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Familial hypertryptophanemia(HYPTRP)

MedGen UID:
419177
Concept ID:
C2931837
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: Hypertryptophanemia; Hypertryptophanemia, Familial
SNOMED CT: Familial hypertryptophanemia (721838005)
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Source: Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in individuals with two pathogenic alleles, either homozygotes (two copies of the same mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
 
Gene (location): TDO2 (4q32.1)
 
Monarch Initiative: MONDO:0010907
OMIM®: 600627
Orphanet: ORPHA2224

Definition

Congenital hypertryptophanemia, which is accompanied by hyperserotonemia, does not appear to have significant clinical consequences (Ferreira et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

Clinical features

From HPO
Tryptophanuria
MedGen UID:
75684
Concept ID:
C0268472
Disease or Syndrome
An increased concentration of tryptophan in the urine.
Pes planus
MedGen UID:
42034
Concept ID:
C0016202
Anatomical Abnormality
A foot where the longitudinal arch of the foot is in contact with the ground or floor when the individual is standing; or, in a patient lying supine, a foot where the arch is in contact with the surface of a flat board pressed against the sole of the foot by the examiner with a pressure similar to that expected from weight bearing; or, the height of the arch is reduced.
Thumbs, congenital Clasped
MedGen UID:
98140
Concept ID:
C0431886
Congenital Abnormality
In the resting position, the tip of the thumb is on, or near, the palm, close to the base of the fourth or fifth finger.
Limited elbow extension
MedGen UID:
401158
Concept ID:
C1867103
Finding
Limited ability to straighten the arm at the elbow joint.
Sensorineural hearing loss disorder
MedGen UID:
9164
Concept ID:
C0018784
Disease or Syndrome
A type of hearing impairment in one or both ears related to an abnormal functionality of the cochlear nerve.
Aggressive behavior
MedGen UID:
1375
Concept ID:
C0001807
Individual Behavior
Behavior or an act aimed at harming a person, animal, or physical property (e.g., acts of physical violence; shouting, swearing, and using harsh language; slashing someone's tires).
Depression
MedGen UID:
4229
Concept ID:
C0011581
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Frequently experiencing feelings of being down, miserable, and/or hopeless; struggling to recover from these moods; having a pessimistic outlook on the future; feeling a pervasive sense of shame; having a low self-worth; experiencing thoughts of suicide and engaging in suicidal behavior.
Intellectual disability, moderate
MedGen UID:
7680
Concept ID:
C0026351
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Moderate mental retardation is defined as an intelligence quotient (IQ) in the range of 35-49.
Stuttering
MedGen UID:
20981
Concept ID:
C0038506
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Disruptions in the production of speech sounds, with involuntary repetitions of words or parts of words, prolongations of speech sounds, or complete blockage of speech production for several seconds.
Emotional lability
MedGen UID:
39319
Concept ID:
C0085633
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Unstable emotional experiences and frequent mood changes; emotions that are easily aroused, intense, and/or disproportionate to events and circumstances.
Hypersexuality
MedGen UID:
137208
Concept ID:
C0312420
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Pathological persistent sexual disinhibiting behavior, directed towards oneself or others.
Global developmental delay
MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding
A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age.
Intellectual disability
MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
Intellectual disability, previously referred to as mental retardation, is characterized by subnormal intellectual functioning that occurs during the developmental period. It is defined by an IQ score below 70.
Camptodactyly of finger
MedGen UID:
98041
Concept ID:
C0409348
Finding
The distal interphalangeal joint and/or the proximal interphalangeal joint of the fingers cannot be extended to 180 degrees by either active or passive extension.
Generalized joint hypermobility
MedGen UID:
322888
Concept ID:
C1836308
Finding
Joint hypermobility (ability of a joint to move beyond its normal range of motion) affecting many or all joints of the body. In individuals with Joint hypermobility at multiple sites (usually five or more), the term generalized joint hypermobility is preferred.
Hypertryptophanemia
MedGen UID:
1618729
Concept ID:
C4521096
Finding
An increased amount of tryptophan in the blood.
Increased serum serotonin
MedGen UID:
488950
Concept ID:
C0877243
Finding
A increased concentration of serotonin in the blood.
Hypertelorism
MedGen UID:
9373
Concept ID:
C0020534
Finding
Although hypertelorism means an excessive distance between any paired organs (e.g., the nipples), the use of the word has come to be confined to ocular hypertelorism. Hypertelorism occurs as an isolated feature and is also a feature of many syndromes, e.g., Opitz G syndrome (see 300000), Greig cephalopolysyndactyly (175700), and Noonan syndrome (163950) (summary by Cohen et al., 1995).
Myopia
MedGen UID:
44558
Concept ID:
C0027092
Disease or Syndrome
Nearsightedness, also known as myopia, is an eye condition that causes blurry distance vision. People who are nearsighted have more trouble seeing things that are far away (such as when driving) than things that are close up (such as when reading or using a computer). If it is not treated with corrective lenses or surgery, nearsightedness can lead to squinting, eyestrain, headaches, and significant visual impairment.\n\nNearsightedness usually begins in childhood or adolescence. It tends to worsen with age until adulthood, when it may stop getting worse (stabilize). In some people, nearsightedness improves in later adulthood.\n\nFor normal vision, light passes through the clear cornea at the front of the eye and is focused by the lens onto the surface of the retina, which is the lining of the back of the eye that contains light-sensing cells. People who are nearsighted typically have eyeballs that are too long from front to back. As a result, light entering the eye is focused too far forward, in front of the retina instead of on its surface. It is this change that causes distant objects to appear blurry. The longer the eyeball is, the farther forward light rays will be focused and the more severely nearsighted a person will be.\n\nNearsightedness is measured by how powerful a lens must be to correct it. The standard unit of lens power is called a diopter. Negative (minus) powered lenses are used to correct nearsightedness. The more severe a person's nearsightedness, the larger the number of diopters required for correction. In an individual with nearsightedness, one eye may be more nearsighted than the other.\n\nEye doctors often refer to nearsightedness less than -5 or -6 diopters as "common myopia." Nearsightedness of -6 diopters or more is commonly called "high myopia." This distinction is important because high myopia increases a person's risk of developing other eye problems that can lead to permanent vision loss or blindness. These problems include tearing and detachment of the retina, clouding of the lens (cataract), and an eye disease called glaucoma that is usually related to increased pressure within the eye. The risk of these other eye problems increases with the severity of the nearsightedness. The term "pathological myopia" is used to describe cases in which high myopia leads to tissue damage within the eye.
Strabismus
MedGen UID:
21337
Concept ID:
C0038379
Disease or Syndrome
A misalignment of the eyes so that the visual axes deviate from bifoveal fixation. The classification of strabismus may be based on a number of features including the relative position of the eyes, whether the deviation is latent or manifest, intermittent or constant, concomitant or otherwise and according to the age of onset and the relevance of any associated refractive error.
Visual impairment
MedGen UID:
777085
Concept ID:
C3665347
Finding
Visual impairment (or vision impairment) is vision loss (of a person) to such a degree as to qualify as an additional support need through a significant limitation of visual capability resulting from either disease, trauma, or congenital or degenerative conditions that cannot be corrected by conventional means, such as refractive correction, medication, or surgery.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews,  VClinVar  
  • Familial hypertryptophanemia
Follow this link to review classifications for Familial hypertryptophanemia in Orphanet.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

McHugh KR, DeVore AD, Mentz RJ, Edmonston D, Green JB, Hernandez AF
Clin Cardiol 2018 Sep;41(9):1259-1267. Epub 2018 Sep 21 doi: 10.1002/clc.23054. PMID: 30125365Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Clinical prediction guides

Prajapati KP, Anand BG, Ansari M, Tiku AB, Kar K
Nanoscale 2022 Nov 10;14(43):16270-16285. doi: 10.1039/d2nr03544h. PMID: 36300424

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