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Items: 17

1.

Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia

Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) resulting in short stature, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. Radiographic manifestations of SED include ovoid and mildly flattened vertebral bodies, small ilia with shallow dysplastic acetabular fossae, and small deformed capital femoral epiphyses. Nearly all affected individuals have progressive steroid-resistant nephropathy, usually developing within five years of the diagnosis of growth failure and terminating with end-stage renal disease. The majority of tested individuals have T-cell deficiency and an associated risk for opportunistic infection, a common cause of death. SIOD involves a spectrum that ranges from an infantile or severe early-onset form with a greater risk of death during childhood to a juvenile or milder later-onset form with likely survival into adulthood if renal disease is appropriately treated. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
164078
Concept ID:
C0877024
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-B

GLB1-related disorders comprise two phenotypically distinct lysosomal storage disorders: GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB (MPS IVB). The phenotype of GM1 gangliosidosis constitutes a spectrum ranging from severe (infantile) to intermediate (late-infantile and juvenile) to mild (chronic/adult). Type I (infantile) GM1 gangliosidosis begins before age 12 months. Prenatal manifestations may include nonimmune hydrops fetalis, intrauterine growth restriction, and placental vacuolization; congenital dermal melanocytosis (Mongolian spots) may be observed. Macular cherry-red spot is detected on eye exam. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction leads to spasticity and rapid regression; blindness, deafness, decerebrate rigidity, seizures, feeding difficulties, and oral secretions are observed. Life expectancy is two to three years. Type II can be subdivided into the late-infantile (onset age 1-3 years) and juvenile (onset age 3-10 years) phenotypes. Central nervous system dysfunction manifests as progressive cognitive, motor, and speech decline as measured by psychometric testing. There may be mild corneal clouding, hepatosplenomegaly, and/or cardiomyopathy; the typical course is characterized by progressive neurologic decline, progressive skeletal disease in some individuals (including kyphosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads), and progressive feeding difficulties leading to aspiration risk. Type III begins in late childhood to the third decade with generalized dystonia leading to unsteady gait and speech disturbance followed by extrapyramidal signs including akinetic-rigid parkinsonism. Cardiomyopathy develops in some and skeletal involvement occurs in most. Intellectual impairment is common late in the disease with prognosis directly related to the degree of neurologic impairment. MPS IVB is characterized by skeletal dysplasia with specific findings of axial and appendicular dysostosis multiplex, short stature (below 15th centile in adults), kyphoscoliosis, coxa/genu valga, joint laxity, platyspondyly, and odontoid hypoplasia. First signs and symptoms may be apparent at birth. Bony involvement is progressive, with more than 84% of adults requiring ambulation aids; life span does not appear to be limited. Corneal clouding is detected in some individuals and cardiac valvular disease may develop. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
43376
Concept ID:
C0086652
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Saldino-Mainzer syndrome

Short-rib thoracic dysplasia (SRTD) with or without polydactyly refers to a group of autosomal recessive skeletal ciliopathies that are characterized by a constricted thoracic cage, short ribs, shortened tubular bones, and a 'trident' appearance of the acetabular roof. SRTD encompasses Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) and the disorders previously designated as Jeune syndrome or asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD), short rib-polydactyly syndrome (SRPS), and Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MZSDS). Polydactyly is variably present, and there is phenotypic overlap in the various forms of SRTDs, which differ by visceral malformation and metaphyseal appearance. Nonskeletal involvement can include cleft lip/palate as well as anomalies of major organs such as the brain, eye, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, intestines, and genitalia. Some forms of SRTD are lethal in the neonatal period due to respiratory insufficiency secondary to a severely restricted thoracic cage, whereas others are compatible with life (summary by Huber and Cormier-Daire, 2012 and Schmidts et al., 2013). There is phenotypic overlap with the cranioectodermal dysplasias (Sensenbrenner syndrome; see CED1, 218330). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of short-rib thoracic dysplasia, see SRTD1 (208500). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
341455
Concept ID:
C1849437
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia with congenital joint dislocations

CHST3-related skeletal dysplasia is characterized by short stature of prenatal onset, joint dislocations (knees, hips, radial heads), clubfeet, and limitation of range of motion that can involve all large joints. Kyphosis and occasionally scoliosis with slight shortening of the trunk develop in childhood. Minor heart valve dysplasia has been described in several persons. Intellect and vision are normal. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
373381
Concept ID:
C1837657
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia type 5

Autosomal dominant multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) presents in early childhood, usually with pain in the hips and/or knees after exercise. Affected children complain of fatigue with long-distance walking. Waddling gait may be present. Adult height is either in the lower range of normal or mildly shortened. The limbs are relatively short in comparison to the trunk. Pain and joint deformity progress, resulting in early-onset osteoarthritis, particularly of the large weight-bearing joints. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
335542
Concept ID:
C1846843
Disease or Syndrome
6.

COG1 congenital disorder of glycosylation

An extremely rare form of carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome with, in the few cases reported to date, variable signs including microcephaly, growth retardation, psychomotor retardation and facial dysmorphism. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
443957
Concept ID:
C2931011
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Geleophysic dysplasia 1

Geleophysic dysplasia, a progressive condition resembling a lysosomal storage disorder, is characterized by short stature, short hands and feet, progressive joint limitation and contractures, distinctive facial features, progressive cardiac valvular disease, and thickened skin. Intellect is normal. Major findings are likely to be present in the first year of life. Cardiac, respiratory, and lung involvement result in death before age five years in approximately 33% of individuals with ADAMTSL2-related geleophysic dysplasia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
479777
Concept ID:
C3278147
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Meier-Gorlin syndrome 5

Most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have distinctive facial features. In addition to being abnormally small, the ears may be low-set or rotated backward. Additional features can include a small mouth (microstomia), an underdeveloped lower jaw (micrognathia), full lips, and a narrow nose with a high nasal bridge.

Additional features of Meier-Gorlin syndrome can include difficulty feeding and a lung condition known as pulmonary emphysema or other breathing problems.

Abnormalities in sexual development may also occur in Meier-Gorlin syndrome. In some males with this condition, the testes are small or undescended (cryptorchidism). Affected females may have unusually small external genital folds (hypoplasia of the labia majora) and small breasts. Both males and females with this condition can have sparse or absent underarm (axillary) hair.

Meier-Gorlin syndrome is a condition primarily characterized by short stature. It is considered a form of primordial dwarfism because the growth problems begin before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). After birth, affected individuals continue to grow at a slow rate. Other characteristic features of this condition are underdeveloped or missing kneecaps (patellae), small ears, and, often, an abnormally small head (microcephaly). Despite a small head size, most people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have normal intellect.

Some people with Meier-Gorlin syndrome have other skeletal abnormalities, such as unusually narrow long bones in the arms and legs, a deformity of the knee joint that allows the knee to bend backwards (genu recurvatum), and slowed mineralization of bones (delayed bone age). [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
462476
Concept ID:
C3151126
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with multiple dislocations

Spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia with joint laxity type 2 (SEMDJL2) is characterized by short stature, distinctive midface retrusion, progressive knee malalignment (genu valgum and/or varum), generalized ligamentous laxity, and mild spinal deformity. Intellectual development is not impaired. Radiographic characteristics include significantly retarded epiphyseal ossification that evolves into epiphyseal dysplasia and precocious osteoarthritis, metaphyseal irregularities and vertical striations, constricted femoral neck, slender metacarpals and metatarsals, and mild thoracolumbar kyphosis or scoliosis with normal or mild platyspondyly (summary by Min et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of SEMD with joint laxity, see SEMDJL1 (271640). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
350960
Concept ID:
C1863732
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Bone fragility with contractures, arterial rupture, and deafness

Connective tissue disorder due to lysyl hydroxylase-3 deficiency is a rare, genetic disease, caused by lack of lysyl hydrohylase 3 (LH3) activity, characterized by multiple tissue and organ involvement, including skeletal abnormalities (club foot, progressive scoliosis, osteopenia, pathologic fractures), ocular involvement (flat retinae, myopia, cataracts) and hair, nail and skin anomalies (coarse, abnormally distributed hair, skin blistering, reduced palmar creases, hypoplastic nails). Patients also present intrauterine growth retardation, facial dysmorphism (flat facial profile, low-set ears, shallow orbits, short and upturned nose, downturned corners of mouth) and joint flexion contractures. Growth and developmental delay, bilateral sensorineural deafness, friable diaphragm and later-onset spontaneous vascular ruptures are additional reported features. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
382811
Concept ID:
C2676285
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Epiphyseal dysplasia, multiple, 7

MedGen UID:
1620874
Concept ID:
C4540251
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Immunoskeletal dysplasia with neurodevelopmental abnormalities

MedGen UID:
1381460
Concept ID:
C4479452
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, A4 type

The spondylometaphyseal dysplasias are a relatively common, heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by spinal and metaphyseal changes of variable pattern and severity. The classification of spondylometaphyseal dysplasias of Maroteaux and Spranger (1991) was based on changes of the femoral neck and the shape of vertebral anomalies. In this classification, type A4 referred to a form with severe metaphyseal changes of the femoral neck and ovoid, flattened vertebral bodies with anterior tongue-like deformities. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
324620
Concept ID:
C1836862
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Reardon type

Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, Reardon type is an extremely rare type of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (see this term) described in several members of a single family to date and characterized by short stature, vertebral and femoral abnormalities, cervical instability and neurologic manifestations secondary to anomalies of the odontoid process. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
322238
Concept ID:
C1833603
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Neurofacioskeletal syndrome with or without renal agenesis

Neurofacioskeletal syndrome with or without renal agenesis (NFSRA) is characterized by developmental delay and/or intellectual disability; corpus callosum hypoplasia or agenesis; facial dysmorphism, including upslanting palpebral fissures, broad nasal tip, and wide mouth; and skeletal abnormalities, including short stature, scoliosis, and flexion contractures, with broad fingertips and/or toes. Renal agenesis, unilateral or bilateral, has also been observed in some patients (Schneeberger et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1778926
Concept ID:
C5543070
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type 3

MedGen UID:
349167
Concept ID:
C1859439
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hypoplasia of the capital femoral epiphysis

Underdevelopment of the proximal epiphysis of the femur. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
374176
Concept ID:
C1839254
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