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1.

Achondroplasia

Achondroplasia is the most common cause of disproportionate short stature. Affected individuals have rhizomelic shortening of the limbs, macrocephaly, and characteristic facial features with frontal bossing and midface retrusion. In infancy, hypotonia is typical, and acquisition of developmental motor milestones is often both aberrant in pattern and delayed. Intelligence and life span are usually near normal, although craniocervical junction compression increases the risk of death in infancy. Additional complications include obstructive sleep apnea, middle ear dysfunction, kyphosis, and spinal stenosis. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
1289
Concept ID:
C0001080
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Atelosteogenesis type I

The FLNB disorders include a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild to severe. At the mild end are spondylocarpotarsal synostosis (SCT) syndrome and Larsen syndrome; at the severe end are the phenotypic continuum of atelosteogenesis types I (AOI) and III (AOIII) and Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD). SCT syndrome is characterized by postnatal disproportionate short stature, scoliosis and lordosis, clubfeet, hearing loss, dental enamel hypoplasia, carpal and tarsal synostosis, and vertebral fusions. Larsen syndrome is characterized by congenital dislocations of the hip, knee, and elbow; clubfeet (equinovarus or equinovalgus foot deformities); scoliosis and cervical kyphosis, which can be associated with a cervical myelopathy; short, broad, spatulate distal phalanges; distinctive craniofacies (prominent forehead, depressed nasal bridge, malar flattening, and widely spaced eyes); vertebral anomalies; and supernumerary carpal and tarsal bone ossification centers. Individuals with SCT syndrome and Larsen syndrome can have midline cleft palate and hearing loss. AOI and AOIII are characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism; dislocated hips, knees, and elbows; and clubfeet. AOI is lethal in the perinatal period. In individuals with AOIII, survival beyond the neonatal period is possible with intensive and invasive respiratory support. Piepkorn osteochondrodysplasia (POCD) is a perinatal-lethal micromelic dwarfism characterized by flipper-like limbs (polysyndactyly with complete syndactyly of all fingers and toes, hypoplastic or absent first digits, and duplicated intermediate and distal phalanges), macrobrachycephaly, prominant forehead, hypertelorism, and exophthalmos. Occasional features include cleft palate, omphalocele, and cardiac and genitourinary anomalies. The radiographic features at mid-gestation are characteristic. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
82701
Concept ID:
C0265283
Congenital Abnormality
3.

ALG12-congenital disorder of glycosylation

Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), previously called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndromes (CDGSs), are a group of hereditary multisystem disorders first recognized by Jaeken et al. (1980). The characteristic biochemical abnormality of CDGs is the hypoglycosylation of glycoproteins, which is routinely determined by isoelectric focusing (IEF) of serum transferrin. Type I CDG comprises those disorders in which there is a defect in the assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides or their transfer onto nascent glycoproteins, whereas type II CDG comprises defects of trimming, elongation, and processing of protein-bound glycans. CDG1G is a multisystem disorder characterized by impaired psychomotor development, dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, male genital hypoplasia, coagulation abnormalities, and immune deficiency. More variable features include skeletal dysplasia, cardiac anomalies, ocular abnormalities, and sensorineural hearing loss. Some patients die in the early neonatal or infantile period, whereas others are mildly affected and live to adulthood (summary by Tahata et al., 2019). For a general discussion of CDGs, see CDG1A (212065). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
443954
Concept ID:
C2931001
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism, type 1

Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I is a severe autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by dwarfism, microcephaly, and neurologic abnormalities, including mental retardation, brain malformations, and ocular/auditory sensory deficits. Patients often die in early childhood (summary by Pierce and Morse, 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
347149
Concept ID:
C1859452
Congenital Abnormality
5.

Osteogenesis imperfecta type 10

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. OI type X is an autosomal recessive form characterized by multiple bone deformities and fractures, generalized osteopenia, dentinogenesis imperfecta, and blue sclera (Christiansen et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
462561
Concept ID:
C3151211
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 3

Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) is a peroxisomal disorder characterized by disproportionately short stature primarily affecting the proximal parts of the extremities, a typical facial appearance including a broad nasal bridge, epicanthus, high-arched palate, dysplastic external ears, and micrognathia, congenital contractures, characteristic ocular involvement, dwarfism, and severe mental retardation with spasticity. Biochemically, plasmalogen synthesis and phytanic acid alpha-oxidation are defective. Most patients die in the first decade of life. RCDP1 is the most frequent form of RCDP (summary by Wanders and Waterham, 2005). Whereas RCDP1 is a peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD), RCDP3 is classified as a single peroxisome enzyme deficiency (Waterham and Ebberink, 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata, see 215100. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
374012
Concept ID:
C1838612
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Orofaciodigital syndrome type 6

Orofaciodigital syndrome type VI (OFD6), or Varadi syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive disorder distinguished from other orofaciodigital syndromes by metacarpal abnormalities with central polydactyly and by cerebellar abnormalities, including the molar tooth sign (summary by Doss et al., 1998 and Lopez et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
411200
Concept ID:
C2745997
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Neonatal pseudo-hydrocephalic progeroid syndrome

Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome (WDRTS) is a rare autosomal recessive neonatal progeroid disorder characterized by intrauterine growth retardation, failure to thrive, short stature, a progeroid appearance, hypotonia, and variable mental impairment (summary by Toriello, 1990). Average survival in WDRTS is 7 months, although survival into the third decade of life has been reported (Akawi et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
140806
Concept ID:
C0406586
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Paget disease of bone 2, early-onset

Paget disease is a metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormalities of increased bone turnover affecting one or more sites throughout the skeleton, primarily the axial skeleton. Bone lesions in this disorder show evidence of increased osteoclastic bone resorption and disorganized bone structure. See reviews by Ralston et al. (2008) and Ralston and Albagha (2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Paget disease of bone, see 167250. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
899166
Concept ID:
C4085251
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Oculootoradial syndrome

IVIC syndrome (IVIC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by upper limb anomalies (radial ray defects, carpal bone fusion), extraocular motor disturbances, and congenital bilateral nonprogressive mixed hearing loss. More variable features include heart involvement, mild thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis (before age 50), shoulder girdle hypoplasia, imperforate anus, kidney malrotation, and rectovaginal fistula (summary by Paradisi and Arias, 2007). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
233003
Concept ID:
C1327918
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Catel-Manzke syndrome

Catel-Manzke syndrome is characterized by the Pierre Robin anomaly, which comprises cleft palate, glossoptosis, and micrognathia, and a unique form of bilateral hyperphalangy in which there is an accessory bone inserted between the second metacarpal and its corresponding proximal phalanx, resulting in radial deviation of the index finger (summary by Manzke et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375536
Concept ID:
C1844887
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Grebe syndrome

Acromesomelic dysplasia-2A (AMD2A), or Grebe chondrodysplasia, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe abnormality of the limbs and limb joints. The severity of limb shortening progresses in a proximal-distal gradient, with the hands and feet being most affected. The fingers and toes lack articulation and appear as skin appendages. In contrast, axial skeletal structures and the craniofacial skeleton are not affected. Heterozygous individuals are of average stature and have mild skeletal abnormalities (summary by Thomas et al., 1997). Because Grebe syndrome exhibits increasing severity in a proximal-distal gradient, it is classified as a form of acromesomelic dysplasia (Costa et al., 1998). For discussion of the genetic heterogeneity of acromesomelic dysplasia, see AMD1 (602875). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
75557
Concept ID:
C0265260
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia

Acrocapitofemoral dysplasia (ACFD) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by postnatal-onset disproportionate short stature, relatively large head, narrow thorax, lumbar lordosis, short limbs, and brachydactyly with small broad nails (Ozyavuz Cubuk and Duz, 2021). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
334681
Concept ID:
C1843096
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Coxopodopatellar syndrome

Ischiocoxopodopatellar syndrome (ICPPS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a/hypoplasia of the patellas and various anomalies of the pelvis and feet. Pelvic anomalies include bilateral absent or delayed ossification of the ischiopubic junction and infraacetabular axe cut notches. Other major signs are a wide gap between the first and second toes, short fourth and fifth rays of the feet, and pes planus (summary by Bongers et al., 2001). Pediatric-onset pulmonary arterial hypertension may be seen in association with ICPPS (Kerstjens-Frederikse et al., 2013 and Levy et al., 2016). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333474
Concept ID:
C1840061
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Complex lethal osteochondrodysplasia

Complex lethal osteochondrodysplasia of the Symoens-Barnes-Gistelinck type is characterized by severe skeletal osteopenia, microcephaly, multiple fractures, and congenital anomalies including ascites, pleural effusion, and intracranial ventriculomegaly (Symoens et al., 2015). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
900688
Concept ID:
C4225162
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Femoral hypoplasia - unusual facies syndrome

Femoral-facial syndrome (FFS), also known as femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome (FHUFS), is a rare and sporadic multiple congenital anomaly syndrome comprising bilateral femoral hypoplasia and characteristic facial features, such as long philtrum, thin upper lip, micrognathia with or without cleft palate, upward-slanting palpebral fissures, and a short nose with broad tip. Other features, such as renal anomalies, are more variable (summary by Nowaczyk et al., 2010). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
120523
Concept ID:
C0265263
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Kyphomelic dysplasia

A rare primary bone dysplasia characterized, radiologically, by short, stubby long bones, severely angulated femurs and lesser bowing of other long bones (mild, moderate or no bowing), short and wide iliac wings with horizontal acetabular roofs, platyspondyly and a narrow thorax, clinically manifesting with severe, disproportionate short stature. Regression of femora angulation is observed with advancing age. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
140930
Concept ID:
C0432239
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Midface hypoplasia, hearing impairment, elliptocytosis, and nephrocalcinosis

Midface hypoplasia, hearing impairment, elliptocytosis, and nephrocalcinosis is an X-linked recessive disorder with onset of features in early childhood. Anemia is sometimes present. Some patients may show mild early motor or speech delay, but cognition is normal (summary by Andreoletti et al., 2017). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
934777
Concept ID:
C4310810
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Intellectual disability, autosomal dominant 53

MedGen UID:
1623344
Concept ID:
C4540481
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

Skeletal defects, genital hypoplasia, and intellectual disability

MedGen UID:
382795
Concept ID:
C2676231
Disease or Syndrome
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