U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Search results

Items: 13

1.

Trichothiodystrophy 1, photosensitive

About half of all people with trichothiodystrophy have a photosensitive form of the disorder, which causes them to be extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. They develop a severe sunburn after spending just a few minutes in the sun. However, for reasons that are unclear, they do not develop other sun-related problems such as excessive freckling of the skin or an increased risk of skin cancer. Many people with trichothiodystrophy report that they do not sweat.

Intellectual disability and delayed development are common in people with trichothiodystrophy, although most affected individuals are highly social with an outgoing and engaging personality. Some people with trichothiodystrophy have brain abnormalities that can be seen with imaging tests. A common neurological feature of this disorder is impaired myelin production (dysmyelination). Myelin is a fatty substance that insulates nerve cells and promotes the rapid transmission of nerve impulses.

Mothers of children with trichothiodystrophy may experience problems during pregnancy including pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia) and a related condition called HELLP syndrome that can damage the liver. Babies with trichothiodystrophy are at increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, and slow growth. Most children with trichothiodystrophy have short stature compared to others their age. 

Trichothiodystrophy is also associated with recurrent infections, particularly respiratory infections, which can be life-threatening. People with trichothiodystrophy may have abnormal red blood cells, including red blood cells that are smaller than normal. They may also have elevated levels of a type of hemoglobin called A2, which is a protein found in red blood cells. Other features of trichothiodystrophy can include dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis); abnormalities of the fingernails and toenails; clouding of the lens in both eyes from birth (congenital cataracts); poor coordination; and skeletal abnormalities including degeneration of both hips at an early age.

The signs and symptoms of trichothiodystrophy vary widely. Mild cases may involve only the hair. More severe cases also cause delayed development, significant intellectual disability, and recurrent infections; severely affected individuals may survive only into infancy or early childhood.

In people with trichothiodystrophy, tests show that the hair is lacking sulfur-containing proteins that normally gives hair its strength. A cross section of a cut hair shows alternating light and dark banding that has been described as a "tiger tail."

Trichothiodystrophy, commonly called TTD, is a rare inherited condition that affects many parts of the body. The hallmark of this condition is hair that is sparse and easily broken.  [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
355730
Concept ID:
C1866504
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Cutis laxa, X-linked

Occipital horn syndrome (OHS) is a rare connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperelastic and bruisable skin, hernias, bladder diverticula, hyperextensible joints, varicosities, and multiple skeletal abnormalities. The disorder is sometimes accompanied by mild neurologic impairment, and bony abnormalities of the occiput are a common feature, giving rise to the name (summary by Das et al., 1995). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82793
Concept ID:
C0268353
Congenital Abnormality
3.

Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome

The TP63-related disorders comprise six overlapping phenotypes: Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome (which includes Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome). Acro-dermo-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip/palate syndrome 3 (EEC3). Limb-mammary syndrome. Split-hand/foot malformation type 4 (SHFM4). Isolated cleft lip/cleft palate (orofacial cleft 8). Individuals typically have varying combinations of ectodermal dysplasia (hypohidrosis, nail dysplasia, sparse hair, tooth abnormalities), cleft lip/palate, split-hand/foot malformation/syndactyly, lacrimal duct obstruction, hypopigmentation, hypoplastic breasts and/or nipples, and hypospadias. Findings associated with a single phenotype include ankyloblepharon filiforme adnatum (tissue strands that completely or partially fuse the upper and lower eyelids), skin erosions especially on the scalp associated with areas of scarring, and alopecia, trismus, and excessive freckling. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
98032
Concept ID:
C0406709
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Pili torti-deafness syndrome

Bjornstad syndrome (BJS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pili torti. The hearing loss is congenital and of variable severity. Pili torti (twisted hairs), a condition in which the hair shafts are flattened at irregular intervals and twisted 180 degrees from the normal axis, making the hair very brittle, is usually recognized early in childhood (Selvaag, 2000). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82728
Concept ID:
C0266006
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Pili torti

Pili (from Latin pilus, hair) torti (from Latin tortus, twisted) refers to short and brittle hairs that appear flattened and twisted when viewed through a microscope. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
82670
Concept ID:
C0263491
Finding; Finding
6.

Cleft lip/palate-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome

Zlotogora-Ogur syndrome is an ectodermal dysplasia syndrome with characteristics of hair, skin and teeth anomalies, facial dysmorphism with cleft lip and palate, cutaneous syndactyly and, in some cases, intellectual disability.The prevalence is unknown but to date, less than 50 cases have been described in the literature. Caused by mutations in the gene PVRL1 (11q23-q24) which encodes nectin-1, the principal receptor used by alpha-herpesviruses to mediate entry into human cells. Transmission is autosomal recessive. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
444067
Concept ID:
C2931488
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hypotrichosis 6

Hypotrichosis-6 (HYPT6) is a localized autosomal recessive hypotrichosis characterized by fragile hairs that break easily, leaving short, sparse scalp hairs. The disorder affects the trunk and extremities as well as the scalp, and the eyebrows and eyelashes may also be involved, whereas beard, pubic, and axillary hairs are largely spared. In addition, patients can develop hyperkeratotic follicular papules, erythema, and pruritus in affected areas. In some patients with congenital hypotrichosis, monilethrix-like hairs showing elliptical nodes have been observed (summary by Schaffer et al., 2006). Genetic Heterogeneity of Autosomal Recessive Localized Hypotrichosis LAH2 (HYPT7; 604379) is caused by mutation in the LIPH gene (607365) on chromosome 3q27, and LAH3 (HYPT8; 278150) is caused by mutation in the LPAR6 (P2RY5) gene (609239) on chromosome 13q14.12-q14.2. See also hypotrichosis and recurrent skin vesicles (613102), which is caused by mutation in the DSC3 gene (600271). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335812
Concept ID:
C1842839
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Congenital hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy

Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular degeneration (HJMD) is a very rare syndrome characterized by sparse and short hair from birth followed by progressive macular degeneration leading to blindness. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
316921
Concept ID:
C1832162
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis 11

Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of keratinization characterized primarily by abnormal skin scaling over the whole body. These disorders are limited to skin, with approximately two-thirds of patients presenting severe symptoms. The main skin phenotypes are lamellar ichthyosis (LI) and nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE), although phenotypic overlap within the same patient or among patients from the same family can occur (summary by Fischer, 2009). Neither histopathologic findings nor ultrastructural features clearly distinguish between NCIE and LI. In addition, mutations in several genes have been shown to cause both lamellar and nonbullous ichthyosiform erythrodermal phenotypes (Akiyama et al., 2003). At the First Ichthyosis Consensus Conference in Soreze in 2009, the term 'autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis' (ARCI) was designated to encompass LI, NCIE, and harlequin ichthyosis (ARCI4B; 242500) (Oji et al., 2010). NCIE is characterized by prominent erythroderma and fine white, superficial, semiadherent scales. Most patients present with collodion membrane at birth and have palmoplantar keratoderma, often with painful fissures, digital contractures, and loss of pulp volume. In half of the cases, a nail dystrophy including ridging, subungual hyperkeratosis, or hypoplasia has been described. Ectropion, eclabium, scalp involvement, and loss of eyebrows and lashes seem to be more frequent in NCIE than in lamellar ichthyosis (summary by Fischer et al., 2000). In LI, the scales are large, adherent, dark, and pigmented with no skin erythema. Overlapping phenotypes may depend on the age of the patient and the region of the body. The terminal differentiation of the epidermis is perturbed in both forms, leading to reduced barrier function and defects of lipid composition in the stratum corneum (summary by Lefevre et al., 2006). In later life, the skin in ARCI may have scales that cover the entire body surface, including the flexural folds, and the scales are highly variable in size and color. Erythema may be very mild and almost invisible. Some affected persons exhibit scarring alopecia, and many have secondary anhidrosis (summary by Eckl et al., 2005). For a general phenotypic description and discussion of genetic heterogeneity of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, see ARCI1 (242300). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
332073
Concept ID:
C1835851
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Follicular atrophoderma and basal cell epitheliomata

Bazex-Dupre-Christol syndrome (BDCS) is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by a triad of congenital hypotrichosis, follicular atrophoderma affecting the dorsa of the hands and feet, the face, and extensor surfaces of the elbows or knees, and the development of basal cell neoplasms, including basal cell nevi and basal cell carcinomas from the second decade onward (Yung and Newton-Bishop, 2005). Rombo syndrome (180730) has similar features, but shows autosomal dominant inheritance. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
87539
Concept ID:
C0346104
Neoplastic Process
11.

Ectodermal dysplasia-syndactyly syndrome 1

Ectodermal dysplasia-syndactyly syndrome (EDSS) is characterized by sparse to absent scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes, hypoplastic nails, tooth enamel hypoplasia, conical-shaped teeth, palmoplantar keratoderma, and partial cutaneous syndactyly (summary by Raza et al., 2015). Genetic Heterogeneity of Ectodermal Dysplasia-Syndactyly Syndrome Ectodermal dysplasia-syndactyly syndrome-2 (EDSS2; 613576) maps to chromosome 7p21-p14. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462157
Concept ID:
C3150807
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Pili torti-developmental delay-neurological abnormalities syndrome

Abnormal hair, joint laxity, and developmental delay (HJDD) is characterized by normal hair at birth that gradually becomes sparse, twisted, brittle, and easily broken, with pili torti and trichorrhexis nodosa observed on light microscopy. Other features include increased joint mobility and cognitive delay (Sharma et al., 2019). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
342358
Concept ID:
C1849811
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia

Pure hair and nail ectodermal dysplasia is characterised by the association of onychodystrophy and severe hypotrichosis, which is mainly limited to the scalp but may also affect the eyelashes and eyebrows. Less than 20 cases have been reported so far. The mode of transmission is autosomal dominant. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
400883
Concept ID:
C1865951
Disease or Syndrome
Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Search details

See more...

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...