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Items: 5

1.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex, Ogna type

Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes, manifested by blistering with little or no trauma; congenital pyloric atresia; and ureteral and renal anomalies (dysplastic/multicystic kidney, hydronephrosis/hydroureter, ureterocele, duplicated renal collecting system, absent bladder). The course of EB-PA is usually severe and often lethal in the neonatal period. Most affected children succumb as neonates; those who survive may have severe blistering with formation of granulation tissue on the skin around the mouth, nose, fingers, and toes, and internally around the trachea. However, some affected individuals have little or no blistering later in life. Additional features shared by EB-PA and the other major forms of EB include congenital localized absence of skin (aplasia cutis congenita) affecting the extremities and/or head, milia, nail dystrophy, scarring alopecia, hypotrichosis, contractures, and dilated cardiomyopathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98488
Concept ID:
C0432317
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Pachyonychia congenita 3

Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is characterized by hypertrophic nail dystrophy, painful palmoplantar keratoderma and blistering, oral leukokeratosis, pilosebaceous cysts (including steatocystoma and vellus hair cysts), palmoplantar hyperhydrosis, and follicular keratoses on the trunk and extremities. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
811523
Concept ID:
C3714948
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex 6, generalized, with scarring and hair loss

Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is characterized by fragility of the skin (and mucosal epithelia in some instances) that results in non-scarring blisters and erosions caused by minor mechanical trauma. EBS is distinguished from other types of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) or non-EB skin fragility syndromes by the location of the blistering in relation to the dermal-epidermal junction. In EBS, blistering occurs within basal keratinocytes. The severity of blistering ranges from limited to hands and feet to widespread involvement. Additional features can include hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles (keratoderma), nail dystrophy, milia, and hyper- and/or hypopigmentation. Rare EBS subtypes have been associated with additional clinical features including pyloric atresia, muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, and/or nephropathy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
934598
Concept ID:
C4310631
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Ectodermal dysplasia with intellectual disability and syndactyly

MedGen UID:
322135
Concept ID:
C1833169
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Onychogryposis of toenails

Thickened toenails. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
870241
Concept ID:
C4024679
Anatomical Abnormality
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