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1.

Hereditary factor VIII deficiency disease

Hemophilia A is characterized by deficiency in factor VIII clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor VIII clotting activity. Individuals with severe hemophilia A are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life following oral or soft tissue bleeding either with procedures or due to a known family history of hemophilia. Without prophylactic treatment, individuals may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month including spontaneous joint bleeds or deep-muscle hematomas, and prolonged bleeding or excessive pain and swelling from minor injuries, surgery, and tooth extractions. Individuals with moderate hemophilia A seldom have spontaneous bleeding, although it varies between individuals; however, they do have prolonged or delayed bleeding after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies, usually from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia A do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and postoperative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies widely, typically from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia A are often not diagnosed until later in life. Approximately 30% of heterozygous females have factor VIII clotting activity below 40% and are at risk for bleeding (even if males in the family are only mildly affected). After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity. In addition, 25% of heterozygous females with normal factor VIII clotting activity report an increased bleeding tendency. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
5501
Concept ID:
C0019069
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hereditary factor IX deficiency disease

Hemophilia B is characterized by deficiency in factor IX clotting activity that results in prolonged oozing after injuries, tooth extractions, or surgery, and delayed or recurrent bleeding prior to complete wound healing. The age of diagnosis and frequency of bleeding episodes are related to the level of factor IX clotting activity. In individuals with severe hemophilia B, spontaneous joint or deep-muscle bleeding is the most frequent sign. Individuals with severe hemophilia B are usually diagnosed during the first two years of life; without prophylactic treatment, they may average up to two to five spontaneous bleeding episodes each month. Individuals with moderate hemophilia B seldom have spontaneous bleeding; however, they do have prolonged or delayed oozing after relatively minor trauma and are usually diagnosed before age five to six years; the frequency of bleeding episodes varies from once a month to once a year. Individuals with mild hemophilia B do not have spontaneous bleeding episodes; however, without pre- and postoperative treatment, abnormal bleeding occurs with surgery or tooth extractions; the frequency of bleeding may vary from once a year to once every ten years. Individuals with mild hemophilia B are often not diagnosed until later in life. In any individual with hemophilia B, bleeding episodes may be more frequent in childhood and adolescence than in adulthood. Approximately 30% of heterozygous females have factor IX clotting activity lower than 40% and are at risk for bleeding (even if the affected family member has mild hemophilia B), although symptoms are usually mild. After major trauma or invasive procedures, prolonged or excessive bleeding usually occurs, regardless of severity. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
945
Concept ID:
C0008533
Disease or Syndrome
3.

von Willebrand disease type 1

Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
220393
Concept ID:
C1264039
Disease or Syndrome
4.

von Willebrand disease type 3

Von Willebrand disease (VWD), a congenital bleeding disorder caused by deficient or defective plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF), may only become apparent on hemostatic challenge, and bleeding history may become more apparent with increasing age. Recent guidelines on VWD have recommended taking a VWF level of 30 or 40 IU/dL as a cutoff for those diagnosed with the disorder. Individuals with VWF levels greater than 30 IU/dL and lower than 50 IU/dL can be described as having a risk factor for bleeding. This change in guidelines significantly alters the proportion of individuals with each disease type. Type 1 VWD (~30% of VWD) typically manifests as mild mucocutaneous bleeding. Type 2 VWD accounts for approximately 60% of VWD. Type 2 subtypes include: Type 2A, which usually manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2B, which typically manifests as mild-to-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding that can include thrombocytopenia that worsens in certain circumstances; Type 2M, which typically manifests as mild-moderate mucocutaneous bleeding; Type 2N, which can manifest as excessive bleeding with surgery and mimics mild hemophilia A. Type 3 VWD (<10% of VWD) manifests with severe mucocutaneous and musculoskeletal bleeding. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
266075
Concept ID:
C1264041
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 7

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, and, in some individuals, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. Ocular findings include reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in variable bruising, epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects occur primarily in individuals with pathogenic variants in AP3B1 and AP3D1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
481386
Concept ID:
C3279756
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Congenital afibrinogenemia

Inherited disorders of fibrinogen affect either the quantity (afibrinogenemia and hypofibrinogenemia; 202400) or the quality (dysfibrinogenemia; 616004) of the circulating fibrinogen or both (hypodysfibrinogenemia; see 616004). Afibrinogenemia is characterized by the complete absence of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Bleeding due to afibrinogenemia usually manifests in the neonatal period, with 85% of cases presenting umbilical cord bleeding, but a later age of onst is not unusual. Bleeding may occur in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or the central nervous system, with intracranial hemorrhage being reported as the major cause of death. Patients are susceptible to spontaneous rupture of the spleen. Menstruating women may experience menometrorrhagia. First-trimester abortion is common. Both arterial and venous thromboembolic complications have been reported (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). Hypofibrinogenemia is characterized by reduced amounts of immunoreactive fibrinogen. Patients are often heterozygous carriers of afibrinogenemia mutations and are usually asymptomatic. However, they may bleed when exposed to trauma or if they have a second associated hemostatic abnormality. Women may experience miscarriages. Liver disease occurs in rare cases (summary by de Moerloose and Neerman-Arbez, 2009). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
749036
Concept ID:
C2584774
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Factor XIII, A subunit, deficiency of

Factor XIII deficiency is an autosomal recessive hematologic disorder characterized by increased bleeding and poor wound healing. Most cases of congenital factor XIII deficiency result from mutation in the A subunit (Kangsadalampai et al., 1999). Ichinose et al. (1996, 2000) proposed a classification of factor XIII deficiency: XIIIA deficiency (formerly 'type II' F13 deficiency) and XIIIB deficiency (formerly 'type I' F13 deficiency), as well as a possible combined deficiency of the 2. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
442497
Concept ID:
C2750514
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Thrombocytopenia, X-linked, with or without dyserythropoietic anemia

GATA1-related cytopenia is characterized by thrombocytopenia and/or anemia ranging from mild to severe. One or more of the following may also be present: platelet dysfunction, mild ß-thalassemia, neutropenia, and congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) in males. Thrombocytopenia typically presents in infancy as a bleeding disorder with easy bruising and mucosal bleeding (e.g., epistaxis). Anemia ranges from minimal (mild dyserythropoiesis) to severe (hydrops fetalis requiring in utero transfusion). At the extreme end of the clinical spectrum, severe hemorrhage and/or erythrocyte transfusion dependence are life long; at the milder end, anemia and the risk for bleeding may decrease spontaneously with age. Heterozygous females may have mild-to-moderate symptoms such as menorrhagia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
763703
Concept ID:
C3550789
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Platelet-type bleeding disorder 8

Platelet-type bleeding disorder-8 (BDPLT8) is an autosomal recessive condition characterized by mild to moderate mucocutaneous bleeding and excessive bleeding after surgery or trauma. The defect is due to the inability of ADP to induce platelet aggregation (review by Cattaneo, 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
344008
Concept ID:
C1853278
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Factor 5 and Factor VIII, combined deficiency of, 2

Combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII type 2 (F5F8D2) is characterized by bleeding symptoms similar to those in hemophilia (306700) or parahemophilia (227400), caused by single deficiency of FV (612309) or FVIII (300841), respectively. The most common symptoms are epistaxis, menorrhagia, and excessive bleeding during or after trauma. Plasma FV and FVIII antigen and activity levels are in the range of 5 to 30%. Inheritance of F5F8D2 is autosomal recessive and distinct from the coinheritance of FV deficiency and FVIII deficiency (summary by Zhang and Ginsburg, 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of F5F8D, see 227300. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462239
Concept ID:
C3150889
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Alpha-2-plasmin inhibitor deficiency

Alpha-2-plasmin inhibitor deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive hemorrhagic diathesis. Most bleeds are severe, appear during childhood, and, in a few cases, umbilical bleeding is the first manifestation. Some homozygous patients present only moderate bleeding (Favier et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
414178
Concept ID:
C2752081
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Persistent bleeding after trauma

MedGen UID:
375403
Concept ID:
C1844374
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