is characterized by recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis associated with muscle pain and weakness and followed by excretion of myoglobin in the urine. Renal failure may occasionally occur. Onset is usually in early childhood under the age of 5 years. Unlike the exercise-induced rhabdomyolyses such as McArdle syndrome (232600), carnitine palmitoyltransferase deficiency (see 255110), and the Creteil variety of phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency (311800), the attacks in recurrent myoglobinuria no relation to exercise, but are triggered by intercurrent illnesses, commonly upper respiratory tract infections (Ramesh and Gardner-Medwin, 1992). See 160010 for discussion of a possible autosomal dominant form of myoglobinuria. Severe rhabdomyolysis is a major clinical feature of anesthetic-induced malignant hyperthermia (145600), an autosomal dominant disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
340308
Concept ID:
C1849386
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2D

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
483335
Concept ID:
C3469605
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Hereditary cryohydrocytosis with reduced stomatin

Stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis with neurologic defects is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development, seizures, cataracts, and pseudohyperkalemia resulting from defects in the red blood cell membrane. The disorder combines the neurologic features of Glut1 deficiency syndrome-1 (GLUT1DS1; 606777), resulting from impaired glucose transport at the blood-brain barrier, and hemolytic anemia/pseudohyperkalemia with stomatocytosis, resulting from a cation leak in erythrocytes (summary by Bawazir et al., 2012). For a discussion of clinical and genetic heterogeneity of red cell stomatocyte disorders, see 194380. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
332390
Concept ID:
C1837206
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Malignant hyperthermia, susceptibility to, 2

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances cause uncontrolled release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of extracellular calcium into the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some individuals with MHS will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
419301
Concept ID:
C2930981
Finding
14.

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2A

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
327088
Concept ID:
C1840389
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Malignant hyperthermia, susceptibility to, 3

Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle calcium regulation associated with uncontrolled skeletal muscle hypermetabolism. Manifestations of malignant hyperthermia (MH) are precipitated by certain volatile anesthetics (i.e., halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, enflurane), either alone or in conjunction with a depolarizing muscle relaxant (specifically, succinylcholine). The triggering substances cause uncontrolled release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and may promote entry of extracellular calcium into the myoplasm, causing contracture of skeletal muscles, glycogenolysis, and increased cellular metabolism, resulting in production of heat and excess lactate. Affected individuals experience acidosis, hypercapnia, tachycardia, hyperthermia, muscle rigidity, compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis with subsequent increase in serum creatine kinase (CK) concentration, hyperkalemia with a risk for cardiac arrhythmia or even cardiac arrest, and myoglobinuria with a risk for renal failure. In nearly all cases, the first manifestations of MH (tachycardia and tachypnea) occur in the operating room; however, MH may also occur in the early postoperative period. There is mounting evidence that some individuals with MHS will also develop MH with exercise and/or on exposure to hot environments. Without proper and prompt treatment with dantrolene sodium, mortality is extremely high. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
418956
Concept ID:
C2930982
Finding
16.

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2E

Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is characterized by hyperkalemia despite normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and frequently by hypertension. Other associated findings in both children and adults include hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis, and suppressed plasma renin levels. Aldosterone levels are variable, but are relatively low given the degree of hyperkalemia (elevated serum potassium is a potent stimulus for aldosterone secretion). Hypercalciuria is well described. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
483336
Concept ID:
C3469606
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Corticosterone 18-monooxygenase deficiency

CMO type I deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the penultimate biochemical step of aldosterone biosynthesis, the 18-hydroxylation of corticosterone (B) to 18-hydroxycorticosterone (18-OHB). This enzymatic defect results in decreased aldosterone and salt-wasting. In CMO I deficiency, aldosterone is undetectable, whereas its immediate precursor, 18-OHB, is low or normal. These patients have an increased ratio of corticosterone to 18-OHB (Portrat-Doyen et al., 1998). The CYP11B2 gene product also catalyzes the final step in aldosterone biosynthesis: the 18-oxidation of 18-OHB to aldosterone. A defect in that enzymatic step results in CMO type II deficiency (610600), an allelic disorder with an overlapping phenotype but distinct biochemical features. In CMO II deficiency, aldosterone can be low or normal, but at the expense of increased secretion of 18-OHB. These patients have a low ratio of corticosterone to 18-OHB (Portrat-Doyen et al., 1998). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82784
Concept ID:
C0268293
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Corticosterone methyloxidase type 2 deficiency

CMO type II deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the final biochemical step of aldosterone biosynthesis, the 18-hydroxylation of 18-hydroxycorticosterone (18-OHB) to aldosterone. This enzymatic defect results in decreased aldosterone and salt-wasting associated with an increased serum ratio of 18-OHB to aldosterone. In CMO II deficiency, aldosterone can be low or normal, but at the expense of increased secretion of 18-OHB. These patients have a low ratio of corticosterone to 18-OHB (Portrat-Doyen et al., 1998). The CYP11B2 gene product also catalyzes an earlier step in aldosterone biosynthesis: the 18-hydroxylation of corticosterone to 18-OHB. A defect in that enzymatic step results in CMO type I deficiency (204300), an allelic disorder with an overlapping phenotype but distinct biochemical features. In CMO I deficiency, aldosterone is undetectable, whereas its immediate precursor, 18-OHB, is low or normal (Portrat-Doyen et al., 1998). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
483046
Concept ID:
C3463917
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Autosomal dominant pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1

Autosomal dominant pseudohypoaldosteronism type I (PHA1A) is characterized by salt wasting resulting from renal unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Patients may present with neonatal renal salt wasting with hyperkalaemic acidosis despite high aldosterone levels. These patients improve with age and usually become asymptomatic without treatment. Some adult patients with the disorder may have elevated aldosterone levels, but no history of clinical disease. This observation suggests that only those infants whose salt homeostasis is stressed by intercurrent illness and volume depletion develop clinically recognized PHA I (summary by Geller et al., 1998). Autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type I (see PHA1B1, 264350), caused by mutation in any one of 3 genes encoding the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), is a similar but more severe systemic disorder with persistence into adulthood. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
260623
Concept ID:
C1449842
Disease or Syndrome
20.

MIRAGE syndrome

MIRAGE syndrome is an acronym for the major findings of myelodysplasia, infection, restriction of growth, adrenal hypoplasia, genital phenotypes, and enteropathy. Cytopenias are typically seen soon after birth; thrombocytopenia is the most common followed by anemia and pancytopenia. Recurrent infections from early infancy include pneumonia, urinary tract infection, gastroenteritis, meningitis, otitis media, dermatitis, subcutaneous abscess, and sepsis. Reported genital phenotypes in those with 46,XY karyotype included hypospadias, microphallus, bifid shawl scrotum, ambiguous genitalia, or complete female genitalia. Hypoplastic or dysgenetic ovaries have been reported in females. Gastrointestinal complications include chronic diarrhea and esophageal dysfunction. Moderate-to-severe developmental delay is reported in most affected individuals. Autonomic dysfunction and renal dysfunction are also reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
924576
Concept ID:
C4284088
Disease or Syndrome
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