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Items: 13

1.

Familial adenomatous polyposis 1

APC-associated polyposis conditions include (classic or attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS). FAP is a colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition syndrome that can manifest in either classic or attenuated form. Classic FAP is characterized by hundreds to thousands of adenomatous colonic polyps, beginning on average at age 16 years (range 7-36 years). For those with the classic form of FAP, 95% of individuals have polyps by age 35 years; CRC is inevitable without colectomy. The mean age of CRC diagnosis in untreated individuals is 39 years (range 34-43 years). The attenuated form is characterized by multiple colonic polyps (average of 30), more proximally located polyps, and a diagnosis of CRC at a later age than in classic FAP. For those with an attenuated form, there is a 70% lifetime risk of CRC and the mean age of diagnosis is 50-55 years. Extracolonic manifestations are variably present and include polyps of the stomach and duodenum, osteomas, dental abnormalities, congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (CHRPE), benign cutaneous lesions, desmoid tumors, adrenal masses, and other associated cancers. GAPPS is characterized by proximal gastric polyposis, increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, and no duodenal or colonic involvement in most individuals reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
398651
Concept ID:
C2713442
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Disorganization, mouse, homolog of

MedGen UID:
387773
Concept ID:
C1857230
Finding
3.

Proteus syndrome

Proteus syndrome is characterized by progressive segmental or patchy overgrowth most commonly affecting the skeleton, skin, adipose, and central nervous systems. In most individuals Proteus syndrome has modest or no manifestations at birth, develops and progresses rapidly beginning in the toddler period, and relentlessly progresses through childhood, causing severe overgrowth and disfigurement. It is associated with a range of tumors, pulmonary complications, and a striking predisposition to deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
39008
Concept ID:
C0085261
Neoplastic Process
4.

Neural tube defect

Neural tube defects are the second most common type of birth defect after congenital heart defects. The 2 most common NTDs are open spina bifida, also known as spina bifida cystica (SBC) or myelomeningocele, and anencephaly (see 206500) (Detrait et al., 2005). Spina bifida occulta (SBO), a bony defect of the spine covered by normal skin, is a mild form of spina bifida that is often asymptomatic. The term 'spinal dysraphia' refers to both SBC and SBO (Botto et al., 1999; Fineman et al., 1982). The most severe neural tube defect, craniorachischisis (CRN), leaves the neural tube open from the midbrain or rostral hindbrain to the base of the spine (summary by Robinson et al., 2012). Neural tube defects represent a complex trait with multifactorial etiology encompassing both genetic and environmental components (summary by Bartsch et al., 2012 and Lei et al., 2014). An X-linked form of spina bifida has been suggested; see 301410. See also folate-sensitive neural tube defects (601634), which are caused by genes involved in folate metabolism. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
18009
Concept ID:
C0027794
Congenital Abnormality
5.

Legius syndrome

Legius syndrome is characterized by multiple café au lait macules without neurofibromas or other tumor manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Additional clinical manifestations reported commonly include intertriginous freckling, lipomas, macrocephaly, and learning disabilities / attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) / developmental delays. Current knowledge of the natural history of Legius syndrome is based on the clinical manifestations of fewer than 300 individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis; better delineation of the clinical manifestations and natural history of Legius syndrome will likely occur as more affected individuals are identified. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
370709
Concept ID:
C1969623
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia 3

Any familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia in which the cause of the disease is a mutation in the AP2S1 gene. [from MONDO]

MedGen UID:
322173
Concept ID:
C1833372
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia 2

Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type II (HHC2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by lifelong elevations of serum calcium concentrations with low urinary calcium excretion and normal circulating parathyroid hormone concentrations in most patients. Patients are generally asymptomatic (summary by Nesbit et al., 2013). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, see HHC1 (145980). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
374447
Concept ID:
C1840347
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Scalp-ear-nipple syndrome

Scalp-ear-nipple syndrome is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp, breast anomalies that range from hypothelia or athelia to amastia, and minor anomalies of the external ears. Less frequent clinical characteristics include nail dystrophy, dental anomalies, cutaneous syndactyly of the digits, and renal malformations. Penetrance appears to be high, although there is substantial variable expressivity within families (Marneros et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
357183
Concept ID:
C1867020
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Multiple symmetric lipomatosis

Multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder characterized by the growth of unencapsulated masses of adipose tissue with predilection for the cervical and thoracic regions. The lipoma growth is striking and disfiguring, and growth around the neck may cause difficulty swallowing or breathing. The age at onset ranges from childhood to young adulthood. Most, but not all, patients develop axonal peripheral neuropathy, which can appear at any age and varies in severity. Laboratory studies in MSL show low leptin (164160), low adiponectin (605441), variably increased lactate, and increased FGF21 (609436). Some patients may have insulin resistance. The disorder is exclusively associated with a particular MFN2 mutation (R707W; 608507.0013), usually in the homozygous state, but sometimes in the compound heterozygous state (Rocha et al., 2017; Capel et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
7349
Concept ID:
C0023804
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Familial multiple lipomatosis

Familial multiple lipomatosis (FML) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by numerous encapsulated lipomas on the trunk and extremities (Keskin et al., 2002). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
698553
Concept ID:
C1275273
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Mitochondrial myopathy-cerebellar ataxia-pigmentary retinopathy syndrome

Mitochondrial myopathy and ataxia (MMYAT) is an autosomal recessive mtDNA depletion disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia, congenital muscle involvement with histologic findings ranging from myopathic to dystrophic, and pigmentary retinopathy (summary by Donkervoort et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1620960
Concept ID:
C4540096
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome 2

Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome-2 (BHD2) is characterized by lipomatosis and fibrofolliculomas as well as renal cell carcinoma and other cancers (van de Beek et al., 2023). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of BHD, see BHD1 (135150). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1841312
Concept ID:
C5830676
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Multiple lipomas

The presence of multiple lipomas (a type of benign tissue made of fatty tissue). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
677074
Concept ID:
C0745730
Finding; Neoplastic Process
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