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Items: 14

1.

Anemia, nonspherocytic hemolytic, due to G6PD deficiency

G6PD deficiency is the most common genetic cause of chronic and drug-, food-, or infection-induced hemolytic anemia. G6PD catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is the only NADPH-generation process in mature red cells; therefore, defense against oxidative damage is dependent on G6PD. Most G6PD-deficient patients are asymptomatic throughout their life, but G6PD deficiency can be life-threatening. The most common clinical manifestations of G6PD deficiency are neonatal jaundice and acute hemolytic anemia, which in most patients is triggered by an exogenous agent, e.g., primaquine or fava beans. Acute hemolysis is characterized by fatigue, back pain, anemia, and jaundice. Increased unconjugated bilirubin, lactate dehydrogenase, and reticulocytosis are markers of the disorder. The striking similarity between the areas where G6PD deficiency is common and Plasmodium falciparum malaria (see 611162) is endemic provided evidence that G6PD deficiency confers resistance against malaria (summary by Cappellini and Fiorelli, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
403555
Concept ID:
C2720289
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Thrombocytopenia, X-linked, with or without dyserythropoietic anemia

GATA1-related cytopenia is characterized by thrombocytopenia and/or anemia ranging from mild to severe. One or more of the following may also be present: platelet dysfunction, mild ß-thalassemia, neutropenia, and congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) in males. Thrombocytopenia typically presents in infancy as a bleeding disorder with easy bruising and mucosal bleeding (e.g., epistaxis). Anemia ranges from minimal (mild dyserythropoiesis) to severe (hydrops fetalis requiring in utero transfusion). At the extreme end of the clinical spectrum, severe hemorrhage and/or erythrocyte transfusion dependence are life long; at the milder end, anemia and the risk for bleeding may decrease spontaneously with age. Heterozygous females may have mild-to-moderate symptoms such as menorrhagia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
763703
Concept ID:
C3550789
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Orotic aciduria

Orotic aciduria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by megaloblastic anemia and orotic acid crystalluria that is frequently associated with some degree of physical and mental retardation. These features respond to appropriate pyrimidine replacement therapy, and most cases appear to have a good prognosis. A minority of cases have additional features, particularly congenital malformations and immune deficiencies, which may adversely affect this prognosis (summary by Webster et al., 2001). Bailey (2009) stated that only 2 cases of orotic aciduria without megaloblastic anemia (OAWA) had been reported. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
78642
Concept ID:
C0268128
Finding; Finding
4.

X-linked dyserythropoetic anemia with abnormal platelets and neutropenia

XLANP is an X-linked recessive hematologic disorder characterized by early-onset anemia and bone marrow erythroid hypoplasia with variable neutropenia. Some patients may have low platelets or platelet abnormalities. The severity is variable. Some patients have shown a favorable response to corticosteroid treatment (summary by Hollanda et al., 2006 and Sankaran et al., 2012). In some cases, the disorder may resemble Diamond-Blackfan anemia (see, e.g., DBA1; 105650) (Sankaran et al., 2012; Parrella et al., 2014; Klar et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
763770
Concept ID:
C3550856
Disease or Syndrome
5.

X-linked sideroblastic anemia with ataxia

X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by a blood disorder called sideroblastic anemia and movement problems known as ataxia. This condition occurs only in males.

Sideroblastic anemia results when developing red blood cells called erythroblasts do not make enough hemoglobin, which is the protein that carries oxygen in the blood. People with X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia have mature red blood cells that are smaller than normal (microcytic) and appear pale (hypochromic) because of the shortage of hemoglobin. This disorder also leads to an abnormal accumulation of iron in red blood cells. The iron-loaded erythroblasts, which are present in bone marrow, are called ring sideroblasts. These abnormal cells give the condition its name. Unlike other forms of sideroblastic anemia, X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia does not cause a potentially dangerous buildup of iron in the body. The anemia is typically mild and usually does not cause any symptoms.

X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia causes problems with balance and coordination that appear early in life. The ataxia primarily affects the trunk, making it difficult to sit, stand, and walk unassisted. In addition to ataxia, people with this condition often have trouble coordinating movements that involve judging distance or scale (dysmetria) and find it difficult to make rapid, alternating movements (dysdiadochokinesis). Mild speech difficulties (dysarthria), tremor, and abnormal eye movements have also been reported in some affected individuals. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
335078
Concept ID:
C1845028
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 4

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type IV (CDAN4) is an autosomal dominant red blood cell disorder characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and hemolysis resulting in anemia. Circulating erythroblasts and erythroblasts in the bone marrow show various morphologic abnormalities. Affected individuals with CDAN4 also have increased levels of fetal hemoglobin (summary by Arnaud et al., 2010). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, see CDAN1 (224120). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462276
Concept ID:
C3150926
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type type 1B

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I (CDA I) is characterized by moderate-to-severe macrocytic anemia presenting occasionally in utero as severe anemia associated with hydrops fetalis but more commonly in neonates as hepatomegaly, early jaundice, and intrauterine growth restriction. Some individuals present in childhood or adulthood. After the neonatal period, most affected individuals have lifelong moderate anemia, usually accompanied by jaundice and splenomegaly. Secondary hemochromatosis develops with age as a result of increased iron absorption even in those who are not transfused. Distal limb anomalies occur in 4%-14% of affected individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
816515
Concept ID:
C3810185
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

Finberg et al. (2008) referred to this phenotype as iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) and reviewed the key features: a congenital hypochromic, microcytic anemia; a very low mean corpuscular erythrocyte volume; a low transferrin saturation; abnormal iron absorption characterized by no hematologic improvement following treatment with oral iron; and abnormal iron utilization characterized by a sluggish, incomplete response to parenteral iron. The authors noted that although urinary levels of hepcidin (606464) are typically undetectable in individuals with iron deficiency, in 5 individuals with IRIDA urinary hepcidin/creatinine ratios were within or above the normal range. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
39081
Concept ID:
C0085576
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Severe congenital hypochromic anemia with ringed sideroblasts

STEAP3/TSAP6-related sideroblastic anemia is a very rare severe non-syndromic hypochromic anemia, which is characterized by transfusion-dependent hypochromic, poorly regenerative anemia, iron overload, resembling non-syndromic sideroblastic anemia (see this term) except for increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
815250
Concept ID:
C3808920
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Retinitis pigmentosa and erythrocytic microcytosis

Features that occur less commonly in people with TRNT1 deficiency include hearing loss caused by abnormalities of the inner ear (sensorineural hearing loss), recurrent seizures (epilepsy), and problems with the kidneys or heart.

TRNT1 deficiency encompasses what was first thought to be two separate disorders, a severe disorder called sideroblastic anemia with B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD) and a milder disorder called retinitis pigmentosa with erythrocytic microcytosis (RPEM), each named for its most common features. SIFD begins in infancy, and affected individuals usually do not survive past childhood. RPEM, on the other hand, is recognized in early adulthood, and the microcytosis usually does not cause any health problems. However, it has since been recognized that some individuals have a combination of features that fall between these two ends of the severity spectrum. All of these cases are now considered part of TRNT1 deficiency.

Neurological problems are also frequent in TRNT1 deficiency. Many affected individuals have delayed development of speech and motor skills, such as sitting, standing, and walking, and some have low muscle tone (hypotonia).

Eye abnormalities, often involving the light-sensing tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), can occur in people with TRNT1 deficiency. Some of these individuals have a condition called retinitis pigmentosa, in which the light-sensing cells of the retina gradually deteriorate. Eye problems in TRNT1 deficiency can lead to vision loss.

In addition, many individuals with TRNT1 deficiency have recurrent fevers that are not caused by an infection. These fever episodes are often one of the earliest recognized symptoms of TRNT1 deficiency, usually beginning in infancy. The fever episodes are typically accompanied by poor feeding, vomiting, and diarrhea, and can lead to hospitalization. In many affected individuals, the episodes occur regularly, arising approximately every 2 to 4 weeks and lasting 5 to 7 days, although the frequency can decrease with age.

Many people with TRNT1 deficiency have an immune system disorder (immunodeficiency) that can lead to recurrent bacterial infections. Repeated infections can cause life-threatening damage to internal organs. The immunodeficiency is characterized by low numbers of immune system cells called B cells, which normally help fight infections by producing immune proteins called antibodies (or immunoglobulins). These proteins target foreign invaders such as bacteria and viruses and mark them for destruction. In many individuals with TRNT1 deficiency, the amount of immunoglobulins is also low (hypogammaglobulinemia).

A common feature of TRNT1 deficiency is a blood condition called sideroblastic anemia, which is characterized by a shortage of red blood cells (anemia). In TRNT1 deficiency, the red blood cells that are present are unusually small (erythrocytic microcytosis). In addition, developing red blood cells in the bone marrow (erythroblasts) can have an abnormal buildup of iron that appears as a ring of blue staining in the cell after treatment in the lab with certain dyes. These abnormal cells are called ring sideroblasts.

TRNT1 deficiency is a condition that affects many body systems. Its signs and symptoms can involve blood cells, the immune system, the eyes, and the nervous system. The severity of the signs and symptoms vary widely. [from MedlinePlus Genetics]

MedGen UID:
934743
Concept ID:
C4310776
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita 5

Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita-5 (AMC5) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe joint contractures apparent at birth. Affected individuals usually have hypertonia and abnormal movements suggestive of dystonia, as well as feeding and/or breathing difficulties. More variable features may include poor overall growth, strabismus, dysmorphic facies, and global developmental delay with impaired speech (summary by Kariminejad et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1731112
Concept ID:
C5436453
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Fibrosis, neurodegeneration, and cerebral angiomatosis

Fibrosis, neurodegeneration, and cerebral angiomatosis (FINCA) is characterized by severe progressive cerebropulmonary symptoms, resulting in death in infancy from respiratory failure. Features include malabsorption, progressive growth failure, recurrent infections, chronic hemolytic anemia, and transient liver dysfunction. Neuropathology shows increased angiomatosis-like leptomeningeal, cortical, and superficial white matter vascularization and congestion, vacuolar degeneration and myelin loss in white matter, as well as neuronal degeneration. Interstitial fibrosis and granuloma-like lesions are seen in the lungs, and there is hepatomegaly with steatosis and collagen accumulation (Uusimaa et al., 2018). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648312
Concept ID:
C4748939
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Dyserythropoiesis, congenital, with ultrastructurally normal erythroblast heterochromatin

The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are an uncommon and heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by increased ineffective erythropoiesis and, usually, dysplastic changes in erythroblasts. Originally, 3 types of CDA were recognized and designated CDA type I (224120), type II (224100), and type III (105600). Subsequently, a number of other types were described, as reviewed by Wickramasinghe (1997). The defining features of CDA type I are autosomal recessive inheritance, macrocytes in the peripheral blood, internuclear chromatin bridges connecting some almost completely separated erythroblasts, and an abnormal ultrastructural appearance (spongy or 'swiss-cheese' appearance) of the heterochromatin in a high proportion of the erythroblasts. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
813565
Concept ID:
C3807235
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Poikilocytosis

The presence of abnormally shaped erythrocytes. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
67451
Concept ID:
C0221281
Finding
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