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Items: 5

1.

4p partial monosomy syndrome

Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterized by pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, developmental disability of variable degree, characteristic craniofacial features ('Greek warrior helmet' appearance of the nose, high forehead, prominent glabella, hypertelorism, high-arched eyebrows, protruding eyes, epicanthal folds, short philtrum, distinct mouth with downturned corners, and micrognathia), and a seizure disorder (Battaglia et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
408255
Concept ID:
C1956097
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II

Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII), the most common form of microcephalic primordial dwarfism, is characterized by extreme short stature and microcephaly along with distinctive facial features. Associated features that differentiate it from other forms of primordial dwarfism and that may necessitate treatment include: abnormal dentition, a slender bone skeletal dysplasia with hip deformity and/or scoliosis, insulin resistance / diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, cardiac malformations, and global vascular disease. The latter includes neurovascular disease such as moyamoya vasculopathy and intracranial aneurysms (which can lead to strokes), coronary artery disease (which can lead to premature myocardial infarctions), and renal vascular disease. Hypertension, which is also common, can have multiple underlying causes given the complex comorbidities. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
96587
Concept ID:
C0432246
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Microcephalic osteodysplastic dysplasia, Saul-Wilson type

Saul-Wilson syndrome (SWS) is a skeletal dysplasia characterized by profound short stature, distinctive craniofacial features, short distal phalanges of fingers and toes, and often clubfoot. Early development (primarily speech and motor) is delayed; cognition is normal. Other findings can include hearing loss (conductive, sensorineural, and mixed), lamellar cataracts, and/or rod-cone retinal dystrophy. To date, 16 affected individuals have been reported. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
722057
Concept ID:
C1300285
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Angel-shaped phalango-epiphyseal dysplasia

A form of acromelic dysplasia with the distinctive radiological sign of angel-shaped middle phalanges, a typical metacarpophalangeal pattern profile (mainly affecting first metacarpals and middle phalanges of second, third and fifth digits which all appear short), epiphyseal changes in the hips and in some, abnormal dentition and delayed bone age. A rare disease with less than 20 cases reported in the literature, however, it is likely under diagnosed. Caused by mutations in the growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) gene, located on chromosome 20q11.2, encoding CDMP1 (cartilage derived morphogenetic protein). CDMP1 belongs to the TGF beta super family and plays a role in bone growth and joint morphogenesis. Transmitted as an autosomal dominant condition. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
366028
Concept ID:
C1739384
Congenital Abnormality
5.

Pseudoepiphyses of the metacarpals

A pseudoepiphysis is a secondary ossification center distinct from the normal epiphysis. The normal metacarpal epiphyses are located at the distal ends of the metacarpal bones. Accessory epiphyses (which are also known as pseudoepiphyses) can also occasionally be observed at the proximal ends of the metacarpals, usually involving the 2nd metacarpal bone. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
349766
Concept ID:
C1860253
Finding
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