U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 10

1.

Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy 2, autosomal dominant

Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is characterized by the clinical triad of: joint contractures that begin in early childhood; slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting initially in a humero-peroneal distribution that later extends to the scapular and pelvic girdle muscles; and cardiac involvement that may manifest as palpitations, presyncope and syncope, poor exercise tolerance, and congestive heart failure along with variable cardiac rhythm disturbances. Age of onset, severity, and progression of muscle and cardiac involvement demonstrate both inter- and intrafamilial variability. Clinical variability ranges from early onset with severe presentation in childhood to late onset with slow progression in adulthood. In general, joint contractures appear during the first two decades, followed by muscle weakness and wasting. Cardiac involvement usually occurs after the second decade and respiratory function may be impaired in some individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98048
Concept ID:
C0410190
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-3 (LGMDR3) affects mainly the proximal muscles and results in difficulty walking. Most individuals have onset in childhood; the disorder is progressive. Other features may include scapular winging, calf pseudohypertrophy, and contractures. Cardiomyopathy has rarely been reported (summary by Babameto-Laku et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
424706
Concept ID:
C2936332
Disease or Syndrome
3.

DPM3-congenital disorder of glycosylation

Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type C15 (MDDGC15) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive proximal muscle weakness, manifest initially as unsteady gait, but later including more distal muscles, and dilated cardiomyopathy. The age at onset varies widely from the first decade to adulthood; those with earlier onset may have delayed motor development. Laboratory studies show increased serum creatine kinase and muscle biopsy shows dystrophic features with decreased alpha-dystroglycan (DAG1; 128239). Biochemical studies often show evidence of abnormal N-glycosylation of serum proteins, consistent with a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG) (summary by Svahn et al., 2019). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy- dystroglycanopathy type C, see MDDGC1 (609308). For a discussion of the classification of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
414534
Concept ID:
C2752007
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type R18

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-18 (LGMD18) is characterized by childhood-onset of proximal muscle weakness resulting in gait abnormalities and scapular winging. Serum creatine kinase is increased. A subset of patients may show a hyperkinetic movement disorder with chorea, ataxia, or dystonia and global developmental delay (summary by Bogershausen et al., 2013). Additional more variable features include alacrima, achalasia, cataracts, or hepatic steatosis (Liang et al., 2015; Koehler et al., 2017). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDR1 (253600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1385598
Concept ID:
C4517996
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1G

Autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-3 (LGMDD3) is characterized by slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness affecting the upper and lower limbs. Onset is usually in adulthood, but can occur during the teenage years. Affected individuals may also develop cataracts before age 50 (summary by Vieira et al., 2014). For a phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, see LGMDD1 (603511). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
322993
Concept ID:
C1836765
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2U

A rare subtype of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy disorder with characteristics of infantile to childhood-onset of slowly progressive, principally proximal shoulder and/or pelvic-girdle muscular weakness that typically presents with positive Gowers'' sign and is associated with elevated creatine kinase levels, hyporeflexia, joint and achilles tendon contractures and muscle hypertrophy usually of the thighs, calves and/or tongue. Other highly variable features include cerebellar, cardiac and ocular abnormalities. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
1683417
Concept ID:
C5190987
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Inclusion body myopathy with early-onset Paget disease with or without frontotemporal dementia 3

Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone (PDB) and/or frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) is characterized by adult-onset proximal and distal muscle weakness (clinically resembling a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy syndrome), early-onset PDB, and premature frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Muscle weakness progresses to involve other limb and respiratory muscles. PDB involves focal areas of increased bone turnover that typically lead to spine and/or hip pain and localized enlargement and deformity of the long bones; pathologic fractures occur on occasion. Early stages of FTD are characterized by dysnomia, dyscalculia, comprehension deficits, and paraphasic errors, with minimal impairment of episodic memory; later stages are characterized by inability to speak, auditory comprehension deficits for even one-step commands, alexia, and agraphia. Mean age at diagnosis for muscle disease and PDB is 42 years; for FTD, 56 years. Dilated cardiomyopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson disease are now known to be part of the spectrum of findings associated with IBMPFD. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
815799
Concept ID:
C3809469
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2R1

Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-21 (LGMDR21) is characterized by progressive limb-girdle weakness with age of onset ranging from congenital to adult. Muscle imaging shows a specific and selective pattern of fatty muscle degeneration (summary by Servian-Morilla et al., 2020). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive LGMD, see LGMDR1 (253600). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934627
Concept ID:
C4310660
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Muscular dystrophy, Hemizygous lethal type

MedGen UID:
326552
Concept ID:
C1839671
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy is a term for a group of diseases that cause weakness and wasting of the muscles in the arms and legs. The muscles most affected are those closest to the body (proximal muscles), specifically the muscles of the shoulders, upper arms, pelvic area, and thighs.

The severity, age of onset, and features of limb-girdle muscle dystrophy vary among the many subtypes of this condition and may be inconsistent even within the same family. Signs and symptoms may first appear at any age and generally worsen with time, although in some cases they remain mild.

In the early stages of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, affected individuals may have an unusual walking gait, such as waddling or walking on the balls of their feet, and may also have difficulty running. They may need to use their arms to press themselves up from a squatting position because of their weak thigh muscles. As the condition progresses, people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy may eventually require wheelchair assistance.

Muscle wasting may cause changes in posture or in the appearance of the shoulder, back, and arm. In particular, weak shoulder muscles tend to make the shoulder blades (scapulae) "stick out" from the back, a sign known as scapular winging. Affected individuals may also have an abnormally curved lower back (lordosis) or a spine that curves to the side (scoliosis). Some develop joint stiffness (contractures) that can restrict movement in their hips, knees, ankles, or elbows. Overgrowth (hypertrophy) of the calf muscles occurs in some people with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

Weakening of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) occurs in some forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Some affected individuals experience mild to severe breathing problems related to the weakness of muscles needed for breathing. In some cases, the breathing problems are severe enough that affected individuals need to use a machine to help them breathe (mechanical ventilation).

Intelligence is generally unaffected in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy; however, developmental delay and intellectual disability have been reported in rare forms of the disorder. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
151940
Concept ID:
C0686353
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...