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Items: 12

1.

Oculodentodigital dysplasia

Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is characterized by a typical facial appearance and variable involvement of the eyes, dentition, and fingers. Characteristic facial features include a narrow, pinched nose with hypoplastic alae nasi, prominent columella and thin anteverted nares together with a narrow nasal bridge, and prominent epicanthic folds giving the impression of hypertelorism. The teeth are usually small and carious. Typical eye findings include microphthalmia and microcornea. The characteristic digital malformation is complete syndactyly of the fourth and fifth fingers (syndactyly type III) but the third finger may be involved and associated camptodactyly is a common finding (summary by Judisch et al., 1979). Neurologic abnormalities are sometimes associated (Gutmann et al., 1991), and lymphedema has been reported in some patients with ODDD (Brice et al., 2013). See review by De Bock et al. (2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculodentodigital Syndrome An autosomal recessive form of ODDD (257850) is also caused by mutation in the GJA1 gene, but the majority of cases are autosomal dominant. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
167236
Concept ID:
C0812437
Congenital Abnormality
2.

H syndrome

The histiocytosis-lymphadenopathy plus syndrome comprises features of 4 histiocytic disorders previously thought to be distinct: Faisalabad histiocytosis (FHC), sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), H syndrome, and pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus syndrome (PHID). FHC was described as an autosomal recessive disease involving joint deformities, sensorineural hearing loss, and subsequent development of generalized lymphadenopathy and swellings in the eyelids that contain histiocytes (summary by Morgan et al., 2010). SHML, or familial Rosai-Dorfman disease, was described as a rare cause of lymph node enlargement in children, consisting of chronic massive enlargement of cervical lymph nodes frequently accompanied by fever, leukocytosis, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Extranodal sites were involved in approximately 25% of patients, including salivary glands, orbit, eyelid, spleen, and testes. The involvement of retropharyngeal lymphoid tissue sometimes caused snoring and sleep apnea (summary by Kismet et al., 2005). H syndrome was characterized by cutaneous hyperpigmentation and hypertrichosis, hepatosplenomegaly, heart anomalies, and hypogonadism; hearing loss was also found in about half of patients, and many had short stature. PHID was characterized by predominantly antibody-negative insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus associated with pigmented hypertrichosis and variable occurrence of other features of H syndrome, with hepatosplenomegaly occurring in about half of patients (Cliffe et al., 2009). Bolze et al. (2012) noted that mutations in the SLC29A3 gene (612373) had been implicated in H syndrome, PHID, FHC, and SHML, and that some patients presented a combination of features from 2 or more of these syndromes, leading to the suggestion that these phenotypes should be grouped together as 'SLC29A3 disorder.' Bolze et al. (2012) suggested that the histologic features of the lesions seemed to be the most uniform phenotype in these patients. In addition, the immunophenotype of infiltrating cells in H syndrome patients was shown to be the same as that seen in patients with the familial form of Rosai-Dorfman disease, further supporting the relationship between these disorders (Avitan-Hersh et al., 2011; Colmenero et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400532
Concept ID:
C1864445
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Myofibrillar myopathy 8

Myofibrillar myopathy-8 (MFM8) is an autosomal recessive myopathy characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness and atrophy affecting the upper and lower limbs, resulting in increased falls, gait problems, difficulty running or climbing stairs, and upper limb weakness or scapular winging. Some patients develop distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The phenotype may also be consistent with a clinical diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Age at symptom onset ranges from infancy to adulthood. Ambulation is generally preserved and cardiac involvement is rare, but respiratory compromise with decreased forced vital capacity often occurs. Muscle biopsy shows a mix of myopathic features, including myofibrillar inclusions and sarcomeric disorganization; some patients have been reported to have dystrophic changes on muscle biopsy (O'Grady et al., 2016; Daimaguler et al., 2021). There is significant phenotypic variation, even in patients with the same mutation, which must be taken into account when counseling affecting individuals (Woods et al., 2020). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of myofibrillar myopathy, see MFM1 (601419). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934612
Concept ID:
C4310645
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Syndromic X-linked intellectual disability Raymond type

Raymond-type X-linked syndromic intellectual developmental disorder (MRXSR) is characterized by mildly to severely impaired intellectual development with speech and language difficulties associated with variable additional features, including marfanoid habitus, epilepsy, facial dysmorphism, hypotonia, and behavioral problems (summary by Baker et al., 2015 and Schirwani et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
477037
Concept ID:
C3275406
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Brachydactyly-elbow wrist dysplasia syndrome

Liebenberg syndrome is an upper limb malformation characterized by the combination of dysplastic elbow joints and the fusion of wrist bones with consequent radial deviation (summary by Spielmann et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
396103
Concept ID:
C1861313
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Neurodevelopmental, jaw, eye, and digital syndrome

Neurodevelopmental, jaw, eye, and digital syndrome (NEDJED) is characterized by phenotypic diversity, with patients exhibiting a range of overlapping phenotypes. Most patients show developmental delay ranging from mild to severe, and often have behavioral disorders as well. Brain imaging shows hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, prominence of lateral ventricles, and/or white matter abnormalities. Many patients have retro- or micrognathia, but mild prognathism has also been observed. Ocular anomalies are variably present, and may be severe and complex; however, some patients show only mild myopia. Abnormalities of fingers and toes include brachydactyly, clinodactyly, syndactyly, and contractures; polydactyly is rarely seen (Holt et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1712714
Concept ID:
C5394477
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Developmental delay with variable intellectual disability and dysmorphic facies

Developmental delay with variable intellectual disability and dysmorphic facies (DIDDF) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by neurologic deficits and characteristic dysmorphic facial features apparent from infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals usually show impaired intellectual development, speech delay, learning difficulties, and/or behavioral problems. Additional features may include hypotonia, hand or foot deformities, and palatal defects (Verberne et al., 2021; Verberne et al., 2022). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1824015
Concept ID:
C5774242
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hennekam-Beemer syndrome

A rare multiple congenital anomalies syndrome characterized by cutaneous mastocytosis, microcephaly, microtia and/or hearing loss, hypotonia and skeletal anomalies (e.g. clinodactyly, camptodactyly, scoliosis). Additional common features are short stature, intellectual disability and difficulties. Facial dysmorphism may include upslanted palpebral fissures, highly arched palate and micrognathia. Rarely, seizures and asymmetrically small feet have been reported. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
462843
Concept ID:
C3151493
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Microcephaly-cerebellar hypoplasia-cardiac conduction defect syndrome

The Zaki-Gleeson syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by profound mental retardation, severe microcephaly, poor growth, cerebellar hypoplasia, and second-degree cardiac conduction defects (Zaki et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482322
Concept ID:
C3280692
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Intellectual developmental disorder, autosomal dominant 68

Autosomal dominant intellectual developmental disorder-68 (MRD68) is characterized by developmental delay/intellectual disability, microcephaly, poor growth, feeding difficulties, and dysmorphic features. Some patients may have autism spectrum disorder or attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (Cif et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1802176
Concept ID:
C5677008
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
11.

Joubert syndrome 39

Joubert syndrome-39 (JBTS39) is an autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disorder with variable manifestations. Most affected individuals have developmental delay with poor speech and retinal dystrophy with abnormal eye movements. Brain imaging shows the pathognomonic 'molar tooth sign,' which reflects abnormal cerebellar formation (Van De Weghe et al., 2021). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Joubert syndrome, see JBTS1 (213300). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1794210
Concept ID:
C5562000
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Joint contracture of the 5th finger

Chronic loss of joint motion in the 5th finger due to structural changes in non-bony tissue. The term camptodactyly of the 5th finger is used if the distal and/or proximal interphalangeal joints are affected. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
356345
Concept ID:
C1865702
Anatomical Abnormality; Finding
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