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1.

Severe combined immunodeficiency, autosomal recessive, T cell-negative, B cell-negative, NK cell-negative, due to adenosine deaminase deficiency

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a systemic purine metabolic disorder that primarily affects lymphocyte development, viability, and function. The clinical phenotypic spectrum includes: Severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), often diagnosed by age six months and usually by age 12 months; Less severe "delayed" onset combined immune deficiency (CID), usually diagnosed between age one and ten years; "Late/adult onset" CID, diagnosed in the second to fourth decades; Benign "partial ADA deficiency" (very low or absent ADA activity in erythrocytes but greater ADA activity in nucleated cells), which is compatible with normal immune function. Infants with typical early-onset ADA-deficient SCID have failure to thrive and opportunistic infections associated with marked depletion of T, B, and NK lymphocytes, and an absence of both humoral and cellular immune function. If immune function is not restored, children with ADA-deficient SCID rarely survive beyond age one to two years. Infections in delayed- and late-onset types (commonly, recurrent otitis, sinusitis, and upper respiratory) may initially be less severe than those in individuals with ADA-deficient SCID; however, by the time of diagnosis these individuals often have chronic pulmonary insufficiency and may have autoimmune phenomena (cytopenias, anti-thyroid antibodies), allergies, and elevated serum concentration of IgE. The longer the disorder goes unrecognized, the more immune function deteriorates and the more likely are chronic sequelae of recurrent infection. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
354935
Concept ID:
C1863236
Disease or Syndrome
2.

MHC class II deficiency

A rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by absence of HLA class II molecules on the surface of immune cells, leading to severely impaired cellular and humoral immune response to foreign antigens, severe CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. The disease clinically manifests with early onset of severe and recurrent infections mainly of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, protracted diarrhea with failure to thrive, and autoimmune disease, and is frequently fatal in childhood. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
444051
Concept ID:
C2931418
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Purine-nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency

Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder characterized mainly by decreased T-cell function. Some patients also have neurologic impairment (review by Aust et al., 1992). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75653
Concept ID:
C0268125
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Histiocytic medullary reticulosis

Omenn syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) associated with erythrodermia, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and alopecia. B cells are mostly absent, T-cell counts are normal to elevated, and T cells are frequently activated and express a restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire (summary by Ege et al., 2005). Another distinct form of familial histiocytic reticulocytosis (267700) is caused by mutation in the perforin-1 gene (PRF1; 170280) on chromosome 10q22. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
398130
Concept ID:
C2700553
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Monocytopenia with susceptibility to infections

This primary immunodeficiency, designated IMD21, DCML, or MONOMAC, is characterized by profoundly decreased or absent monocytes, B lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) lymphocytes, and circulating and tissue dendritic cells (DCs), with little or no effect on T-cell numbers. Clinical features of IMD21 are variable and include susceptibility to disseminated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, papillomavirus infections, opportunistic fungal infections, and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Bone marrow hypocellularity and dysplasia of myeloid, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages are present in most patients, as are karyotypic abnormalities, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8. In the absence of cytogenetic abnormalities or overt dysplasia, hypoplastic bone marrow may initially be diagnosed as aplastic anemia. Bone marrow transplantation is the only cure. Some patients may have an increased risk of miscarriage. Both autosomal dominant transmission and sporadic cases occur. Less common manifestations of GATA2 deficiency include lymphedema and sensorineural hearing loss, a phenotype usually termed 'Emberger syndrome' (614038) (summary by Bigley et al. (2011), Hsu et al. (2011), and Spinner et al. (2014)). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
481660
Concept ID:
C3280030
Disease or Syndrome
6.

X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection and neoplasia

XMEN is an X-linked recessive immunodeficiency characterized by CD4 (186940) lymphopenia, severe chronic viral infections, and defective T-lymphocyte activation (Li et al., 2011). Affected individuals have chronic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and are susceptible to the development of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Magnesium supplementation may be therapeutic (summary by Li et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
477076
Concept ID:
C3275445
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Vici syndrome

With the current widespread use of multigene panels and comprehensive genomic testing, it has become apparent that the phenotypic spectrum of EPG5-related disorder represents a continuum. At the most severe end of the spectrum is classic Vici syndrome (defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystem involvement characterized by the combination of agenesis of the corpus callosum, cataracts, hypopigmentation, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and failure to thrive); at the milder end of the spectrum are attenuated neurodevelopmental phenotypes with variable multisystem involvement. Median survival in classic Vici syndrome appears to be 24 months, with only 10% of children surviving longer than age five years; the most common causes of death are respiratory infections as a result of primary immunodeficiency and/or cardiac insufficiency resulting from progressive cardiac failure. No data are available on life span in individuals at the milder end of the spectrum. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
340962
Concept ID:
C1855772
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Combined immunodeficiency due to DOCK8 deficiency

Hyper-IgE syndrome-2 with recurrent infections (HIES2) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by recurrent staphylococcal infections of the skin and respiratory tract, eczema, elevated serum immunoglobulin E, and hypereosinophilia. It is distinguished from autosomal dominant HIES1 (147060) by the lack of connective tissue and skeletal involvement (Renner et al., 2004). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of hyper-IgE syndrome, see 147060. See also TYK2 deficiency (611521), a clinically distinct disease entity that includes characteristic features of both autosomal recessive HIES2 and mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD; 209950) (Minegishi et al., 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648410
Concept ID:
C4722305
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Coxsackievirus b3 susceptibility

MedGen UID:
396154
Concept ID:
C1861511
Finding
10.

Pancytopenia due to IKZF1 mutations

Common variable immunodeficiency-13 (CVID13) is an autosomal dominant primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by recurrent bacterial infections, mainly affecting the respiratory tract, and associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and decreased numbers of B cells. The age at onset of clinical features can range from infancy to adulthood, and some patients may have a mild disorder or even remain clinically asymptomatic (summary by Kuehn et al., 2016). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of common variable immunodeficiency, see CVID1 (607594). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
905078
Concept ID:
C4225173
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Immunodeficiency due to CD25 deficiency

Immunodeficiency-41 is an autosomal recessive complex disorder of immune dysregulation. Affected individuals present in infancy with recurrent viral, fungal, and bacterial infections, lymphadenopathy, and variable autoimmune features, such as autoimmune enteropathy and eczematous skin lesions. Immunologic studies show a defect in T-cell regulation (summary by Goudy et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
377894
Concept ID:
C1853392
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases due to partial STAT1 deficiency

Immunodeficiency-31A (IMD31A) results from autosomal dominant (AD) STAT1 deficiency. STAT1 is crucial for cellular responses to IFNA (147660)/IFNB (147640) (type I interferon) and IFNG (147570) (type III interferon). AD STAT1 deficiency selectively affects the IFNG pathway, but not the IFNA/IFNB pathway, and confers a predisposition to mycobacterial infections. Pathogens reported in IMD31A patients include bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and Mycobacterium avium complex, as well as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. IMD31A has low penetrance and a mild clinical phenotype with good prognosis for recovery (review by Al-Muhsen and Casanova, 2008). Two patients with heterozygous STAT1 mutations have been reported with increased susceptibility to adult-onset herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) without a history of other significant infections (Mork et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
862387
Concept ID:
C4013950
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Immunodeficiency 31B

Immunodeficiency-31B (IMD31B) results from autosomal recessive (AR) STAT1 deficiency. STAT1 is crucial for cellular responses to IFNA (147660)/IFNB (147640) (type I interferon) and IFNG (147570) (type III interferon). AR STAT1 deficiency affects both the IFNA/IFNB and the IFNG pathways, resulting in susceptibility to mycobacteria, Salmonella, and viruses, with a severe disease course and often fatal outcome (review by Al-Muhsen and Casanova, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462438
Concept ID:
C3151088
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Immunodeficiency 35

Immunodeficiency-35 (IMD35) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to localized or disseminated mycobacterial infection after BCG vaccination. Some patients may have increased susceptibility to infection with other intracellular organisms and/or viral infections. Fungal infections are not observed. Laboratory studies show normal levels of immune cells but defective signaling in specific immunologic pathways (summary by Kreins et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
409751
Concept ID:
C1969086
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Primary immunodeficiency with natural-killer cell deficiency and adrenal insufficiency

Immunodeficiency-54 is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency characterized by severe intra- and extrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, decreased numbers of natural killer (NK) cells, and recurrent viral infections, most often affecting the respiratory tract and leading to respiratory failure. Affected individuals also have adrenal insufficiency requiring corticosteroid replacement therapy and may have an increased susceptibility to cancer. Laboratory studies of patient cells showed a DNA repair defect (summary by Gineau et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
351256
Concept ID:
C1864947
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Combined immunodeficiency due to STK4 deficiency

Immunodeficiency-110 (IMD110) is an autosomal recessive primary T-cell immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by progressive loss of naive T cells, recurrent bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, warts, and abscesses, and autoimmune manifestations. Patients are at risk for developing lymphoproliferative disorders or lymphoma, particularly associated with EBV. Some patients may show cardiac malformations, including atrial septal defect (Abdollahpour et al., 2012; Nehme et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766857
Concept ID:
C3553943
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Bleeding disorder, platelet-type, 21

BDPLT21 is a hematologic disorder characterized by increased risk of bleeding resulting from a functional platelet defect. Platelets have decreased or even absent dense bodies and abnormally enlarged and fused alpha-granules, and they show defective secretion and aggregation responses to agonists. Platelets are usually enlarged, and some patients may have mild to moderate thrombocytopenia (summary by Saultier et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1386863
Concept ID:
C4479515
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Susceptibility to respiratory infections associated with CD8alpha chain mutation

Immunodeficiency-116 (IMD116) is an autosomal recessive immunologic disorder characterized by the onset of recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infancy or early childhood. Laboratory studies show absence of CD8+ T cells, whereas other lymphocyte numbers and immunoglobulin levels are normal (Dumontet et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
323058
Concept ID:
C1837065
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Autoinflammation, immune dysregulation, and eosinophilia

Autoinflammation, immune dysregulation, and eosinophilia (AIIDE) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset of severe atopic dermatitis and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation, mainly involving the colon, in infancy or early childhood. Affected individuals tend to have asthma and food or environmental allergies, as well as poor overall growth with short stature. Severe liver involvement has also been reported (Takeichi et al., 2021). Laboratory studies show increased eosinophils with normal or increased IgE levels, as well as evidence of a hyperactive immune state, including increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. Treatment with JAK inhibitors, such as ruxolitinib and tofacitinib, results in dramatic clinical improvement (summary by Gruber et al., 2020). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1750270
Concept ID:
C5436572
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome 2

Proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome-2 (PRAAS2) is an autosomal dominant disorder with onset in early infancy. Affected individuals develop severe inflammatory neutrophilic dermatitis, autoimmunity, and variable immunodeficiency (summary by Poli et al., 2018). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of PRAAS, see PRAAS1 (256040). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1648482
Concept ID:
C4747989
Disease or Syndrome
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